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82 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful, Impactful Story
"127 Hours", director Danny Boyle's ("Trainspotting", "28 Days Later") follow-up to "Slumdog Millionaire" is a near great film. I honestly can't tell you the last time I was so moved by a piece of celluloid. "127" has created both pleasant and nightmarish memories, memories that will stay with me for many, many years to come.

Aron Ralston (James Franco) quickly...
Published on November 11, 2010 by thornhillatthemovies.com

versus
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Great story!
I remembered hearing this story a few years ago. It IS a great story, just not a great movie, I'm sorry to say. There is great landscape in the movie, but it is just slow, with little talking. For me, the music was annoying, but a big part of the movie. I really hate to give bad reviews, but this was really disappointing.
Published 9 months ago by Nota wearytraveller


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82 of 92 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Powerful, Impactful Story, November 11, 2010
By 
thornhillatthemovies.com (Venice, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
"127 Hours", director Danny Boyle's ("Trainspotting", "28 Days Later") follow-up to "Slumdog Millionaire" is a near great film. I honestly can't tell you the last time I was so moved by a piece of celluloid. "127" has created both pleasant and nightmarish memories, memories that will stay with me for many, many years to come.

Aron Ralston (James Franco) quickly grabs some supplies and heads out to his favorite spot, the canyons near Moab, Utah. As soon as the sun rises, he jumps on a mountain bike and heads out to explore and enjoy the great outdoors, heading to a spot some twenty miles away. He crosses paths with two young women, Kristi (Kate Mara) and Megan (Amber Tamblyn) and agrees to show them the way to their destination. Once there, they swim and dive and have fun. After a few hours, they head on to complete their individual journeys. As Aron navigates a narrow crevasse, a small boulder comes loose, causing him to fall and wedging his arm between the wall and the boulder. He can't budge it and becomes worried at the sight of some streaks of blood. Aron takes stock and has very limited food, some water, stretchy cord, a camera, a video camera and a dull knife. Before leaving for the trip, he wasn't able to find his Swiss Army knife, so he is left with a dull give-away promotional knife. He tries to chip away at the sandstone, to move the rock, but doesn't make any progress. Over the next five days and twenty hours, Aron has to figure out how to use the limited supplies he has to survive until he can be rescued. Or, on the other hand, he has to figure out if and how he can get out of this situation on his own.

Boyle starts the film by masterfully depicting why Aron, and others like him, are so eager to escape the city, eager to mountain bike in the wilderness, eager to climb rock formations, eager to backpack. When he meets the two women, they even remark about how they don't feel like they figured into Aron's day. Aron is the type of guy who actively looks for adventure and makes decisions on the spur of the moment. This is why he agrees to spend time with the young women, setting his schedule back half a day.

As soon as Aron gets trapped, Boyle has to do something to give us more details into the adventurer's history. He has to make us care about this man and he can't really do that by keeping us only with Aron for the rest of the film. As Ralston tries to assess his situation, a memory surfaces and this gives Boyle the opportunity to show us a brief part of his past. The technique Boyle uses seems more suited for films made in the late '60s. And normally, this would drive me crazy. But in this situation, these moments work, primarily because they are pretty brief. They also move back and forth between more real and more imagined settings. For instance, Aron remembers a moment he and his dad shared during his childhood. They sit on an old couch in the family home, talking. Then his dad is gone and young Aron is still sitting on the couch, but the couch now sits in the crevasse Aron is trapped in, the sand and rock walls surrounding the furniture, visible to the side.

Boyle introduces us to Aron's father (Treat Williams) and mother (Kate Burton) and the love of his life, Rana (Clemence Poesy). These moments, though brief, helps to give us insight into Aron's character and life. Because they are so brief, it is surprising that we feel we know Aron and his family so well. We really get a feeling for him and come to care for him.

A lot of the credit for the success of this film lies with Franco. For much of the relatively short running time, Franco is the only person on screen and this would only serve to amplify any poorly acted moment, any false characterization, any thing that doesn't ring true. From the first moment he is on screen, we start to understand him. He is most happy when he is explaining what some stretch of wilderness is, the history of a cavern, earning some bit of solitude to compensate for any minute of time he is forced to spend cooped up in the city. In this element, he finds peace and revels in every moment.

