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  • B&W 77mm #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter
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B&W 77mm #110 3.0 (1000x) Neutral Density Glass Filter

by B+W
| 5 answered questions

Available from these sellers.
  • Schott Glass Construction.
1 used from $85.00


Product Details

  • Shipping Weight: 3.2 ounces
  • ASIN: B0012LO1UG
  • Item model number: 65-066729_
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Date first available at Amazon.com: October 2, 2006

Product Description

With a light intensity reduction of ten f-stops, this B+W Neutral Density Filter has a slightly stronger warm tone than the ND 106. Its principal field of application is the observation and documentation of industrial processes with extreme brightness, such as steel furnaces, incinerators, glowing filaments in halogen- and other bulbs. The filter factor is 1000x.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
39
4 star
5
3 star
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See all 47 customer reviews
The filter is high quality metal and glass.
T. Streiff
Finally, in some circumstances the brownish color cast can be very hard to correct.
Mark Vandenberg
It is a wonderful filter to use for creating long exposures during the day.
Amazon Customer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 61 people found the following review helpful By K. Class on May 7, 2010
Verified Purchase
This filter works good and is worth the money! I have several B&W filters and I think they are the best.

The 10 stop (110) filter is not the easiest to use though. Because it is so dark, you will have to get everything set before you screw it on. You have to compose, focus and then turn the focus to manual. Then meter the scene and calculate how long your exposure will need to be with the filter on. To take the picture, you will need to use the camera in Manual mode. I compose, focus and meter in Aperature priority, then switch the focus to manual. I then switch to Manual mode and match the setting from Aperature priority. I set the camera to a 2 sec timer with remote. I use a wireless remote to trigger the camera and then take the picture with the camera. You may have to take the picture a couple times to get the exposure that you actually want. Sometimes it seems that this may be a little over 10 stop but I usually will do the shot at a few different lengths. I figure if you went through all that set up, just take a few different length exposures to help ensure you get what you wanted.

A few examples of photos I have taken using the 10 stop filter: Click on 'all sizes' above picture to see larger sizes.

30 sec day time exposure
[...]

60 sec day time exposure
[...]

2 min day time exposure
[...]

8 min exposure just after sunset
[...]
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16 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Rob LaRosa on September 23, 2008
Verified Purchase
I've been able to keep the shutter open for 30 seconds in bright desert sunlight using this filter (in addition to a small aperture). The lens is made of high quality materials and very sturdy.
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14 of 14 people found the following review helpful By G. Kerber on October 12, 2009
Verified Purchase
High quality product. Long exposures come out better than expected. Being a 10-stop ND, you have to compose and focus prior to putting this filter on. But that's not unexpected being so dark. [...].
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By S. Deligan on February 22, 2011
B+W makes a great product. The quality is top-notch. If you're serious about doing long exposure work then this is required kit for you! However, just a few warnings:

1. This is a VERY dark filter. You must adjust your camera completely before mounting the filter. This can easily throw off your focus depending on the lens you're using. I haven't yet found any way around this but if you know of one please let me know.

2. There is a color cast but it's generally more neutral than most other ND filters I've seen. Unlike plastic filters in holders which are clearly purple, this filter is more warm with much less color cast. You can't escape color casting with exposures this long and this one is easily correctly in seconds in Photoshop.

3. Treat it gently! I've kept mine in a cloth case and am very gentle and caring to my equipment, but nonetheless have still seen a few scratches. The surface is easily scratched.

I know that these comments may scare off some people, but if you can deal with them then you will really enjoy the creativity you can find with this filter. 5 stars!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Nat L on April 9, 2012
This is a great filter for getting those smooth silky pictures of water. The 10 stop factor increases the exposure by 1000 times. So if your meter indicates an exposure of 1/30 th second without the filter you should make a 33 second exposure with the filter on the camera. The filter itself feels solid and is clearly [no pun intended] a quality product.

This type of filter is sometimes known as a black glass filter and, as the name implies, cannot be seen through. In order to use the filter you need to:
- mount the camera on a sturdy tripod;
- focus on the subject and take a meter reading without the filter;
- switch to manual exposure;
- leave the aperture the same as it was when the meter reading was taken;
- put the filter on the lens;
- adjust the time of exposure as mentioned above - if your camera does not have a long enough manual setting [my camera's maximum shutter speed is 30 seconds] you'll have to use the bulb function and a watch or other timer;
- switch off autofocus .. if you leave autofocus switched on the camera may start hunting when you press the shutter release;
- switch off any vibration reduction / image stabilization system on the lens or camera .. they introduce movement when the camera is mounted on a tripod;
- activate the shutter release using a cable release or the camera's self- timer mode to prevent moving the camera.

Once I've taken the picture I've found it best to check the image on the back of the camera as I've sometimes found it necessary to try other exposure times. When trying other exposures it's worth bearing in mind that if the indicated exposure time is, say, 30 seconds and the image is too dark an increase in exposure time to 45 seconds is only a half stop increase.
Read more ›
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Paul O on December 1, 2010
Verified Purchase
Nice filter with great 10 stops of light reduction.
As noted in other reviews, you do end up with a warmer image which can be corrected in post, but so far I like it and have kept the warming effect on most of my images so far.
Does not vignette on my Nikon 17-35mm f2.8 (on a full frame Nikon D3S), even when stacked with a Hoya UV0 filter.
So far, the lack of coating has not been an issue.

To give you an idea of how it performs...at the beach (light grey sand, sunny day), pointed towards the sun, I'm getting something like 25 seconds at f22 and iso 100, and perpendicular to the sun I got around 30 seconds at f13, iso 100.
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