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24-Karat Kids: A Novel Hardcover – June 13, 2006


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Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

When Dr. Shelley Green joins Madison Pediatrics, a medical practice catering to the rich, peculiar parents of the Upper East Side of Manhattan, this self-described "schlumpy girl from Jackson Heights" is unprepared for the self-centered eccentrics who parade through her office. First-time collaborators Goldstein and Stuart have created them all in this chick-out-of-water comedy: a six-year-old with strep devastated to miss her Bergdorf manicure, a show-biz mom who wants a nose job for her eight-month-old son, and ultrapampered busybody Amanda Walker, who takes Shelley under her gilded wing. In the name of developing the "persona" to fit in with the posh parents from her practice, Shelley dives into the world of designer stores, spends weekends in the Hamptons with Amanda and her upscale friends and considers a dalliance with rich, hunky Josh Potter—a man entirely unlike her schoolteacher fiancé, Arthur. Of course, Shelley eventually has to decide what really matters to her, but before she does there are plenty of delicious laughs and devious betrayals among the Dior-and-diapers set. (June)
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Review

"Feeling poorly? Treat yourself to a full dose of 24-Karat Kids.   A nostrum, a kick, a pick-me-up--so pick it up and take it home. Call me in the morning if you can't stop laughing."
 
--GREGORY MAGUIRE, author of  the New York Times bestsellers Wicked and Son of A Witch
 
"The most fun I've ever had in a doctor's office"--Nancy Lieberman, author of Admissions
 
"Shelley Green is one of the funniest, warmest heroines I've ever met.  I was rooting for her all the way!"--Vicki Lewis Thompson, author of the New York Times bestselling Nerd series
 
"Dr. Judy Goldstein and Sebastian Stuart are writing about a milieu I know well, and their take on it is fresh and very entertaining."
--Woody Allen
 
"Dr. Judy Goldstein and Sebastian Stuart have written a very funny and occasionally biting fictional account of a young doctor's plunge into big time Manhattan pediatrics and upper East side glitz.  It has the ring of truth and I found it thoroughly entertaining." --Jonathan Newhouse, Conde Nast International
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 292 pages
  • Publisher: St. Martin's Press; First Edition edition (June 13, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0312343272
  • ISBN-13: 978-0312343279
  • Product Dimensions: 5.8 x 1.1 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (21 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,208,771 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

We all have book in which we can relate to the main character.
Nancy J. Gorman
That said, the plot was entirely too predictable, the end of the book was rushed and the ending was ridiculous.
Chic
I thought this was a fun, well-written, pleasant & satisfying read.
Chick Lit World

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Amy Gold on December 18, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I rely heavily on Amazon Reader reviews to plan my reading list, but I'm going to respectfully disagree on this.

Here's what I think happened: Judy Goldstein read "The Devil Wears Prada" and "The Nanny Diaries" and said "Hey kids ! Let's re-write these books but from a pediatrician's point of view" Then she thought of every funny case she's ever seen and exaggerated it, and changed the names. Then she thought of some ridiculous plot that allowed her to show off her extensive knowledge of fancy boutiques on the Hamptons.

Now I have nothing against good chick-lit, but there was NOTHING to this book. The heroine was *so* perfect, I found her unbelievable. Actually Goldstein seemed afraid to include any characters that weren't basically amiable (Ira goes on gambling sponsored coke binges? How eccentric!) Even the bird is quirky.

There are so many random threads to this book: the receptionist has chemo and loses her hair, well obviously then she's going to focus all her attention on her opera for kids CD, and never mention the cancer again. Someone suggests Shelley loses a few pounds and POOF ! she goes on a diet and she loses 30 pounds and that is that. Oh Fran Templar is at a party? Let's run around looking for her and then drop it all of a sudden because we remember that she's not actually a character in this book.

