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2031: The Singularity Pogrom Paperback – August 26, 2010

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Editorial Reviews

From the Author

No one really has the guts to say it, but if we could make better human beings by knowing how to add genes, why shouldn't we?
---- James Watson, Co-discoverer of the structure of DNA
My new novel, 2031: The Singularity Pogrom, takes Watson's idea and raises the ante. Why not integrate artificial and human intelligence in these "better human beings"? Would the result continue to be human or perhaps something dangerous beyond our understanding?

Welcome to the violent world of 2031.

About the Author

Dan Ronco's expertise in engineering and computer science infuses his fast-paced speculative thriller 2031: The Singularity Pogrom with detail and authenticity. Ronco returns to the violent, near-future world brought to life in his first two novels, PeaceMaker and Unholy Domain. Piers Anthony called PeaceMaker, "Exciting, violent, thoughtful and unfortunately true to life - a powerhouse of computer adventure." Simon Wood, the Anthony Award winning author, said "Dan Ronco fills the gap left by Philip K. Dick with Unholy Domain."
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 366 pages
  • Publisher: All Things That Matter Press (August 26, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0984621601
  • ISBN-13: 978-0984621606
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,097,756 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

I was raised in Newark, NJ, then and now a tough place to grow up. My parents were hard-working people who wanted the best for my sister and me. I was in and out of trouble, but somehow did well enough to be accepted into the local college (now New Jersey Institute of Technology). I had great friends --- like brothers --- and we still remain close after all these years.

After graduating college with a degree in chemical engineering, I attended Columbia University on a fellowship and earned a masters degree in nuclear engineering. It was my ticket out of Newark; I went to work for GE in Schenectady designing nuclear reactors for submarines, but it did not fit my temperment. On the other hand, developing computer programs to support the design effort was great fun. I had found my calling.

I also found the love of my life in Schenectady. By sheer dumb luck, I moved to a garden apartment complex and took an apartment below two pretty girls. One invited me up for a drink; the other girl I married.

1972 was a busy year: Lin and I were married, I earned a masters in computer science at RPI and accepted a job as a consultant with Arthur Andersen. Lin and I traveled the country as Andersen sent me out on consulting assignments over the next four years. I loved the work and we both enjoyed the traveling, but when our first daughter was born in San Diego, we decided it was time to put down roots.

We moved to north Jersey, had our second daughter, then moved to south Jersey, where our son was born. I continued working as a consultant for the next twenty years, traveling maybe 25% of the time. These were busy years, but I loved my family and enjoyed my work. I became a partner at one of the large accounting/consulting firms, managed a software consulting business for five years with two partners, and then joined Microsoft to build a consulting business along the east coast.

As much as I enjoyed helping clients build better software, something was missing. For years, I had been thinking about writing novels, but there was never any time. I wasn't getting any younger, so I left the consulting business and dedicated myself to becoming a novelist.

And I had an idea.

What if a great (fictional) software company lost an anti-trust lawsuit and was ripped apart by the DOJ? What if the leaders of this once-great company decided to have their revenge by building an intelligent, deadly software predator into their flagship software product? That's the premise of PeaceMaker, my first novel.

Having an idea is one thing, but writing a novel is a whole different issue. It's a marathon, especially for a first-time novelist. I lost count of the time I put into PeaceMaker, but I'm proud of the final product. When Winterwolf decided to publish it, I was thrilled. The critics reviewed it favorably, and the vast majority of readers enjoyed it as well.

By the way, PeaceMaker is now available on my website (www.danronco.com) as a free download. Just pop over and begin reading. Lots of book reviews and cool videos there, too.

My second novel, Unholy Domain, was released in 2008 by Kunati Publishing. Here's the concept: David Brown, a brilliant but troubled young man, was raised in the dark shadow of his long-dead father, a software genius who unleashed a computer virus that murdered thousands. When David receives a decade-old email that indicates his father may have been framed, he plunges into a gut-wrenching race with the real killers to discover the truth about his father ' and himself.

Released August, 2010, my third novel, 2031: The Singularity Pogrom explores humanity's next great evolutionary challenge. Set in a violent near-future,2031 is a clash of wills between software genius Ray Brown, his gifted son David, and megolomaniac Dianne Morgan, Ray's one-time lover.

This section turned out to be longer than I planned, but I hope you found it interesting.

