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1984: 60th-Anniversary Edition (Plume) [Paperback]

by George Orwell, Erich Fromm
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4,272 customer reviews)

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Book Description

April 1, 1983 0452262933 978-0452262935 60th Anniversary

View our feature on George Orwell’s 1984.

Written in 1948, 1984 was George Orwell's chilling prophecy about the future. And while 1984 has come and gone, Orwell's narrative is more timely that ever. 1984 presents a "negative utopia," that is at once a startling and haunting vision of the world—so powerful that it is completely convincing from start to finish. No one can deny the power of this novel, its hold on the imaginations of entire generations of readers, or the resiliency of its admonitions—a legacy that seems to grow, not lessen, with the passage of time.


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1984: 60th-Anniversary Edition (Plume) + Brave New World + Fahrenheit 451: A Novel
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Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Among the seminal texts of the 20th century, Nineteen Eighty-Four is a rare work that grows more haunting as its futuristic purgatory becomes more real. Published in 1949, the book offers political satirist George Orwell's nightmare vision of a totalitarian, bureaucratic world and one poor stiff's attempt to find individuality. The brilliance of the novel is Orwell's prescience of modern life--the ubiquity of television, the distortion of the language--and his ability to construct such a thorough version of hell. Required reading for students since it was published, it ranks among the most terrifying novels ever written. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Review

Yet before one has finished reading the nearly bemused first page, it is evident that this is fiction of another order, and presently one makes the distinctly unpleasant discovery that it is not to be satire at all. -- The New York Times Book Review, Mark Schorer --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Product Details

  • Series: Plume
  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Plume; 60th Anniversary edition (April 1, 1983)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0452262933
  • ISBN-13: 978-0452262935
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.3 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4,272 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #7,155 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

GEORGE ORWELL (1903-1950) was born in India and served with the Imperial Police in Burma before joining the Republican Army in the Spanish Civil War. Orwell was the author of six novels as well as numerous essays and nonfiction works.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
630 of 695 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The kind of distressing book you NEED to read... August 7, 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
Eric Arthur Blair was an important English writer that you probably already know by the pseudonym of George Orwell. He wrote quite a few books, but many believe that his more influential ones were "Animal farm" (1944) and "1984" (1948).In those two books he conveyed, metaphorically and not always obviously, what Soviet Russia meant to him.

I would like to make some comments about the second book, "1984". That book was written near his death, when he was suffering from tuberculosis, what might have had a lot to do with the gloominess that is one of the essential characteristics of "1984". The story is set in London, in a nightmarish 1984 that for Orwell might well have been a possibility, writting as he was many years before that date. Or maybe, he was just trying to warn his contemporaries of the dangers of not opposing the Soviet threat, a threat that involved a new way of life that was in conflict with all that the English held dear.

Orwell tried to depict a totalitarian state, where the truth didn't exist as such, but was merely what the "Big Brother" said it was. Freedom was only total obedience to the Party, and love an alien concept, unless it was love for the Party. The story is told from the point of view of Winston Smith, a functionary of the Ministry of Truth whose work involved the "correction" of all records each time the "Big Brother" decided that the truth had changed. The Party slogan said that "Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past", and they applied it constantly by "bringing up to date" the past so as to make it coincide with whatever the Party wanted.

From Winston Smith's point of view, many things that scare us are normal.
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289 of 323 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Four legs good, two legs bad!!!" August 1, 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Animal Farm" by George Orwell was never required reading for me when I was in school, so it took me some time to finally get around to reading it. I found it to be a complete and enjoyable read that had me hooked from the very first sentence. It is an excellent exercise in symbolism and creative imagination. While the book may be a very short read, it brings a whole lot to the table by giving you an interesting take on how history can be reenacted in the most imaginative ways.

The animals on Mr. Jones' farm have had enough of what they deem to be slavery. They're tired of being ordered around by humans while they see no benefits in their daily work. This is all sparked by a dream that the boar, Major, had about a unique place where animals called the shots and never had to be ordered around by humans ever again. He tells them a revolution is very much needed. When Major dies, the animals act quickly and are able to overthrow the alcoholic farmer and his thugs from his very own farm. The pigs are in charge now, as they claim that they are much smarter than the others and know how to lead. What seems to be paradise quickly transforms into another form of slavery altogether enforced by propaganda and threats from the pigs. And yet, the animals do not know any better, as they are deceived by the new system that gives them the illusion that they are better off than they were with Mr. Jones calling the shots.

