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21st Century Astronomy (Full Second Edition) Paperback – December 21, 2006

ISBN-13: 978-0393924435 ISBN-10: 0393924432 Edition: Full Second Edition

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 726 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company; Full Second Edition edition (December 21, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393924432
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393924435
  • Product Dimensions: 0.9 x 0.1 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.5 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,487,332 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Jeff Hester is professor of physics and astronomy at Arizona State University. He studies the interstellar medium in the Milky Way and external galaxies, the structure of the diffuse ISM, and supernova remnants.

David Burstein is professor of physics and astronomy at Arizona State University. His research focuses on the structure and evolution of galaxies, stellar evolution, and cosmology.

George Blumenthal is chancellor at the University of California–Santa Cruz, where he has been a professor of astronomy and astrophysics since 1972. He received his BS degree from the University of Wisconsin–Milwaukee and his PhD in physics from the University of California–San Diego. As a theoretical astrophysicist, George’s research encompasses several broad areas, including the nature of the dark matter that constitutes most of the mass in the universe, the origin of galaxies and other large structures in the universe, the earliest moments in the universe, astrophysical radiation processes, and the structure of active galactic nuclei such as quasars. Besides teaching and conducting research, he has served as Chair of the UC–Santa Cruz Astronomy and Astrophysics Department, has chaired the Academic Senate for both the UC–Santa Cruz campus and the entire University of California system, and has served as the faculty representative to the UC Board of Regents.

Ronald Greeley is professor of geological sciences at Arizona State University. His current research is focused on gaining an understanding of planetary surface processes and geological histories.

Brad Smith is a retired professor of planetary science. He has served as an associate professor of astronomy at New Mexico State University, a professor of planetary sciences and astronomy at the University of Arizona, and as a research astronomer at the University of Hawaii. Through his interest in Solar System astronomy, he has participated as a team member or imaging team leader on several U.S. and international space missions, including Mars Mariners 6, 7, and 9; Viking; Voyagers 1 and 2; and the Soviet Vega and Phobos missions. He later turned his interest to extrasolar planetary systems, investigating circumstellar debris disks as a member of the Hubble Space Telescope NICMOS experiment team. Brad has four times been awarded the NASA Medal for Exceptional Scientific Achievement. He is a member of the IAU Working Group for Planetary System Nomenclature and is Chair of the Task Group for Mars Nomenclature.

Howard Voss is professor of physics emeritus at Arizona State University and has been active in the American Association of Physics Teachers and the American Institute of Physics.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Kevin Marshall on April 6, 2008
Format: Paperback
I am teaching an introductory astronomy course this semester, and chose to use a different text since that is what others before me had used. Early on, the publisher sent a free copy of this book to me. I liked it so much that I ended up using it to prepare many of my lectures, and when I teach this course again I suspect that this will become the new text. The overall tone of the book is very good, presenting scientific material in a well thought-out fashion that doesn't talk down to the reader. The figures are clear, and often address common misconceptions. The material is also very up to date, addressing hot topics like Pluto's status as a planet, dark energy, WMAP results, etc. The only thing I don't like about the book is that the chapter titles and section headings are often complete sentences. For example, the chapter on the Sun is called "The Sun is an ordinary G star," instead of just calling it "The Sun." Strange, but overall an excellent book.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Rich on February 6, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Very well written astronomy textbook. I attended a week-long Elderhostel seminar on astronomy after reading this book and heard almost nothing I hadn't already read in it. Astronomy is a difficult subject to wrap your mind around, but 21st Century Astronomy is a tremendous help. Be sure to do all the exercises and problems at the end of each chapter. That's how half the learning takes place. Engineers, mathematicians and physicists will want to dig deeper, but this text takes the reader about as far as possible with only a good grounding in algebra. I heartily recommend it.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I read this for my astronomy introduction class (stars, galaxies, and the cosmos) and it was just fascinating. It's not easy - there's math and hard science in this book - but it's incredibly informative and thorough. I'm really glad I read this.
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By Carlos Adame on October 26, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Contains a lot if information for the basic of astronomy. The only quizzes can be very helpful for memorizing and understand the mains points in a chapter.
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