And there won't be a rewrite.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By C. R. D'Agostino on September 24, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The best in Dan Ronco's techno-thriller trilogy, 2031: The Singularity Pogrom brings computer genius Ray Brown's struggle against the sinister and deadly Dianne Morgan to a violent and powerful conclusion. This time Morgan aims to merge human and artificial intelligence to create a super society, and her manipulation of Brown's gifted son and inhumanly talented grandson makes stopping Morgan an extremely personal mission for Brown. In an exciting, fast-paced narrative exploding with Ronco's gift of imagination, readers are treated to unforgettable characters, a full-fledged, realistic futuristic setting, and the haunting prospect of humanity threatened by the misuse of artificial intelligence.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alex Hutchinson VINE VOICE on December 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
2031: The Singularity Pogrom

After my own attempts at writing fiction came to a dead end, I've had a kind of chip on my shoulder when it came to reading or reviewing the work of others. So when Dan Ronco asked if I would take a look at his new novel 2031: The Singularity Pogrom there was an audible hesitation. Don't get me wrong Dan is a great writer. His previous book Unholy Domain was one of my favorite reads and since this new book followed the same storyline I felt compelled to take a look. I'm glad that I did.

The pogrom massacre begins in the year 2031. This when the Domain, a sort of techno-religion, secretly declares war on the rest of humanity. Their ultimate goal is the singularity. The Singularity is the moment when human intelligence fuses with artificial intelligence to create an altogether new being. Their enemies are Ray Brown and his sons. Ray created Sentinel, an AI that holds the key to creating a singularity where as his son David is the only human able to merge with this intelligence.

2031 is an action novel with fast moving storylines heading towards a worldwide war. At moments it slows down enough for the relevant characters to ponder and debate their decisions and beliefs concerning this new direction for humanity. I was repeatedly shocked by the ruthlessness of the Domain's leader Diane Morgan who was perfectly willing to manipulate and sacrifice absolutely anyone who could further her ambitions. There is nothing better than an antagonist that you can hate one moment and admire the next.

The overall work is a playground for the ethical battles that we are already starting to face as a people.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By JustinDwinnell on September 19, 2010
Format: Paperback
Fast paced, realistic future setting, indepth characters, an amazing if horrifying exploration of artificial intelligence infused in human evolution, 2031: The Singulary Pogrom brings the issue into focus with electrifying realism. A must read novel, riveting, emotionally compelling and a thoroughly entertaining, informative voyage into the future of mankind. This is a five star read.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Cheryl Koch VINE VOICE on November 28, 2010
Format: Paperback
The year is 2025. It has been thirteen years since; Ray Brown attempted to stop Dianne Morgan and the computer virus, Peacemaker. Ray was unsuccessful and therefore is paying for it. Dianne sent Ray to a fairly secluded island. The only other person on the island is a man named Paul Martino. The first inhabitants to arrive on the island are androids and guards out to eliminate Ray and Paul. Luck is on their side. Ray and Paul are rescued by an African warlord by the name of Nkumah. Nkumah wants Ray to help him stop Dianne once and for all. Will Ray finally be able to stop Dianne and be reunited with his family or will he die trying?

2031: The Singularity Pogrom is the third novel from author, Dan Ronco. I got a taste of what Mr. Ronco had to offer with Unholy Domain, the second book. Peacemaker is the first. 2031: The Singularity Pogrom was just as good. This is saying something as sometimes second and third novels can never live up to the first.

I was cheering for Ray the whole time. Ray had so much personality and he is someone you can get behind. I like the element of suspense. You never truly knew if the good guys were really good or bad guys. There is lots of action taking place in this story.

There is no current technological futuristic sci-fi series out that I am familiar with that is as good as these books. Fans of this series will be pleased with 2031: The Singularity Pogrom.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Kara J. Jorges VINE VOICE on December 21, 2010
Format: Paperback
Framed by his megalomaniacal ex-lover, Ray Brown took the fall when the Internet crashed and millions died. The world now believes Ray is dead, but Dianne Morgan, the woman he once loved, knows better. For thirteen years, she has held him and his best friend Paul captive on an island, hoping that one day he would change his mind and share her vision for the future of the world. Knowing there is no escape, Ray kills time with a daily running regimen that serves him well the day a hovercraft appears to rescue him and Paul. Of course, it is not without strings, and Nkuma, their rescuer, wants Ray to join the fight against the Domain, which is taking over the world.

The Domain is Dianne Morgan's brainchild, and billions worldwide have joined their ranks. Domain citizens are not free, living under constant monitoring, and having the course of their lives guided for them, but they live a fairly cushy existence, free of diseases and disabilities. Domain children are created in test tubes to ensure an ideal child every time out, and their genetics are manipulated for maximum effect. But Dianne's biggest dream, and one she is on the cusp of realizing, is a merging of human and artificial intelligence. Her scientists have isolated a particular rare gene that makes a deep connection between humans and computers possible, but thus far, the only people who seem to have the gene are Ray Brown and his sons, David and Brian. Though he hates Dianne, David is a Domain citizen, though his complacency gets stripped away when he learns the depths Dianne will plumb to get her way. Brian shuns the Domain, but gets caught up in Dianne's plans when she throws him and her daughter together for nefarious purposes.
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