21 Hours At Munich 1976 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(19) IMDb 6.4/10
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Chilling account of events that shocked the world at the 20th Olympic Olympic games in Munich, West Germany, when a gang of eight Arab terrorists killed two Israeli team members and took nine others hostage. They demanded the release of over 200 Arabs held in Israeli prisons, but Israel refuses to negotiate with terrorism, leading to the eventual deaths of all of the hostages at a desperate shootout at the airport. The film is a heart-wrenching depiction of courage and heroism in the face of overwhelming odds.

Starring:
William Holden, Shirley Knight
Runtime:
1 hour 42 minutes

21 Hours At Munich

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Product Details

Genres Sports, Drama, Thriller
Director William A. Graham
Starring William Holden, Shirley Knight
Supporting actors Franco Nero, Anthony Quayle, Richard Basehart, Noel Willman, Georg Marischka, Else Quecke, Michael Degen, Djamchid 'Jim' Soheili, Walter Kohut, Jan Niklas, Ernest Lenart, Osman Ragheb, James Hurley, Franz Rudnick, Heinz Feldhaus, Martin Gilat, Paul L. Smith, Günther Maria Halmer
Studio MGM
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 4, 2006
Format: DVD
I can tell you up front that "21 Hours at Munich" is a much more detailed look at that Olympic massacre in 1972 than you will find in Steven Spielberg's film "Munich." In point of fact, Spielberg is not telling the story of what happened on September 5, 1972 in his film but exploring its aftermath. This made for television movie aired in 1976 (in November, so it was after the Montreal Summer Olympics that year). The release of the film two decades later was certainly motivated by the impending release of Spielberg's Oscar nominated film, but since it is an earnest dramatization of the events of that day, it will make an appropriate counterpart to the theatrical film.

The screenplay by Howard Fast (writer of the novel "Spartacus") and Edward Hume ("The Day After") is based on Serge Groussard's book "The Blood of Israel and focuses on what happened in Munich, part of what was then West Germany, that day in September when a group of Palestinian terrorists calling themselves Black September invaded the dormitory rooms of the Israeli athletes, killing two of them and taking another nine hostage. Issa (Franco Nero), the leader of the terrorists, demands the release of 250 Palestinian prisoners being held by Israel, but Prime Minister Golda Meir (Else Quecke) flatly refused to deal with the terrorists. This left it to the German government to try and rescue the hostages. Chief of Police Manfred Schreiber (William Holden) became the point man for their efforts, although Chancellor Willy Brandt (Richard Basehart) and Interior Minister Bruno Merk (Noel Willman) are involved in the fatal decisions as the lives of Jewish men are once again in the hands of the German government, this time with the whole world watching.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By River R on January 6, 2013
Format: DVD
The best thing about this movie is that it was filmed at the actual places where the events took place. It is a very poorly acted movie. I suggest the documentary "One Day in September" which has a lot of actual news footage from the incident.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Silver Screen Videos on December 25, 2013
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Television has always been quick to capitalize on real-life crime tragedies, and few such events were as earthshaking as the kidnapping of Israeli athletes at the 1972 Munich Olympics and the crime's eventual tragic resolution. 21 Hours at Munich is a surprisingly well made recreation of those events that boasts a cast considerably above the TV-movie norm.

William Holden stars as the German cop in charge of the investigation and negotiations, while Franco Nero plays the chief terrorist. Unlike Steven Spielberg's Munich, this movie concentrates solely on the crime itself, beginning by showing how the terrorists easily enter the Olympic Village and are able to subdue most of the members of the Israeli team. From there, it's a cat-and-mouse game of negotiations and threats between terrorists and police.

Holden is solid, and his casting was undoubtedly a coup for a TV movie of the week (the film was made immediately before he got his last Oscar nomination for Network). He makes no pretense at speaking with a German accent which some may find disconcerting, although if you are interested in what he is saying it shouldn't matter. His character is well aware of the importance of what they do and how the world will view it, which leads to eventual bickering among the police, military, and political leaders (including Richard Basehart as Willy Brandt).

Similarly, Nero is solid and grounded. The movie wisely avoids turning him into a wide-eyed fanatic; instead, he is a professionally determined man with a dangerous political agenda. By keeping the two leads as competent, solid professionals, the movie is able to build suspense, even if the eventual resolution is well known in advance.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By lplynn on January 1, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
After watching this movie for about 40 minutes, I had to turn it off because I was so distracted by the miscasting of William Holden as the German Chief of Police and Franco Nero as the Leader of (and Chief Negotiator for) the Palestinian Terrorists that I couldn't concentrate on the story being told. Maybe my standzads are too high, but when actors portray characters of another country, I expect to hear accents and see mannerisms characteristic of that country. Neither actor delivered in this regard. William Holden played William Holden in this movie; every time I heard him speak, I had to remind myself that he was supposed to be portraying Germany's Police Chief, and not some American diplomat assigned to help resolve the Munich crisis. Nero similarly failed to present a believable character; rather his French accent combined with the numerous close-ups of him (& his blue eyes) made me think of his role as Lancelot in Camelot (a characterization in which he was very convincing). The movie (at least what I saw of it) did have some good points in authentically "re-creating" the clothing styles of the 1970's and in its "snapshots" of the Olympics environment, including its wide-angle aerial views of the Olympic Village & event spectators. I also thought that the performances of Shirley Knight as a representative of the Olympics Committee and the woman who played Golda Meir were pretty credible.
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