The book is greatly inspired by real events that went down during the era of communism in Russia, using animals as the actual people. While it helps to know about that time period, the book is written so well that it is easily understood even if you only know a little about what happened during that time.
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124 of 136 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The power of words ... September 15, 2004
Format:Mass Market Paperback
"Animal farm" is to this day one of the best attempts to criticize a totalitarian regime through the means that literature provides: the power of words. George Orwell (1903- 1950) wanted to help others to realize things that for him were evident, and attempted to do so by writing a fable that can easily be read as a satire of the Russian Revolution. Orwell said in an article that "Every line of serious work that I have written since 1936 has been written, directly or indirectly, against totalitarianism and for democratic Socialism, as I understand it. It seems to me nonsense, in a period like our own, to think that one can avoid writing of such subjects. It is simply a question of which side one takes and what approach one follows".

Orwell also pointed out that "Animal Farm was the first book in which I tried, with full consciousness of what I was doing, to fuse political purpose and artistic purpose into one whole". He succeded beyond his wildest expectations, even though at first nobody wanted to publish this work because it was too controversial.

The plot of this book is relatively easy to grasp, and I think that is probably one of the reasons why it is so popular. Some animals decide to take over the conduction of a farm, because they believe there is too much injustice, and that they would improve the situation if they had the power to do so. They make a revolution, and end up evicting Mr. Jones, the owner of the farm. From that moment onwards, the farm is called "Animal farm"...
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Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Wow
Really good book, had to read it for school, but it was really interesting. It gripped me in within the first few chapters.
Published 14 hours ago by J. Griffin
5.0 out of 5 stars Great
This is a classic that must be ready by anyone old enough to read. And if you've already read it, then re-read it.
Published 17 hours ago by East Coast Girl
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome
Fantastic read. Thoroughly enjoyed from start to finish! I couldn't put the book down and I am looking forward to some more orwell novels
Published 22 hours ago by Lewis Hillman
4.0 out of 5 stars Timeless classic
Sometimes it's a big slow, but overall very good read. Interesting and a little scary. Good for a book club because I definitely would have liked to discuss the ending with... Read more
Published 1 day ago by Jennifer N. Graham
5.0 out of 5 stars A Good Political Statement
If you are searching for a book that will make you want to laugh or cry or feel genuine feelings, this book won't please you. However, Orwell does a fantastic job in this book. Read more
Published 2 days ago by Evan
5.0 out of 5 stars Easy to read account of life during the Russian revolution
An incredible read, the author really gives you an intense experience of what life behind soviet doors was like during the Russian revolution, the inequalities and struggles and... Read more
Published 2 days ago by adam
1.0 out of 5 stars I like the book, just not this Kindle edition
Once I read the introduction, and tapped the screen to advance to chapter 1, etc ... it jumped to 40% done, and I had to go back. Read more
Published 2 days ago by David Brant
5.0 out of 5 stars A "should read" for everyone
It's hard to say you "liked" this book, but I feel it's one of those everyone should read, like Orwell's "1984", basically a classic. Read more
Published 3 days ago by Michele Chrzanowski
4.0 out of 5 stars An interesting classic
I read this book for one of my recent school classes. It was interesting and I consider it to be a classic among early 20th century literature, though it is not perfect. Read more
Published 3 days ago by ATOTHEJ4
3.0 out of 5 stars Slow but thought provoking
It was just as I expected reading a book about the pasts future. There are some rough patches you'll have to trudge through but I think it is a must read for high schoolers to tie... Read more
Published 3 days ago by Hayden
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How do you like the Patriot Act now?
It was just recently extended by Obama. of course he determined that you have no e-mail privacy as well and GPS tracking of cell phone users is okay w/o a warrant too.
Jun 22, 2010 by G. Howard |  See all 3 posts
Very Bushian
Republicans are evil, Democrats are evil, blah, blah, blah... You'd think we had our own Big Brother/Emmanuel Goldstein right here in the U.S. Don't you guys see the major conflicts in the book being played out in 'miniature' in our own politics? Dems and Repubs pick a few issues they use to... Read more
Aug 12, 2008 by Amazon Customer |  See all 37 posts
Welcome to the 1984 forum
you don't have a television that can receive the mainstream media and little else?
There's your telescreen right there. It's not yet sending data back on your behaviour (except of course that your cable box sends back which channels you watch when and for how long, whether you obediently watch... Read more
Sep 16, 2010 by J. T. Wenting |  See all 7 posts
Julia
Bethy: You didn't say WHY you hated her (there are any number of reasons why one would). She is not a "hero" -- there are none in this book; at best she is one of the struggle rabble ("proles" who a a group are having their humanity squeezed out of them by a social structure... Read more
Jul 8, 2008 by Robert Boyle |  See all 10 posts
Lack of quality control in Kindle ebooks - 1984
I concur. The double spacing, areas of font size changes, and lack of a table of contents are UNACCEPTABLE for the price.
Sep 14, 2010 by D. OBrien |  See all 7 posts
big brother's #1 weapon is.................. Be the first to reply
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