Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 10 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

26 Letters and 99 Cents (Mulberry Books) Paperback – August 24, 1995


See all 10 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$6.99
$2.89 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

26 Letters and 99 Cents (Mulberry Books) + I Read Signs (Reading Rainbow Books)
Price for both: $13.62

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Kindle FreeTime Unlimited
Free one month trial
Get unlimited access to thousands of kid-safe books, apps and videos, for one low price, with Amazon FreeTime Unlimited. Get started for free. Learn more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 4 - 8 years
  • Grade Level: Preschool - 3
  • Series: Mulberry Books
  • Paperback: 40 pages
  • Publisher: Greenwillow Books; Reprint edition (August 24, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068814389X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0688143893
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 11.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (11 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #625,037 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Hoban's crisp photo-essay presents images of upper- and lower-case letters beside objects beginning with that letter; reverse the book, and numerals are shown alongside coins that total that amount. Ages 3-up.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

PreSchool-Grade 3 Hoban's clever design, providing two books in one, is highlighted with clear, bright photographs. In the alphabet half of the book, each upper- and lower-case ``soft touch'' letter in primary colors (two per page), is matched to a photo of an object. Interesting and challenging choices are presented to enhance vocabulary development of preschoolers. At ``Z,'' readers need to turn the book around for the counting half. Here ``soft touch'' numbers are used. The count proceeds in sequential order to 30, by 5's to 50, and by 10's to 90. An exciting feature of 99 Cents is the concept of monetary equivalency grouping which is introduced at number 5 and continues with increasing complexity. Teachers and parents can extend counting and grouping activities by creating additional coin combinations. Children will enjoy manipulating money, numbers, and letters to correspond to the photographs in this book. The combination of unique design, distinguished photographs, and superb layout adds up to a winner! Gale W. Sherman, Pocatello Pub . Lib . , Idaho
Copyright 1987 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Tana Hoban's photographs have been exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art in New York and in galleries around the world. She has won many gold medals and prizes for her work as a photographer and filmmaker. Her books for children are known and loved throughout the world.

Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 26, 2000
Format: Library Binding
This is a good book for beginning readers. It links the letters of the alphabet with colorful and engaging photographs. It also shows the connection between counting and the way that our coin system works (nickels, dimes etc.) The only difficulty for young readers would be when they get half way through the book and find that the rest of the book is upside down. This might be confusing for a young reader trying to read the book by themselves. This is a book that is best shared by a young reader and a more experienced reader.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Bell VINE VOICE on August 11, 2003
Format: Paperback
There is no better way to teach children than with concepts they can grasp. Hoban's photographs allow the concreteness of money and letters to be real and not just a picture on a page in a book.
I have my classroom stocked with multiple copies of this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Ross on September 21, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book has excellent examples of both upper and lower case letters in bright, fun colors that really got my three year old interested in learning them. The use of coins to teach counting is great and as the photos are actual size, I'm certain in the future I will be using real coins as a companion to the book. This is a really attractive book that would make a great gift.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 2001
Format: Paperback
Tana Hoban is an author of many children's books. She has used photography as her way of illustrating her books. One half of this book is the teaching of the alphabet in very colorful pages and the other half of the book (which you need to turn over and upside down) is the teaching of coins and money. It is very colorful and eyecatching. The book is definitely a great teaching tool.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
This book is described as being for a baby or a preschooler. I agree, because by kindergarten, one is supposed to have learned all the letters and numbers.
Not a story, but for the age this book is aimed at, it makes sense.
For myself, I didn't care too much for some of the details. First of all, the information about the soft touch letters and numbers in the book is outdated-they are no longer manufactured as far as I know and the manufacturer's address does not work anymore(I tried contacting them and the letter came back). And second of all, for the alphabet side of the book, there is a letter and a picture of something beginning with that letter, but the word is absent. How will somebody at the target age be able to know that word without seeing it?
At least on the counting side, they show how much each coin is worth so the target age knows how to count by 5s, 10s, and what not. (They can see that 5 cents makes a nickel and what not.)
It was clever to make a book where the reader must flip over to see the other side. The endpapers tell the reader which side he or she is on.
Three stars. Beautiful photographs. The book has its ups and downs, but since some youngsters may want to own the soft touch letters and numbers in the book, I wouldn't buy it because there are other books that teach the alphabet and numbers that don't have outdated information about the toys used in the book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Audiophile on February 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
I purchased this book for my 15 month old as a 'down the road' book because it was recommended in the book 'Toddler 411'. Surprisingly, this book is a current favorite and she is actually saying 'a', 'b', '2' etc. Does she get the concept? I don't think so, but she's connecting the way a letter or number looks to its name (much like she does with other objects). The graphics are clear. My only small criticism is that the representation of 'v' is a heart with the word 'valentine' written on it. She is getting to know the shape off a heart so I think that might be confusing. Otherwise, I highly recommend this one!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?