When he meets Kristi and Megan, Franco's smile helps us recognize he simply wants to have a good time. Sex isn't a part of the equation, he wants to share some moments with like personalities. Later, when he is trapped and has a lot of time to think, he remembers back to some moments in his life. When we return to him, Franco's demeanor and facial expressions seem to be an honest portrayal of how the young man would react. And make us feel he is really remembering these moments.

When Aron finally realizes what he has to do, Franco shows us the horror of this realization and the pain of this decision.

THE moment is both necessary and extremely difficult to watch. It is necessary because it is a part of the story. But so many other filmmakers would shy away from a frank depiction of this moment. Boyle doesn't. Without it, the story would be nowhere near as impactful. Because of it, you might have nightmares. It would be gruesome enough, hard enough to watch if he had found his Swiss Army knife. But without it... I just shudder thinking about it again.

The film ends with a coda giving us an update on Aron Ralston's life. During the moments before this, I started to tear up because he was going to be okay, because he was going to make it, something I already knew given he wrote the book this film is based on, but I was still extremely moved. And the last few moments give us a glimpse of the real Ralston and all of the people affected by this incident. Because of everything Boyle and Franco are able to accomplish throughout the film, I was extremely moved by these brief images.

Best of all, Boyle ends the film, presents this coda, in a way stylistically in tune with the rest of the journey and all of those memory flashbacks/

"127 Hours" is a great piece of filmmaking. You need to see it. You can always close your eyes if that scene becomes too much for you.
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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Resourcefulness And Perseverance--A Harrowing, Yet Life Affirming, Struggle For Survival, November 30, 2010
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
From the macabre paranoia of "Shallow Grave" to the comedic debauchery of "Trainspotting" to the disturbing creepiness of "28 Days Later" to the fanciful romanticism of "Slumdog Millionaire," director Danny Boyle has made kinetic films that really connect to the viewer at a visceral level. Very much a visual stylist, Boyle uses every tool at his disposal--quick cut editing, frantic camera movement, fantasy sequences, jarring music--to really delve into the emotional core of whatever story he is telling. At first glance, "127 Hours" would seem an odd follow-up to the Oscar winning "Slumdog." Stripped down to the most primal level, "127 Hours" is one of the simplest, most straightforward narratives you're likely to encounter. And yet, through the technical bells and whistles and an earnest James Franco performance, you are immersed in a world of madness, desperation, perseverance, hope, struggle and ultimately survival. And there is no denying that this very matter-of-fact tale packs a punch!

Franco plays real-life adventurer Aron Ralston. In 2003, the reckless Ralston set off to explore Utah's Canyonlands National Park. No one knew where he is going and safety was secondary to fun in Ralston's blissed-out commune with nature. While negotiating a crevice, a boulder dislodged and trapped Ralston's arm stranding him in isolation within the earth. The film then documents Ralston's dilemma for the next 127 hours. With limited supplies and no mobility, Boyle makes the most of his claustrophobic environment by inviting us into Ralston's mind. And the primary success of "127 Hours" is that it really traps us within this confined space as well. We're there to the bitter end where survival and sacrifice meet at a crossroads.

In many ways, I wish people cold go into "127 Hours" with no expectations and forewarning of what is going to happen. I know that's naive. Ralston's tale is certainly public domain--reported on TV, the subject of books and news features. In fact, the entire film is marketed around the gruesome turning point in Ralston's struggle. This decisive act that spared Ralston's life is so harrowing and Boyle does not shy away from its unpleasantness. But the promise of this scene lingers over all that proceeds it. We are biding time for this ultimate act. We know what's going to happen and we know it's going to be graphic--everyone has told us so well in advance. But that sequence is so strong, it has come to define the entire movie. "127 Hours" has literally come to be described as "the movie where he......." (I, for my part, have resisted divulging this point--although you can read it everywhere else, including the product description and other reviews).

