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The 10th Victim [Blu-ray]


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Region 22824 encoding. (This DVD will not play on most DVD players sold in the US or Canada [Region 1]. This item requires a region specific or multi-region DVD player and compatible TV. More about DVD formats)

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The 10th Victim [Blu-ray] + The Kings of Summer [Blu-ray] + Gravity (Blu-ray 3D + Blu-ray + DVD + UltraViolet Combo Pack)
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Product Details

  • Actors: Marcello Mastroianni, Ursula Andress, Elsa Martinelli, Salvo Randone, Massimo Serato
  • Directors: Elio Petri
  • Producers: Carlo Ponti
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Subtitled, Widescreen, Color, Mono
  • Language: Italian (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English, French, Spanish
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Blue Underground
  • DVD Release Date: September 13, 2011
  • Run Time: 92 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0051T51XQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #57,891 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A Very Funny And Sophisticated Social Satire, Sex Comedy-Slash-Futuristic Adventure Tale That Cashes In On The Charisma Of Its Stars!" -- DVD Verdict

"An Inventive, Witty Sci-Fi Extravaganza!" -- Pauline Kael, The New Yorker

"An Unhinged Chunk Of Satirical Sci-Fi Kitsch!" -- Mondo Digital

"There's A Real Chemistry Between Ursula Andress And Marcello Mastroianni, A Tension That Literally Beams Off The Screen!" -- PopMatters

(Five Stars) "Blessed By A Game Cast, Gorgeous Visuals And A Director Who Would Eventually Make It To The Oscars!" -- Time Out New York

The opening sequence of Elio Petri's 1965 Italian film "The 10th Victim" establishes Ursula Andress as a particular kind of femme fatale. Performing as an erotic dancer in a decadent New York nightclub of the not-so-distant future (where the white plastic décor could have been dreamed up only by a designer at Cinecittà) she is actually a professional assassin who claims her first victim by shooting him in the face with her double-barreled gun-bra: one way of deflecting the male gaze with a vengeance.

One of the countless films inspired, officially or unofficially, by Richard Connell's 1924 short story "The Most Dangerous Game," Petri's black comedy imagines the hunting of humans as a government-sanctioned, globally televised sport, a gladiatorial combat meant to relieve tension and settle conflicts in an otherwise anesthetized world devoted to mindless consumption. Contestants in the Big Hunt are chosen by a punch-card-shuffling computer in Geneva, which matches pairs of strangers (always a man and a woman, just to make things more interesting) and sends them out to kill each other. Whoever survives to make 10 kills receives a $1 million prize and the right to live to enjoy it. Having claimed her ninth victim, the American champion, Caroline Meredith (Ms. Andress), is now ready to move to the next round, where she'll face the ultimate opponent, an Italian (Marcello Mastroianni, his hair dyed blond to match his co-star's).

Petri won the foreign-language Oscar for his far superior 1970 film, "Investigation of a Citizen Above Suspicion," but it's "The 10th Victim" that lingers in the public imagination and has now been reissued by Blue Underground in an excellent Blu-ray transferred from the original negative. The playful production design, by Michelangelo Antonioni's regular collaborator Piero Poletto, probably accounts for much of the movie's continued appeal. His Rome of the future has been assembled out of the architecture of the Fascist past (Bernardo Bertolucci would return to some of the same locations for his 1970 period drama "The Conformist") and festooned with the fetish objects of the Op-Pop 60s: inflatable furniture, Trimline telephones. Several big themes are bruited about in the screenplay: how the mass media have turned violence into entertainment, how capitalism has commodified the most primal human urges, how the vacuity of modern life has obscured the riches of a mythic past. (The climax is set at the Temple of Venus in Rome, transformed for the occasion into a backdrop for a teabag commercial.) But at heart "The 10th Victim" amusingly remains a classic commedia all'italiana of the 1960s, with Mastroianni in his archetypical role as the castrated Casanova, struggling to maintain his inbred macho poise as he is assaulted, not only by Ms. Andress's gun-toting Amazon, but by a mercenary wife (Luce Bonifassy) and an impatient mistress (Elsa Martinelli), who have joined forces against him. In this Italy before civil divorce the battle of the sexes could, in the movies at least, become hilariously literal (as in Pietro Germi's 1961 "Divorce, Italian Style," with Mastroianni as a frustrated Sicilian aristocrat, married to a battle ax but in love with his doe-eyed cousin). In the end there is a 10th victim -- but just who it is and how are questions Petri leaves conspicuously unanswered. -- Dave Kehr, The New York Times, September 30, 2011

Product Description

It is the 21st Century, and society's lust for violence is satisfied by The Big Hunt, an international game of legalized murder. But when the sport's two top assassins are pitted against each other, they find that love is the most dangerous game of all. As the world watches, the hunt is on. Who will become THE 10TH VICTIM? THE 10TH VICTIM is the international cult classic whose wild action and sexy style has influenced a generation of movies, from THE RUNNING MAN to the AUSTIN POWERS series. Now this outrageous satire has been newly remastered from the original negative and is presented here in groovy High Definition!

