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1066 & All That: 75th Anniversary Edition (Methuen Humour) Hardcover – September 1, 2006


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Product Details

  • Series: Methuen Humour
  • Hardcover: 172 pages
  • Publisher: Methuen Publishing Ltd; 75 Anv edition (September 1, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0413775275
  • ISBN-13: 978-0413775276
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 0.8 x 8.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #428,841 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

W. C. Sellar and R. J. Yeatman began publishing their writing in Punch after World War I. Their books include And Now All This, Garden Rubbish, and Horse Nonsense. --This text refers to the Paperback edition.

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Customer Reviews

It's very sharp and "spot on".
Booknut
This 116 page book made me laugh till the tears came on every page and made me laugh till it hurt more than any other book I have read in my long lifetime.
Schmerguls
This would make a great foundation for a course on history.
Louise Mowder

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

45 of 45 people found the following review helpful By Louise Mowder on October 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
I read this first in high school, and in many ways it taught me a philosophy of history that subsequent decades have only confirmed. History is not what you thought - it is what you can remember. What's so marvelous about this work of historical humor is its skewed accuracy, and the uncanny way in which it captures the circularity of misinformation and facts that we use as cultural narrative. While it has a distinctly England-Between-the-Wars sensibility, the tone actually works in its favor. Passages like the discussion of Gaul's division into three parts (weeny, weedy, and weaky) illustrate the ways in which we all attempt to make sense of information which we cannot truly understand because we have no accurate context for it. And when the authors state that this history is the result of "years of research in golf-clubs, gun-rooms, green-rooms, etc.", they are making a very trenchant comment on how ideological history is created, taught, and made into a dominant belief system. This would make a great foundation for a course on history. I'm only sorry that it ends when America became top nation.
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38 of 38 people found the following review helpful By gpeilow@UKpackardbell.org. on May 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
Sellars and Yeatman were two English scoolmasters in the 30's who set out to write a history book for Schoolboys and adults who should know better, for entertainment and fun which has become a minor classic. A basically accurate romp through English history, it also pokes fun at some venerable "English" historical stereotypes and misconceptions as well as satirising( very gently) the English exam system of the inter-war years.
" How big was the bosum of the Pope"- candidates may use protractors,- " England was now "top nation "-discuss", are typical extracts from the mock test questions that follow every chapter.
Typically eclectic , charming and witty, the book actually manages to teach a lot of History whilst correcting many a misunderstanding and shedding light on a number of quite unusual topics.
Read the bit about the Scots, Picts and finally, Irish ( once Scots but now Irish) and the Picts living in Scotland but really Irish, and the Scots, formerly Irish but now living in Scotland ( or living in brackets!). Great fun -charming book!
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41 of 42 people found the following review helpful By Schmerguls VINE VOICE on October 31, 2004
Format: Hardcover
This 116 page book made me laugh till the tears came on every page and made me laugh till it hurt more than any other book I have read in my long lifetime. From the first pages, where among other things the authors comment on the way Romans count backwards, till the last page which deals with 1918 this book is a continuous hoot The test questions at the end of each of the five parts are each a scream in themselves. If you have ever taken a test you will glory in them, and wish that you had been given tests such as that (well, maybe not, but one can dream...) There is not a page which lacks some outrageously funny material. I'd give it ten stars if I could.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By FrKurt Messick HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
Most everyone on the internet (which makes most of you, as you're reading this review via the internet) has encountered, either in a website or a mass emailing, various humourous and hilarious historical satires, usually presented (alas, urban legend alert!) as inaccuracies found in actual student papers. Mistakes such as:
Egypt is in a desert, and watered by irritation.
Handel was half-German, half-Italian, and half-English.
Lincoln lived at the Gettysburg Address.
And so on.
Well, in the days before email and websites (and photocopiers, to pass such gems around the office), these things did exist, and were, because of the difficulty in finding it by other means, published.
Much to our pleasure, one such collection can still be found. `1066 and All That' is a humourous if fractured look at British history. As an aid for the newly historically literate, this text tells you when something that happened is a Good Thing.
Here we find that Julius Caesar conquered Britain on the first date in British history (a very fortuitous coincidence, that) but failed to overrun the country, and left the natives, who were after all only natives, and completely lacking in the skill of making properly constructed Latin sentences such as Veni, Vidi, Vici (a quality absolutely required for gaining the appellation of 'civilised').
`Important Note
The Scots (originally Irish, but by now Scotch) were at this time inhabiting Ireland, having driven the Irish (Picts) out of Scotland; while the Picts (originally Scots) were now Irish (living in brackets) and vice versa. It is essential to keep these distinctions clearly in mind (and vice versa).
Read more ›
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19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By lisax@aol.com on November 25, 1997
Format: Hardcover
An unforgettably funny and very brief review of all the English history that most adults are able to remember, suitably warped, as all things memorable usually are.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Chimonsho on October 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
Here is a minor classic, a rare gem that offers far more than "English humor" or a witty take on that country's past. It shows a shrewd understanding of popular memory, and a keen grasp of how much, or how little, history the public retains despite (because of?) teachers' best efforts. "1066" suggests that people recall a lot about the past, but in trivial, imprecise, partial and bizarre ways, and this in a generally history-minded country like Britain. As for the US---a student recently referred to England's 1381 Pheasant Revolt (it ruffled many feathers, right?). Still, we must soldier on ... unless we too die of a surfeit. Til then, it's fun reading excerpts in class.
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