Franco does a great job making us root for Ralston. Impetuous and somewhat irresponsible, this thrill seeker didn't take the necessary precautions advisable. He thought he was immune to the dangers inherent in the mountain. But Franco makes him such a life force, you want him to be the victor over his poor decisions. His whip smart survival instinct keeps him alive and he never gives up. But as he faces mortality, he comes to understand his shortcomings and even faces visions of the future. His videotaped proclamations to his family are the emotional highpoint of "127 Hours." Franco is a physical actor and acquits himself well in the adventure scenes--but it is the immobile moments that showcase an interior to Franco that hasn't always been on full display in other films. Boyle takes full advantage of Franco and delivers one of the year's most effective human dramas. Stunning in its simplicity, "127 Hours" has an energy and vitality that make it stand out from the pack. KGHarris, 11/10.
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20 of 23 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Resourcefulness And Perseverance--A Harrowing, Yet Life Affirming, Struggle For Survival, February 21, 2011
This review is from: 127 Hours [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
From the macabre paranoia of "Shallow Grave" to the comedic debauchery of "Trainspotting" to the disturbing creepiness of "28 Days Later" to the fanciful romanticism of "Slumdog Millionaire," director Danny Boyle has made kinetic films that really connect to the viewer at a visceral level. Very much a visual stylist, Boyle uses every tool at his disposal--quick cut editing, frantic camera movement, fantasy sequences, jarring music--to really delve into the emotional core of whatever story he is telling. At first glance, "127 Hours" would seem an odd follow-up to the Oscar winning "Slumdog." Stripped down to the most primal level, "127 Hours" is one of the simplest, most straightforward narratives you're likely to encounter. And yet, through the technical bells and whistles and an earnest James Franco performance, you are immersed in a world of madness, desperation, perseverance, hope, struggle and ultimately survival. And there is no denying that this very matter-of-fact tale packs a punch!

Franco plays real-life adventurer Aron Ralston. In 2003, the reckless Ralston set off to explore Utah's Canyonlands National Park. No one knew where he is going and safety was secondary to fun in Ralston's blissed-out commune with nature. While negotiating a crevice, a boulder dislodged and trapped Ralston's arm stranding him in isolation within the earth. The film then documents Ralston's dilemma for the next 127 hours. With limited supplies and no mobility, Boyle makes the most of his claustrophobic environment by inviting us into Ralston's mind. And the primary success of "127 Hours" is that it really traps us within this confined space as well. We're there to the bitter end where survival and sacrifice meet at a crossroads.

In many ways, I wish people cold go into "127 Hours" with no expectations and forewarning of what is going to happen. I know that's naive. Ralston's tale is certainly public domain--reported on TV, the subject of books and news features. In fact, the entire film is marketed around the gruesome turning point in Ralston's struggle. This decisive act that spared Ralston's life is so harrowing and Boyle does not shy away from its unpleasantness. But the promise of this scene lingers over all that proceeds it. We are biding time for this ultimate act. We know what's going to happen and we know it's going to be graphic--everyone has told us so well in advance. But that sequence is so strong, it has come to define the entire movie. "127 Hours" has literally come to be described as "the movie where he......." (I, for my part, have resisted divulging this point--although you can read it everywhere else, including the product description and other reviews).

