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I think you'll really enjoy the larger LCD as well as the zippier and better overall performance of the new Rebels. The 50-100% increase in pixel count will let you crop much more aggressively and print larger. There are tons of new features that you might find useful such as Live View for framing a shot and Auto Lighting Optimizer. Try one out in a shop - I think you'll be very pleased. And prices also are pretty good right now. If you're shooting portraits with fast lenses and narrow DoFs, if you're interested in bringing out shadow details, if you shoot RAW then definitely Xsi higher consideration than the XS.
Dec 23, 2008 by Technology Guy
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The list price, on Amazon, or any other web site means nothing. I have a Canon camera that I paid $429 for new three years ago, and that had a list price of $649, but no one ever sold it for that price. The Canon EOS Rebel T3 12.2 MP for $450.00 is a far better deal than the Canon Rebel XS 10.1MP at $400.00. It has far more features, is about two years younger, and shoots video in the HD movie mode. The Canon Rebel XS does not shoot video, only still photos.
Jan 14, 2012 by Marye E.
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I couldn't find the manual on CanonUSA.com so I will have to reply on memory... I believe the camera should be fine with any SDHC card (but not the SDXC cards). Since the camera doesn't have video, however, there's no need for a 32GB card or an extremely fast one. Many photographers like smaller cards - 4GB or 8GB - so that if a card should be lost or fail, you will lose less photos. As far as performance goes, the XS has a more limited write speed so a class 10 card may be overkill (though it could download faster to your PC from a card reader). In my experience, Sandisk cards have performed the best and been most reliable but be sure to buy them from a reputable dealer as there have been numerous reports of poorly performing counterfeits being sold on certain bidding sites.
Aug 3, 2011 by Technology Guy
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Your sensor might be dirty - this requires professional cleaning. The battery would have nothing to do with it. Your lens might be set to MF (manual focus) on accident too!
Jun 6, 2013 by Mrs. Henshaw
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The Canon Rebel XS is fine for learning photography. If you're more serious about your photography, however, I might recommend a model with more features and a little better performance like the Rebel T1i or T2i or maybe even a semi-pro 50D or perhaps the new 60D. But also leave some funds available for more lenses, an external flash, a spare battery and a case. If you only plan on taking the one course and then just using the camera for casual photography afterwards, the XS will do the job.
Sep 3, 2010 by Technology Guy
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I am just graduating to DSLR photgraphy and just ordered my camera - I went through extensive research and boiled down to Canon Xs and Nikon D3000, finally decided to go with Canon. Nikon's guide mode is really good but I feel Canon is a superior machine.
Dec 1, 2009 by Shishir Bhatia
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Go to http://snapsort.com/compare/Canon_EOS_Digital_Rebel_XS-vs-Canon_PowerShot_G12. It has a nice easy to read list of the pros and cons of each. I'm comparing the same two.
Nov 30, 2010 by Terry A. Paetzold
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SD memory cards are limited to less than 4GB according to the standard. SDHC is a newer extension of the SD memory card standard allowing memory cards to be designed with more memory than 4GB (up to 32GB). While the Rebel XS can use either SD or SDHC cards, your computer may not be able to read the newer SDHC cards if its a few years old so you may need an external SD/SDHC card reader. Generally speaking, photos can be copied faster from a class 6 memory card to your computer when you're using a memory card reader. A Class 6 may also help a bit when you're shooting in burst mode and hit the maximum. A class 4 card will work perfectly fine, just somewhat slower when transfering your photos.
Jul 8, 2010 by Technology Guy
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Ah, I see now. The problem is that the flash is a very small directional light source and when you shoot in portrait orientation, as you did for these photos, the flash sits on the left side of the camera and hits the subject at an angle from one side creating a noticable shadow. You won't notice such shadows as much when shooting in landscape orientation because the flash is directly above the lens and the shadows will be mostly behind the subject. To fix this shadow problem, you need to use a bigger more diffuse light source or to relocate the flash so its always above the lens. There are a number products available to diffuse or soften the built-in flash and makes it appear as a larger light source. Sorry, I haven't tried any of these devices so I can't really comment on their overall effectiveness: http://www.amazon.com/Gary-Fong-Puffer-Flash-Diffuser/dp/B0011000R6/ http://www.amazon.com/LumiQuest-Instant-Camera-Screen-Diffuser/dp/B000B5H2BE/ The problem with such devices is that they are still relatively small and the built-in flash is rather weak meaning these devices will limit your range even more. A better solution, but one that unfortunately entails much more expense, is to use an external tilt-swivel bounce flash. These can be mounted to a special bracket that lets you move them so they're always above the lens. But, even better, they can be bounced off a white ceiling in any orientation (if they swivel) giving you a much larger effective light source that is softer and MUCH more flattering to your subjects (for best results, you'll also need to use a "bounce card" - a white index card rubberbanded to the back of the flash works very well - to throw a little of the light forward to brighten shadows and light up eyes). The difference using bounce flash is so dramatic that the expense may be worth it to you. I hope that helps.
Jan 24, 2010 by Technology Guy
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Tech. Guy is right again. To restate a bit, it seems to me that C. Texler is growing into improving photography skills. Thus, I recommend the XSi. The tutorial above may be a bit heavy initially, but think of it in terms of shooting portraits. Note, on 18% grey as a standard. This 18% is on a log scale, so 18% gray is really halfway between the whitest white and the darkest black, that the human eye can see. This "average" brightness is what your camera assumes as a first approximation for determining correct exposure, so that's really not strange, but simple. There are times when the surround of a portrait will be dark [low key] or bright [high key]. (Don't worry about these "key" things, they are advanced techniques for portrait shooting.) In portrait shooting, the average lighting level of the photo may vary from the light on the face of the model, or subject, of the portrait. With the spot meter in the XSi, you can read the light on the face or skin of the subject, ignoring the surrounding area, and get the exposure quite close to correct, for that image/portrait. Many people have medium toned skin. People with very white toning or very dark toning differ somewhat, but they are to be the SUBJECT of the photo, so getting them right is most important. Thus, it normally good to shoot portraits with a spot meter, reading the light from the skin of the subject. Portraits will then turn out pretty well exposed FOR THE SUBJECT, regardless of the background. An excellent reason for a nice spot meter in your DSLR. I'll ignore exposure compensation, except to say that if the portrait seems a bit too light or dark in the LCD view, just use spot metering as normal, but add in perhaps 1 stop plus to lighten the image, or 1 stop minus to darken it. Do this and check the result each time in the camera's LCD, and you'll soon dial in a great exposure. So, this is pretty simple also. An additional advantage of the XSi comes from shooting raw, to better correct any general exposure issues, and there the 14 bit raw of the XSi will be better also. Shooting raw gives more flexibility, but it is a bit more time consuming than a properly exposed jpeg. Thus, you can choose jpeg for ordinary, and shoot raw or raw + jpeg, for difficult lighting. There are a number of fairly inexpensive ways to "develop" or "convert" raw images, and there's Lightroom and similar on a more advanced level. Still, casual shooters will not miss the advanced features of the XSi, but I have faith that an "artistic" shooter will grow, and I like the XSi for C. Texler. Still, it's your choice. If you can, look through the viewfinder of both DLSRs, and see if the differences (how easy or hard to see) are important to you. This varies individually, especially if you wear glasses, etc.
Jan 11, 2009 by EdM
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