25th Hour 2003 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(218) IMDb 7.7/10
Available in HD

A convicted drug dealer reevaluates his life before facing his jail term.

Starring:
Edward Norton, Philip Seymour Hoffman
Runtime:
2 hours 15 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

25th Hour

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Spike Lee
Starring Edward Norton, Philip Seymour Hoffman
Supporting actors Barry Pepper, Rosario Dawson, Anna Paquin, Brian Cox, Tony Siragusa, Levan Uchaneyshvili, Tony Devon, Misha Kuznetsov, Isiah Whitlock Jr., Michael Genet, Patrice O'Neal, Al Palagonia, Aaron Stanford, Marc H. Simon, Armando Riesco, Brad Williams, Rodney 'Bear' Jackson, Keith Nobbs
Studio Touchstone Pictures
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 48 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Mark D Burgh on August 5, 2004
Format: DVD
Spike Lee's film of Michael Benioff's novel 25th Hour is one of the strongest of the neo-noir films of the last few years, and one of the few films to address the corruption of dealing drugs and the breakdown of culture symbolized by the WTC site. Edward Norton plays Montgomery Brogan, a heroin dealer who must report to the Otisville Federal Prison in the morning. Monty's life until this point has been a dream; he lives with a beautiful woman, drives a cool car, and gets into all the clubs, but financing this life is heroin and the Russian Mafia.

Edward Norton gives a typical strong performance - I'd love to see him and Johnny Depp in a film - making Monty a rich character who understands his own self-delusions. Barry Pepper and the ever wonderful Phillip Hoffman play Monty's more conventional friends, Slattery and Alinsky, the former a Wall-Street cowboy, and the latter a repressed English teacher in love with one of his students. Rosanna Dawson plays Monty's woman with understated power and sorrow.

Monty's final day of freedom plays out in clubs, parks, bars, and his memories, which Spike Lee weaves seamlessly in and out of the narrative, sparing us a moralistic explanation for Monty, a nice boy, ending up becoming a drug dealer, but showing us instead the parts of Monty's life that mean something to him: finding an abused pit bull, meeting Naturale, getting busted and interrogated by arrogant DEA agents.

The rant that Monty gives to his reflection is right out of David Benioff's book, nearly word-for-word, so stop blaming Spike Lee, and besides it's a great set piece, expressing Monty's self-loathing at the city which will go on despite him.
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24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 21, 2003
Format: DVD
I am not a big fan of Spike Lee and I do not usually write reviews for movies. But after watching this film, I was inspired to do so. This is one of the best movies I have ever seen. Edward Norton plays his role to perfection. His supporting cast does an excellent job at bringing out his exceptional acting skills. The few montage sequences in the film were humerous as well as though-provoking. This is one of those movies that will stay in your mind long after you view it. I highly recommend this film to anyone who enjoys a good drama. I have a new found respect for Spike Lee.
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Format: DVD
One of the many things that make 25th hour such a special film to me is how Benioff and Lee didn't attempt to cram too many events into this plot. This film does take place in just one day, and it's a perfect snapshot of the lead protagonist Monty Brogan's thoughts and actions in that final day before he begins a 7 year jail sentence for dealing heroin, expertly put together by David Benioff and Spike Lee. We see Brogan (superbly played by Edward Norton) walking his dog, talking to his girlfriend, having a meal with his father, going out to a club with his friends, preparing to go to jail and being driven there. It's not over the top, it isn't brash, but it does do what is necessary.

Brogan is clearly worried and regretful. This is faultlessly portrayed by the mirror scene, in which he rants incessantly about the variety of people populating New York, and then realizes that he only has himself to blame for the situation he is in. It's such a human moment, since how many people can honestly say that they have never chosen to blame others, and take their anger out in a vicious way, even if it is just personal thoughts? But it isn't just Monty who feels regret, virtually every other character we focus on does, Monty's father is weighed down by his former alcoholism, and he partly holds himself responsible for Monty's fate. And so do Monty's friends, not preventing him from his choice to deal drugs.

Monty Brogan is not really shown in a 'good' or 'bad' light. Norton plays him as a normal person. He's easy to relate to, and it's a reminder of how anyone can turn out depending on what choices they make. His choice of drug dealing is looked down upon, the interrogators ridicule him, but that is only in the context of drug dealing, not as a normal person.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Samuel McKewon on April 17, 2003
Format: DVD
Spike Lee's "The 25 Hour" is the story of a New York drug dealer's long last night of freedom before a seven-year prison stint. It is a sad movie for a bunch of reasons, but most notably for the way the Monty Brogan (Edward Norton) wastes his final night in a deafening, public night club, with childhood friends he no longer really knows, and a girlfriend he no longer trusts. By the following morning, Monty knows some things that might have changed that final night for the better, but then Monty's whole life has played out that way, learning things after the fact. It's why he's going to prison.
Edward Norton is entrenched in this kind of character -- a smart, quick-talking brooder, aware of his risks, but willing to roll the dice. But much like Norton's torn characters of "Fight Club" and "American History X," Monty senses something lacking about his masculinity; it isn't the length of time in jail that worries him, it's the first night. He rubs his pretty boy face, pretty certain he'll be raped or killed. His Russian mobster boss tells him to beat someone up, and bad, or else. "The only thing I learned about prison," the mobster says, "is that I don't like prison."
Monty gathers two old friends, one a Jewish literature teacher, Jacob, (Phillip Seymour Hoffman), the other a hopped-up stockbroker, Francis, (Barry Pepper) for a night of reconciliation, celebration. The girlfriend, Naturelle (Rosario Dawson), comes along, although she and Monty aren't speaking much, since Monty believes it was Naturelle who turned him into the DEA.
Did she? The movie argues for both possibilities and then reveals the answer.
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