Franco does a great job making us root for Ralston. Impetuous and somewhat irresponsible, this thrill seeker didn't take the necessary precautions advisable. He thought he was immune to the dangers inherent in the mountain. But Franco makes him such a life force, you want him to be the victor over his poor decisions. His whip smart survival instinct keeps him alive and he never gives up. But as he faces mortality, he comes to understand his shortcomings and even faces visions of the future. His videotaped proclamations to his family are the emotional highpoint of "127 Hours." Franco is a physical actor and acquits himself well in the adventure scenes--but it is the immobile moments that showcase an interior to Franco that hasn't always been on full display in other films. Boyle takes full advantage of Franco and delivers one of the year's most effective human dramas. Stunning in its simplicity, "127 Hours" has an energy and vitality that make it stand out from the pack. KGHarris, 11/10.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars What a great story of persistence and survival!, December 22, 2010
By 
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
I saw this movie yesterday and have to say that it is one of the great movies of the year. This is no surprise when you learn that Danny Boyle was the Director and Producer as Slumdog Millionaire was great as well. This is the story as many folks know about a man who was (is) an avid hiker and mountaineer and is out one day climbing and hiking and gets trapped by a boulder. The only way to get out ended up being to saw his arm off and walk out. The movie is not for anyone who is squeamish but I have to say that even those parts were done in a realistic but sensitive way. The fact that he was able to survive and get out and make it back and even more importantly go on with his life as a climber and mountaineer is amazing. I think it is hard to say "if he can do it I can do it" because to be honest I hardly know anyone who truly can say they can do this. Who really do you know who can saw off their own arm with a pocketknife? But the movie itself was great, likely will win some awards, and I highly recommend it.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An Inspirational Conquest of The Human Spirit, February 1, 2011
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
127 Hours is a 2010 film directed by Danny Boyle (28 Days Later, Slumdog Millionaire). He is making amazing and realistic films on tiny fractions of the budget it takes for any fat pompous producer's wallet to hock films about androids who turn into minivans, and he's winning the praise of his peers in doing so. If I had Danny Boyle over for dinner I'll bet he could take my camcorder and create a ten minute short film that might be good enough for an Oscar nomination. He's that good, and that's why he can take an inspirational story about real-life climber Aron Ralston, who in May of 2003 was forced to amputate his own arm to free himself from a boulder that had fallen on him, and make a movie out of it. True that it's an inspirational story, but at the same time it's still a movie about a guy who is trapped suffering in a canyon for more than five days and eventually makes the decision to break his arm and slowly cut it off with a cheap jackknife. On the surface it certainly doesn't seem to sound like a story a mainstream audience would want to sit through for 90 minutes, but if church groups can bring kids to see The Passion of the Christ, and mobs of kids can go see repeated glorification of humans potentially ending life on Earth, then you can see a movie about one guy who would do the unthinkable to talk to his mother and father again, to fix up a relationship with a woman he loved, to see his sister get married, and to hold his unborn son for the first time. It is an enriching film about one man whose life was faced with a horrendous obstacle that smashed his hand and his whole life forever. In the prime of Aron's life he very suddenly found himself staring death right in the face, and told death he was simply not ready. There was no way this guy was going to die, not like this. Boyle and his team should be praised for taking an effectually unfilmmable concept and turning into the best film of 2010.

127 Hours follows the true story of Raltson (play brilliantly by James Franco), an adventurous mountain climber and canyoneer, who has to save himself after a boulder traps his hand and him in an isolated canyon in Utah. Throughout the next 127 hours Ralston assesses his life before the boulder fell on him. He eventually musters the courage to amputate his arm, climb a 60 foot canyon wall, and tread for 8 miles before finally being rescued. Be warned, it is as realistic an ordeal as you can imagine so the camera doesn't look away when he makes the difficult decision to leave his arm behind.

Obviously this is a film that simply would not work without a great casting choice followed by a truly great performance. James Franco has, along with perhaps Natalie Portman in Black Swan, put together the best performance I've seen so far in 2010, which has been a very strong year, but I still have movies to see. Franco more than deserves the praise he is getting. It is another level displayed by this great young actor and if he doesn't win an Oscar for this, he will get his recognition in time.

In real-life Ralston has said the film is almost like a documentary of what happened to him. I'm sure it was uncomfortable for him to watch, as it was certainly uncomfortable at times for me, but in the end the reward of life is worth it. 127 Hours really is a meditation on and a celebration of life. I can only hope that if I were in that canyon I would have the courage to make such a decision and shame on me if I couldn't, given how fortunate I am to have the things I have. Few films made in the last ten or so years had me pondering these kinds of things, and if I were to ask myself why I watch and love movies, I might say because I hope to find further reverence for life and the most powerful encouragement to live it fully. This movie gets my highest recommendation.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Bone-Breaking Good Time, March 7, 2011
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
127 Hours is a "based on true events" adventure movie about survival and self- perserverance. It is wonderfully directed by Academy Award Winning Director, Danny Boyle, who has does amazing films such as Trainspotting, The Beach, 28 Days Later, Sunshine and Slumdog Millionaire. James Franco, again offers an extraordinary performance on screen as he portrays Aron Ralston during his amazing story of survival, human ambition, the will to never give up, strength and self perseverance. I will say IMO that if this movie came out in 2009 or in 2011 that Franco would steal the Best Actor award, but with Colin Firth portraying the stammering King George VI it was a difficult year to boot. The movie itself is very enjoyable to watch from beginning to end. The music throughout it is fast paced, uppity, and very fit for the film itself. There are not many other actors on screen besides the two girls Aron meets while in the canyons and a couple of flashbacks of family throughout the film therefore leaving us with Franco to solely provide the entertainment and show to us the gritty act that happened for those five days. The movie wastes NO time at all giving us 20 minutes of Aron getting to the canyons, meeting two girls and showing them an awesome hideout with a lake to jump into. Next Aron embarks out on his own and soon finds himself caught between a rock and a hard place. From there on the movie is nothing short of amazing and intense. I had to rewind when Franco fell and got his arm stuck. It was wild! Thankfully the film is only an hour and a half meaning it is never dull and does not have extra footage in it not needed. The flashblacks in the film are very important and provide a lot to the background of the story. The most heart-felt flashback that stood out to me was the one where Aron's father brought him out to the canyons as a little kid and sat with him gazing off at its beauty. This one stood out mostly to me becasue you understand Aron's love for the outdoors and adventure. The movie has everything it needs to provide the watcher with a strong reenactment of what happened back in April of 2003. Aron Ralston did what many never would have had the ability to do. He was a true survivor and many need to see this to understand his story, it's a great one! I bought this movie and was not disappointed at all! I'd recommend the same. I hope I've been helpful..

