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187


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Product Details

  • Actors: Samuel L Jackson
  • Format: NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 5.1), French (Dolby Digital 4.0)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: Unknown
  • Rated: PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Warner
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (125 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0047CG970
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #659,944 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Customer Reviews

Samuel L. Jackson played a great role and did a outstanding job just like the other actors.
Adara
No teacher is going to hunt down his/her students like in the film but again the basic idea of how to handle a threat or violence in a school is universal.
Crossfit Len
No spoilers here, however I can say the acting was good all around and the movie never feels contrived or phony.
H. Garry Stromdahl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

33 of 36 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 2, 2003
Format: VHS Tape
Other than its obvious telling from a teachers point of view, it gives you a rare glipse into latino ganster life in southern california(something not seen much in non-underground films.) It gets a bit unbelievable with the idea of a teacher going after his students outside of school when they push him over the edge, but that may be how some teachers really feel in that same situation. The ending is powerful because of how Samuel L. Jacksons character gets a hardcore latino gangster to break down and admit a sincere reason why he lives the type of life he does, also because of what Samuel L. Jackson is willing to do to himself for the life this gangster has had to lead and to prove a point in how unnessary it was to live that type of life. This movie really relates to me because I am someone who use to hang around latino gangs but gave it up realizing it was the wrong way to go.
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52 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Crossfit Len on August 20, 2000
Format: DVD
I have been very fortunate to have a great job as a teacher. I have been lucky enough to see all different types of schools: rural, suburban, and urban. My three years in a Bronx high school were some of the most challenging, frustrating, rewarding, scary, funny, heartwarming, and gutwrenching of my life. Inner-city teaching is truly one of the toughest jobs in the world.
There have been many movies about inner-city teachers: Dangerous Minds, The Substitute, Teachers, The Principal just to name a few. While none of those movies are terrible and some were fun to watch, none of them really showed what it is like to be a teacher. 187 is the only teaching movie I have seen that captures the emotions a teacher goes through teaching in that environment.
Now parts of 187 get carried away. I won't deny that. But the basic theme of what can happen if a teacher takes a situation to the level of the students is universal. No teacher is going to hunt down his/her students like in the film but again the basic idea of how to handle a threat or violence in a school is universal.
I also like how the film discussed how Samuel Jackson's character is trying to regain his desire to teach and playing that off the young idealistic teacher and the burned out teacher. These are real characters and I felt the comparisson and outcomes was extremely credible.
Bottom line is this, I do not think non-teachers will love this movie they might like it. But this is a teachers movie. Again, its goes over the top at times but the basic themes and emotions are extremely accurate.
This is a powerful and realistic film.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Jason VINE VOICE on June 22, 2008
Format: DVD
Many teachers in today's school systems must feel helpless. Years ago there was the threat of corporal punishment, if not the actual fear of parent retaliation. Now, however, children are spoiled, often without strong male-role models (particularly in the more urban areas), there is simply no respect for authority or desire to contribute meaningfully to society, all parents think their child is a perfect little snowflake, and the outlook for a teacher in a troubled area is particularly bleak and hopeless.

Trevor Garfield (Samuel L. Jackson) is a high school teacher who has recently been reassigned as a substitute in a rough, dilapidated LA school district after suffering a shank attack at the hands of one of his former students. Realizing the corrupt, bereaucratic school administration will never help him when the misbehavior and student intimidation begins anew, Garfield is handcuffed by not only rules, but also fear, and the depressing reality that his values and morals are not shared by many of his students, particularly the local gang leaders Benny (Lobo Sebastian) and Cesar (Clifton Gonzalez Gonzalez). In no time at all, Garfield - who is immediately immersed in the gang culture when students begin to call him Mr. G, where G is for Gangster - breaks down psychologically and flips from gentle, timid, caring teacher to possessed madman intent on retaliation.

Samuel L. Jackson turns in a powerhouse performance in this movie, showing ghetto schools from a teacher's perspective. The attitude flip is classic Samuel L. Jackson, just as quick as Michael Douglas in Falling Down, but a bit more angry, and the retaliation used on the punk thugs throughout the movie, while over the top, is ingenious.

A teacher until the end, Mr. G proves that Cesar's way of life is meaningless, and instructs that he's willing to quite literally risk everything, to die, if it will provide one last lesson, one last Pyrrhic victory.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Judy K. Polhemus VINE VOICE on September 14, 2010
Format: DVD
A former principal once said (in utter irony) that teachers would like to "teach the best and shoot the rest," but that was not going to happen (teaching only the best and shooting the rest). Basically, that idea is the premise of "187," a term referring to the on-air police code for "dead."

Early in the movie, when Samuel L. Jackson's character Trevor Garfield is stabbed repeatedly in the back after warning his principal that this very act was going to happen, the viewer viscerally understands a teacher's stultifying fear in an urban school when there is no support. Garfield does not die physically, but something inside him does. Not his will power, it thrives. Not his machismo, it heightens. Not his desire to teach, but a piece of it breaks off to become dark and malignant. Not his compassion, but it forks into something normal and something twisted. A vicious act, not just on Garfield's person, but also on his choice of how to value and direct his life, chips away some of his humanity.

After a more than year-long recovery Garfield traverses a continent away from New York to settle in California and begin substitute teaching. His assignment? Where else but in a "temporary" building subject to gang-banger violence and mayhem. On his first day he is dealt a threat by an police-ankle-bracelet-wearing gang-banger. Of course, there is the requisite confrontation between the two, setting up inevitable violence. Deja vu!

Then there's the stereotypical teen girl with a heart of gold who hands out her "favors" as if she is passing out candy. Garfield determines to look after and encourage her as a person of worth.
Read more ›
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