Usually I'll give any book 100 pages, and if I don't like it, I'll put it down guilt-free. However I felt compelled to finish 24 Karat kids simply so I could write this review. I'm not going to ruin the highly predictable ending but it seemed to me like the author looked at the book, said "Ooh look 200 pages, I'm done now!" and typed a final 3 page chapter that tied everything up.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By JJ Stark VINE VOICE on July 19, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I don't know anything about "Mary Sue", but I thought this was a fun, well-written, pleasant & satisfying read. The characters and tone of the book reminded me at times of best selling "chick-lit" books DEVIL WEARS PRADA, THE SECOND ASSISTANT, and THE NANNY DIARIES. I definitely thought that this one belonged right up there with those, as one of the better chick-lit books I've read (especially considering it was written by a NY Pediatrician and NOT an established and/or trained author).

As the heroine of the story, Shelley is both likable and REAL. I never got the impression that she was perfect, or even close to perfection. Yes, her patients loved her and yes, some of the solutions to her patients' ailments were easily resolved, but it's a fun, FICTIONAL NOVEL!!! And Shelley did make some mistakes along the way as she adjusted to her new lifestyle. Jumping to conclusions and misdiagnosing a favorite patient before all the test results were available, choices in her love-life, a change in living arrangements, her shopping habits, even in her choice of "extra-curricular activities." As Shelley makes mistakes and uses poor judgment, you come to love her more since these are the very things that make her all the more real and human to readers. For years Shelley was the "plain" girl, the "smart" girl, the "reliable" girl, whose mother was always (and still is!) shouting SUS (Stand Up Straight!) at her. For the first time in her life, she's out having fun and behaving like someone she used to only envy. Are there lessons to be learned along the way? Of course there are, and by the end of the book, Shelley has learned a few of those and takes a good hard look at the life she's created for herself.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By anonymous on July 26, 2007
Format: Paperback
trust me, this is a great one!- i've read all the chick lit authors and in this genre, this is my favourite book so far!- it is extremely well written and is clever and fun- i found it totally rivetting anf interesting- i fell in love with the main character, shelley and her boyfriend and her family- they were so believable- i could not put it down, read it in 2 days- and i actually missed reading about shelley a week after i finished it, even while reading another book- (which wasn't as good)- very bright authors which shows in their writing skill and diction etc- i can't wait for their next collaboration!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Avid Reader on December 2, 2007
Format: Paperback
I couldn't get through this book. I know it's chick-lit and I have to put on my chick-lit goggles , but even so- there is good chick-lit and there is bad chick-lit. This is really bad chick-lit! The character are cardboard cut-outs that I couldn't care less about. Everyone is so stereotypical, the situations are so unbelievable yet the outcomes are so predictable.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Dr. Cathy Goodwin TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 1, 2006
Format: Hardcover
24-Karat Kids doesn't promise to solve anyone's problems or even offer an insightful literary experience. From the pink cartoon-y cover, it's pretty obvious that we're in for a chick-lit-lite novel.

As others have noted, we get a little more. I don't have kids and I was fascinated by the brief references to childhood development, not to mention the insights into the busy practice. Heroine Shelley just came from a tough residency, so there's no surprise about her ability to deal with patients in a chic upper East Side practice. I especially noted her sardonic assessment of one difficult patient: in a welfare clinic, she'd make a referral to Child Protective Services.

I don't agree with concerns about the author's childless state. Cardiologists don't always have heart disease. Ophthamologists can have perfect vision and oncologists can be cancer-free.

As a career consultant, I was impressed with the author's insight into success. After years of debt and med student deprivation, our heroine now experiments with her new self. She begins to enjoy clothes, fun and new people. Most new professionals won't experience such a dramatic shift, of course, but they'll often begin experimenting with new hairstyles and wardrobes. I saw similar trends among doctoral students who became assistant professors -- and in business schools, they were well-paid.

As a dog owner, I found similarities between pediatricians and veterinarians. In my urban dog park, we have homeless and low-income dog owners, as well as upscale Microsoft employees. I've learned that "good" dog owners don't come from a particular social or economic class. Some upscale, educated owners can't be bothered to make sure their dog gets exercise and attention.
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