21st Century Pastor: A Vision Based on the Ministry of Paul and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $12.99
  • Save: $2.05 (16%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: This book has already been well loved by someone else and that love shows. It MIGHT have highlighting, underlining, be missing a dust jacket, or SLIGHT water damage, but over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

21st Century Pastor Paperback – April 20, 1996


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.94
$4.98 $0.01


Frequently Bought Together

21st Century Pastor + Preventing Ministry Failure: A ShepherdCare Guide for Pastors, Ministers and Other Caregivers
Price for both: $25.34

Buy the selected items together
If you buy a new print edition of this book (or purchased one in the past), you can buy the Kindle edition for only $2.99 (Save 50%). Print edition purchase must be sold by Amazon. Learn more.


Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Zondervan (April 20, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0310201543
  • ISBN-13: 978-0310201540
  • Product Dimensions: 5.4 x 0.7 x 8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,143,906 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

The third millennium. It's a time of tremendous opportunity for the church--and tremendous challenge. More than ever, pastors need a model for ministry that can equip them for the rigors of a restless, increasingly secularized culture. In the 21st Century Pastor, David Fisher explores the apostle Paul's concept of ministry to offer a paradigm that is both biblical and relevant. Paul's view is fleshed out with examples from Fisher's own twenty-five years of pastoral experience, presenting a roadmap for today's pastor that is scholarly, practical, dynamic, and inspiring. The 21st Century Pastor first addressees crucial issues of pastoral identity, the significance of geography, time, and ecclesiology. It then explores Paul's metaphors for ministry (jars of clay, farmers and builders, servants and stewards, and others) to reveal an accurate portrait of an effective, biblical pastor--the kind who will speak to the heart of modern culture rather than languish on its fringes. Filling the rare role of a pastor to pastors, Fisher's sage insights help pastors answer their own identity questions, empowering them to minister to a deeply needy society. Says Fisher, "Pastors who know what time it is will, in the name and power of God, create communities of faith where the values of the Gospel are embraced, taught, and lived out."

About the Author

David Fisher is senior pastor of Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York. He was formerly senior pastor of Colonial Church in Edina, MN.

More About the Author

David Fisher is senior pastor of Plymouth Church in Brooklyn, New York. He was formerly senior pastor of Colonial Church in Edina, MN.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
6
4 star
4
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 10 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Jonathan on August 15, 2003
Format: Paperback
I am a student at Moody Bible Institute in their Pastoral Studies program. I stumbled upon this book while doing research into "What is a pastor?" I found Fisher's cander refreshing and myself identifying with many of his experiences...and applauding his solutions. He writes from a conservative viewpoint with the Bible as his authority. This book was helpful to encourage me in the difficult task ahead of pastoring a church in this pluralistic, postmodern, and pagan society, and would recommend it to any aspiring Christian shepherd!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 27, 1998
Format: Paperback
I had four important and definitive books in my life. First of all the Bible. In my conversion "Christian Counter culture"by John Stott. During my growth "Authentic Life", by Ray stedman. And during my bigest crisis in ministry this book of Pastor Fisher
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By B. D. Weimer on May 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
Pastor Fisher's book is no doubt of great assistance to new pastors, who need a more practical and comprehensive preparation for the ministry than provided in seminary.

However, it is also of great assistance to the laity who want to better understand and support their pastor. The pastor's job can be a lonely one. It is in the interest of the entire congregation for their pastor to succeed.

David Fisher is the ideal person to write such a book. He has many years of experience, pastoring churches throughout the United States. (I was honored to have him as my senior pastor many years ago in New Hope, Minnesota.) He brings to the job a refreshing mix of friendliness and intellectual curiosity.

Though this book is now 10 years old, its timeless principles may well assist churches for another 90 years ... when God willing devout pastors and congregations throughout the world will be preparing for the 22nd century.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By William T. Brewer on February 12, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Part 1 of the Pastor deals with four questions for the minister: Who Am I? What's my address? What time is it? And who's church is this? The first deals with pastoral identity. The second addresses the importance of geography. The third focuses on the larger culture. And the last deals with the necessity of a sound ecclesiology. In Part II, Fisher elaborates the pastor's identity using metaphors drawn from Paul's epistles: "Christ's prisoners," "jars of clay," "God's penmen," "father and mother," "farmers and builders," "servants and stewards," and "ambassadors and preachers."

Two themes are most prominent in Pastor: (1) the privilege and joy of being a pastor and (2) the burdens and frequent despair of shepherding God's people. Pastoring a church means being intimately connected to people in deeply fulfilling ways, but it also has a dark side. Clergy abuse has two dimensions. In the popular mind, it usually refers to pastors who abuse their privileges and mistreat the church and its members. A more common reality though is of the clergy being abused by the church and larger society. Fisher deals with both kinds of abuse, but he is most memorable for his treatment of the latter. The percentage of unhappy clergy is large and growing. Low self-esteem is the number one problem of pastors, followed by depression. Ministry is one of the most troubled professions in the U.S. Cultural influences that diminish the office of pastor and disparage its holders are one cause. Neglect of pastoral and ecclesiological theology is another. Another factor is seminary education that fails to prepare pastors for the harsh realities of pastoral work.

Fisher is correct in grounding pastoral theology in the larger theology of the church.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
In an age of increasingly `burnt-out' pastors and ministers, declining ministry initiates and increased secularism, there is a need for the Church to reconnect with the foundations of ministry. While there have been various books written addressing these needs at different levels, David Fisher's book, 'The 21st century pastor', gives a fresh and balanced perspective between the human and divine elements of pastoral ministry. These pages are filled with his own extensive personal experience and practice, but also driven and seen through a theological-biblical foundation drawn from a Christological framework and the life and words of the apostle Paul. Fisher aims to encourage and challenge those entering, and already, in pastoral ministry, addressing issues that are rarely dealt with in one's preparation for pastoral ministry in theological education. This book is a most welcome and needed change for those of us, whether novice or veteran, in the world of ministry.

Fisher's purpose is driven by an age of increasing secularism. With increasing secularism, Fisher recognises the declining place of the Church within modern society; as such, in the midst of this decline, Fisher articulates the need for pastoral ministry to step up to the plate or lose its impact upon this generation. One aspect Fisher highlights is the change within pastoral ministry from being a theologically-driven practice to an organisational-driven practice, essentially, a change from a divine foundation to a human business philosophy. He states that "the result is, more often than not, a failure of theological-biblical integration and, at the heart of it, a base for ministry that is not properly biblical or theological.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again