-Cam
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Carbon copy of real event still ends as a riveting tale of survival, February 22, 2011
By 
Turfseer (New York, N.Y.) - See all my reviews
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
*** This review may contain spoilers ***

I wanted to see '127 Hours' because I kept wondering how anyone can make a film about a guy who gets his arm stuck under a boulder while hiking in the desert and then has to cut it off. Not only was I aware of the whole concept of the film and the ending but I also was wondering how do you make an interesting film about someone who is stuck in one small place for such a long period of time.

To my great surprise, '127 Hours' is a riveting tale of one man's survival in the face of certain death. How does director Danny Boyle pull it off? For starters, James Franco is a brilliant casting choice to play Aron Ralston, the daredevil hiker who ends up between a 'rock and a hard place'. Franco is an immensely likable fellow who conveys Ralston's reckless and devil may care attitude that leads him to his date with destiny. When Ralston meets the two female hikers and escorts them to an underground grotto where they go swimming, Boyle uses that scene to reinforce our perception of Ralston as a daredevil, who risks his own life (as well as the lives of two strangers) as he seeks one more thrill, sliding between a crevice, and diving into the grotto, from a distance that an ordinary person would consider to be unsafe.

The incredible thing about '127 Hours' (and I found this out after I watched the film) is that almost everything that we see actually happened. Ralston did have a video camera and filmed himself while his arm was stuck under the rock. And the video camera that was used in the film, was also the actual camera Ralston used when he was trapped! Boyle builds the tension simply by documenting everything that happened. At first Ralston believes he can move the rock through sheer strength. When that fails, he tries to be more calculating by using a pocket knife to chip away at the rock but soon discovers that plan is completely ineffectual (adding to the tension is the scene where Ralston drops the knife and must retrieve it by attaching a bent wire and guiding it down to where the knife has fallen, by placing the wire between his toes).

Calling upon his survival skills, Ralston then designs an elaborate pulley system, hoping he'll be able to lift the rock, by using the weight of his body to move it. Finally, when that fails, he must concentrate on conserving the little water he has left, and figure out some other plan to extricate himself from his dire predicament. Boyle switches things up by introducing scenes in which Ralston begins hallucinating. In one such harrowing scene, after a cloud burst above in the desert, water cascades down into the crevice where Ralston is trapped, and he sees himself drowning. In another hallucinatory scene, Boyle introduces some comic relief by having Ralston imagine himself as a game show contestant, mocked by canned laughter due to his short-sightedness in failing to tell anyone where he was going.

As to the amputation itself, I was relieved it wasn't as gruesome as I had anticipated. Actually, it was more fascinating than terrifying. In an earlier scene, Ralston discovers that he is unable to sever his arm using his small dull knife. Later, however, he figures out that he must break his arm in two places and then use the plier part of his knife kit to literally grind and twist until he cuts off his arm.

