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10,000 Dresses Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 5 - 9 years
  • Grade Level: Kindergarten - 4
  • Lexile Measure: 540L (What's this?)
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Triangle Square (November 4, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1583228500
  • ISBN-13: 978-1583228500
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 8 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 11.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (27 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #95,238 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"[...] my own favorite (and one of my daughters’ favorite) books about being a “gender variant” kid, 10,000 Dresses by Marcus Ewert. Bailey is a little girl whose family are all convinced that she is a boy. At night she dreams of beautiful dresses and by day she tries to share her visions with the world. Her family all refuse to listen, but in the end, she meets someone who understands and together they make her dream designs come true."
—Lesbian Family

“I loved the way the author referred to Bailey as "her" throughout the book, which struck me as a simple way to introduce children to this topic.”

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About the Author

MARCUS EWERT cocreated the hit animated series, Piki & Poko, Adventures in StarLand, currently being shown on MTV’s LOGO channel. He is writing a memoir about his time with Allen Ginsberg and William Burroughs. He lives in San Francisco.

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Customer Reviews

I stumbled on this book at the public library (yay, SFPL!).
Gentle Reader
This book is a vehicle that opens the door for parents and children to discuss loving things that may be outside their perceived gender norm.
MVire
It's a beautifully illustrated & tenderly written, heartfelt story.
curiouser & curiouser

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 45 people found the following review helpful By E. R. Bird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on February 25, 2009
Format: Hardcover
For all intents and purposes "Cookie" magazine is not the kind of publication I read regularly (in that I make less that $250,000 a year). However, a year or so ago this periodical carried a story I hadn't really heard before. It was a true story of two parents trying to figure out how to deal with their young son. The boy liked wearing dresses, and pretty much preferred to wear them all the time. They didn't mind it in the home, but when he wanted to start wearing dresses to school the parental units weren't sure how to handle the situation. In the end they talked it over with the school, then coached their son on how to deal with kids who made fun of him for his choices. It was a supportive article, one that could easily have gone in another direction had the child had less open and accepting parents. I think of this article when I think of Marcus Ewart and Rex Ray's "10,000 Dresses". I know that there are boys out there who like to wear dresses, and I know that there are other kids out there who would find the practice strange and an excuse to be mean. And I know too that "10,000 Dresses" could be seen as a picture book catering to only a very specific situation as a result. Yet if there is room on a library's shelves for books for kids who want to be pilots, want to be gymnasts, and want to be president, how much more specialized is it to carry a book where kids want to wear dresses? Particularly boy-type kids? A need has now been filled.

It's nighttime once again and you know what Bailey's dreaming about? Dresses. Beautiful dresses hung with crystals or created out of the petals of lilies and roses. Dresses that show windows to other worlds. Gorgeous dresses, 10,000 in all, that are everything Bailey has always wanted.
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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By M. Legare on January 17, 2009
Format: Hardcover
Not having or working with children, this is a book I never would have thought to buy, but I'm really glad I did! (Caveat: I know someone who knows the author, so I decided to check it out.) This simply, but elegantly written and beautifully illustrated children's book is about a child named Bailey. In a world that often has expectations of who a person should be, Bailey's sense of self broadens the spectrum.

10,000 Dresses is a classic "finding happiness in who you are" kind of tale. Bailey has dreams of creating wonderfully designed dresses, but is confronted with disapproval and disdain because "You're a boy." Bailey's sadness is overcome by an interest in helping Laura, who offers friendship and acceptance in return. The unique quality of Bailey's understanding of gender identification is a fine counterpoint to the universality of a protagonist experiencing a challenge and ultimately achieving success.
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By C.L. on September 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
I have to admit, for days this book tickled me because of how it had challenged me. This is the book that when I was in college, I would have insisted my child would own someday and would probably have recommended it to anyone with children.
Oh how opinionated we can be about child rearing until we have one!
We got this book at our public library. My 4 year old daughter picked it out. I glance at the books she picks out (we bring home a lot every week) and this one seemed like the cutesy princessy pink books that are sometimes well written.
Started to read it, loved the description of the dresses.
And then as I'm reading aloud here it comes. You're a boy!
I try not to pre-expose my child to the hardships of the world until she has had a good chance to enjoy it. I'm not ready to talk to her about racism, I want her to continue to play.
She of course loves the conflict she finds in books and really keyed into the "rude" (her word) parents who told their son to go away.
Also at 4, children often begin to recognize the rules of society. She has recently begun to say she doesn't like men with long hair, women with short hair (ironically, I had short hair for most of her life).
So the recognition and challenge of a new societal rule thrilled her.
The second time we read it, she talked about how boys don't wear dresses. I told her some do. She asked if she were a boy could she wear dresses. I told her, of course, if she wanted to. She was quite pleased.
I would say this book, as a children's book, is good enough to grab attention and entertain and enjoy (we've read it a handful of times).
I did have a big problem with the brother's response.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Raeann Simmons on August 22, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a wonderful book, I did feel the parents were not as good as they could have been, but the most inportant thing is showing my son that he's not the only boy who likes dresses. So I found this book to be priceless in our library.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Danio on January 18, 2011
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
A quietly told story that explains well to children (and adults) what it means to be transgender. I read it at the Pride service at my church in June and it was well- received.
Thank you to the author, illustrator and publisher!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Gentle Reader on November 11, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I stumbled on this book at the public library (yay, SFPL!). It is well-written and the illustrations are captivating, as others say. But what I like best about it is that it simply, without explanation or apology, uses the pronoun the child would choose ("she"). And then Bailey meets an older girl who recognizes her as a girl! I can't think of a smarter or happier way to present transgender identity in childhood. My daughter was surprised and delighted by the "twist," too. We have discussed transgender identity ("some people feel like a boy even though their body looks like a girl, and some people feel like a girl even though their body looks like a boy). This has helped her understand not only her butch mama, but herself ("Mommy, I feel like a girl, OK?). I'm so glad there is a book to reinforce this!
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