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
5 star
22
4 star
21
3 star
8
2 star
4
1 star
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See all 55 customer reviews
Very funny, very interesting, lots of ideas.
Michael Valdivielso
It takes place in the future, in a world where violence and war have been eliminated, and human bloodthirst has been redirected towards The Hunt.
M. FUSCO
Only weak point of the film is the wrap-up, but such capers tended towards the flip in that day.
L. S. Slaughter

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

35 of 38 people found the following review helpful By 4-Legged Defender TOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 17, 2009
Format: DVD
I honestly don`t know if the other reviewers saw the same film I did, but I have owned the original, Anchor Bay release for years, and haven`t seen the re-release - maybe something was cut, maybe the previous reviewers don`t get 60`s Euro-cult films like "Danger Diabolik", "Fathom", "I`ll Never Forget What`s Isname", "Modesty Blaise" or, for that matter, "Our Man Flint/In Like Flint", or "Deadlier than The Male". With the international sucess of the Bond films, there weren`t enough films of this type to satisfy audience hunger, hence all of the above, and although are flawed (as are the bond films), these flicks filled the void rather nicely. This one in particular, for it`s Madison Avenue corporate tie-ins to everything from arena sports endorsements to Rock concert sponsorships that are now a permanent part of our lives, it`s actually spot-on in it`s comedic absurdity and a harbinger of all things to come. And we`re only a step away from televised executions in one form or another... Both Marcello Mastroianni and Ursula Andress are superb in their roles, especially Mastroianni in his world-weary approach to his lifestyle and profession, and the subtle humor and ironies are abundant everywhere in this film. Elsa Martinelli is hysterical as well as adorable, so if you think the "Austin Powers" franchise is good (if you`re under 40), and like any of the 60`s flix I referenced above(if you`re slightly older), do yourself a favor and get this film. I`ve seen it 3 times, and still find humor in it. O those fab 60`s...
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23 of 26 people found the following review helpful By KSG on March 9, 2003
Format: DVD
The Italians really did 1960's camp the best. I mean, what is campier than Ursula Andress chasing a man around in a lavender, backless pant suit, while brandishing a pistol? A killer bikini top? A rest, relax and sex stop on the side of the highway? A cult of sunset worshipers in caftans on the beach? The cinematography and locations are so stylish. Rooftop jazz bars in the blaring sun, minimalist interiors decorated with giant, blinking eyeballs, New York's financial district, pre-World Trade Center and Rome and the Vatican shot from a helicopter. Death and fear, what could be funnier?
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16 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 30, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
If you are a fan of:

Marcello at his Mastroianniest

Ursula in full sexual animal mode

60's design and fashion

Dry to the exreme humor

Stylistic Italian direction

Then buy this disc! Oh yea, the story ain't half bad either.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Surfink on October 5, 2011
Format: Blu-ray
Ever since catching about a half hour of The 10th Victim in bleary black-and-white on television as a teenager I had been dying to see the whole film. So when Anchor Bay released it on DVD in 2001 I jumped on it and have watched it at least four times since. It's become one of my all-time favorite movies, a superbly written, directed, and designed combination of futuristic thriller, sex farce, and dark, dryly witty satire--all wrapped up in a colorful, surreal pop/op-art package--that pokes fun at a dystopian future where war has been replaced by the "sport" of legalized murder ("the Big Hunt"), comic books are regarded as "Classics," elderly parents must be turned in to the state for extermination, and advertisers sign up "hunters" to promote their products during live commercials featuring cold-blooded killings.

Ursula Andress (at the peak of her beauty and animal sensuality) and Marcello Mastroianni (the epitome of jaded cool) play hunter and victim, respectively, both vying for a million-dollar prize if one can murder the other, and each also lining up a corporate sponsor who will pay out if the killing can be timed to happen during a live commercial for their product. But love, of all things, intervenes (not to mention his ex-wife and mistress), seriously complicating their cat-and-mouse game of death. Along the way we are treated to some great futuristic pop-art set designs and decor, terrific, catchy Eurojazz soundtrack, and breezy satire of the media, society's fetishization of violence, religion, marriage and divorce, Bondian intrigue, television, and shameless, opportunistic corporate advertising.
Read more ›
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By documentia on January 20, 2003
Format: DVD
An early forerunner in the futuristic "legalized-killing-as-TV-entertainment" genre, The 10th Victim lays the groundwork for many subsequent films including Roller Ball, The Running Man, and most recently Daniel Minahan's Series 7: The Contenders. Briefly summarized: in the 21st Century Marcello Mastroianni and Ursula Andress are two all-star assassins pitted against each other in "The Big Hunt," an international game of legalized murder in which a score of 10-kills awards the victor a prize of one million dollars. What sets this film apart from the others is not so much the plot (as while it may be the original in concept, its followers certainly succeed better in overall craft and more pointed satire) as the permanent aesthetic time/date-stamp of 1960's camp. The 10th Victim is a 60's version of the future, in the very best sense. It's a future full of awesome color schemes, ultra-cool music, great furniture, swanky pads, and characters that just ooze with sexual energy. The gem of this film is an opening sequence in which Andress dances around her ninth victim in a hipster club, fashionably slapping the men in the audience with cool and choreographed abandon before mowing down her adversary with bullets fired from a gun hidden in her bra (a gimmick later ripped for the Fembots in Austin Powers). And while the film offers a couple of other moments that approach the brilliance of this opening, its full potential is never realized -- things are not pushed nearly far enough. My biggest complaint: the alligator death chair catapult gizmo is never put to full effect, though perhaps I'm just yearning for the very thing this film means to comment on - more bloody spectacle. All in all it's definitely worth seeing, though you might supplement it with a healthy dose of Mario Bava's Danger Diabolik for good measure.
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