As a result of this life changing event, Ralston has the epiphany that he had taken his family and friends for granted. Visions of the family and friends appear during the denouement and at the very end, Ralston himself, swimming in a pool, without his prosthesis, This of course suggests that the amputation has not squelched Ralston's love of the outdoors and taste for adventure. But one thing is for sure: when he takes a trip, he'll never again fail to tell those he is close to, where he is going.

The cinematography and the editing is superb here in both the expansive exterior shots and in the claustrophobic area where Franco maneuvers. True, '127 Hours' is basically a carbon copy of a true event, but Director Danny Boyle manages to take a story where we already know the ending and still made it gripping and compelling. That, of course, is no easy feat!
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Robbed of an Oscar!, March 2, 2011
This review is from: 127 Hours [Blu-ray] (Blu-ray)
You would think that a movie about one man stuck in a narrow canyon for most of the movie would get boring fast. The fact that it doesn't is a testament to the acting of James Franco and direction of Danny Boyle (Trainspotting, Slumdog Millionaire). The soundtrack is a perfect accompaniment to the story as well (and sounds even better on blu-ray). You don't have to be an "outdoorsy" person to enjoy this film. You just have to have a pulse.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Stuck between a rock and a hard place, January 29, 2011
By 
Monkdude (Hampton, Virginia) - See all my reviews
It's about time 127 Hours got the wide release (thanks to 6 Oscar nominations) it deserves, so today was the day I got to see what all the fuss was about.

I think everyone going to see the film knows the basic facts of this true story. Aron Ralston goes hiking, falls, has a giant boulder land on his arm, and in the end he has to resort to removing his arm with a dull pocket knife to allow for his escape.

Even more so than Tom Hanks in Cast Away, James Franco is the movie. There is a brief scene before the fall when he meets two girls and there are a number of quick flashback and fantasy type sequences with other characters, but for the most part Franco is the only person on screen. I remember the days when almost everyone (including me) said this guy couldn't act. I'm talking about his role in the Spider-Man movies. The first time I noticed real acting talent was when he played the stoner in Pineapple Express. I'm here to tell you that this is the best performance by an actor I've seen in any movie released in 2010. I haven't seen The King's Speech yet, but Colin Firth will have his work cut out for him in my eyes. Into the Wild shows another character based on a real person and similar to the one Franco plays here, but rather than a kid who thinks he knows everything about survival and the wilderness, we sympathize and want this character to prevail, mostly thanks to James Franco's likeability in the role. He shows just about every range of emotion and I never for once thought I was watching anything other than the real person fighting for his life.

There are two things I didn't really care for. Danny Boyle's style of quick editing felt out of place at times and I could have done without some of the music choices.

Other than those minor negatives, 127 Hours is well paced, suspenseful, expertly acted, memorable and easily one of top 5 films of 2010.

If you like this movie or if it sounds like you would, check out the one man show that is Ryan Reynolds in Buried for nearly the same claustrophobic intensity. For the man surviving in nature aspect, check out Sean Penn's Into the Wild. They are not at the same level as this film, but both are still worthy of a rental for those with more than an ounce of patience.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Engaging Film, but DVD Product not as Advertised, March 4, 2011
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: 127 Hours (DVD)
After seeing the film in theatres twice, I decided to order (directly from Amazon) this excellent (in my opinion) film by Danny Boyle. While, as with any film, I mostly bought it for the main feature, I was also interested in the background of the film and was looking forward to watching the Special Features listed as part of the product description:

"- Feature Commentary by Director/Co-Screenwriter Danny Boyle, Producer Christian Colson and Co-Screenwriter Simon Beaufoy
- Deleted Scenes
- Search & Rescue: Actual events that aided the search and rescue of Aron Ralston
- 127 Hours: An Extraordinary View - A unique collaboration between the director and actor
- Disc 2: Digital Copy"

However, the single disc I received only contained the commentary and deleted scenes. Neither of the featurettes were on the disc and there was no second disc containing the digital copy. After speaking with an Amazon representative and researching this a little bit, I discovered that these features are only a part of the Blu-Ray product. So, if you're into Blu-Ray (I am not, but that's a whole other story), then you will get everything you ordered. Unfortunately, the DVD comes up short, at least based on Amazon's description of it. Needless to say, I was a bit disappointed with the product I received.
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