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30 Arduino Projects for the Evil Genius Paperback – July 28, 2010

ISBN-13: 978-0071741330 ISBN-10: 007174133X Edition: 1st

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Product Details

  • Series: Evil Genius
  • Paperback: 208 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill/TAB Electronics; 1 edition (July 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 007174133X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071741330
  • Product Dimensions: 8.6 x 0.5 x 10.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (56 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #475,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Simon Monk, Ph.D., is the co-founder of the mobile software company Momote Ltd. He has been an active electronics hobbyist since his early teens and is an occasional author in hobby electronics magazines. Simon was the co-author of the textbook Databases in Theory and Practice.


More About the Author

Simon is a full-time author.

His books are on topics related to Open Hardware and Electronics.

You can find out more about him here: http://www.simonmonk.org

Customer Reviews

This book is helping me, and I'm sure it will help you too.
J. Burnett
In the few projects I have tried, the schematic diagram, breadboard layout, and photograph of complete breadboard do not match.
Not so evil simpleton
I would recommend this book to anyone that wants to learn the Arduino or has plans to use it for a project.
rik

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

198 of 215 people found the following review helpful By Not so evil simpleton on November 4, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I do not consider myself evil, nor do I consider myself a genius, maybe that is why I'm having so many issues with this book. This book contains great project ideas. That is why I bought it. However, as I am new to electronics and the arduino platform, some of the mistakes in the book can cause great frustration. In the few projects I have tried, the schematic diagram, breadboard layout, and photograph of complete breadboard do not match. The first example is Project 4. The program from project 3 says use digital pin 12. The schematic diagram Fig. 3-5 says digital pin 11, and the breadboard layout fig 3-6 and photograph of complete breadboard fig 3-8 shows it connected to digital pin 12. This one is easy to figure out, however, breadboard layout fig 3-6 also shows Luxeon LED connecting to the wrong pin on the T1-BD139. It is hard to see, but it is showing it connected to the same pin as the 270 Ohm resistor. You need to look at the photograph of the complete breadboard fig 3-8 to see the correct way to wire the circuit. This is also incorrect on Fig 4-6 Breadboard layout for project 6.

Second example: the Components and equipment for project 7: Shows "R4-5 4 Ohm 2W resistor" This doesn't match the Schematic Fig 4-9, where you need two 4 Ohm 1 Watt (not 2 Watt) resistors.

I then jumped ahead to Project 28, which I'm still trying to figure out how to configure correctly. The Schematic diagram Fig. 9-8 has the IC1 component connected to Digital pin 9. The Breadboard layout has it connected to digital pin 3. The photograph fig 9-7 has it connected to digital pin 9. The text says it is connected to digital pin 9, so I assume three to one this is correct. The 100 Ohm resistor in the picture fig 9-7 is connected to ground.
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36 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Stephen Hall on August 16, 2010
Format: Paperback
I had never even heard of Arduino boards but was lead here by the "Evil Genius" bit of the title whilst looking to improve my electronics knowledge. I have now bought the Arduino kit (clone because it is cheaper) and have had a go at a couple of the simpler projects which worked well. I was initially worried about the programming side given that it is C, but the Ardunio environment and clear explanation (and code listing) for each project made it a breeze. When I get time I will try more ambitious projects (particularly looking forward to the servo controlled lazer). Highly recommended.

Stephen
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17 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Bruce Miller on November 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is the clearest introduction to the Arduino microcontroller development system I have read. I'm a tinkerer and every page in this book made me want to buy it and write notes and ideas in it.

I jot brainstorms and questions in the margins - create links to other pages - correct a few minor errors and ambiguities ("darn it, is it pin 11 or pin 12?"). I write in updates and corrections from the ArduinoEvilGenius-com website. My copy is a dog's breakfast of pencil smudges, beverage stains and sticky notes.

30 Arduino Projects catches the spirit of the mildly mischievous Evil Genius Series. It is light-hearted, conversational, and fun-loving. Beautifully and clearly written; with tremendous respect for readers and what they really need to know.

Before finding this book, I was frustrated by Arduino books which were too fluffy, pompous, or just too complicated. This book hits the sweet spot for me.

North American readers may be confused by what seems to be a RadioShack parts list in the back of the book. Even the part numbers look like RadioShack numbers. But in fact, "RS" stands for the UK RadioSpares company. It is still worth checking the RadioSpares-com website for useful information. Luckily, the author gives a general list of other suppliers and sources.

Some of the photos are too murky to give more than a general idea of the actual layout of the schematic. Fortunately there is usually a line-drawing as well.

All of the programming is available as a quick, one-time, free download from the author's web site. I've never used "C" before and my high-school BASIC is rusty. But this friendly author explains and clarifies as you go along.
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38 of 43 people found the following review helpful By John Heath on October 1, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Simon Monk provides Arduino newbies a guide that goes way beyond "Getting Started With Arduino", yet deals with the subject in an easy to read, accessible format. His projects are also far more practical eg he deals with flashing a simple led (like every other Arduino text) but then scales this up to high power Luxeon leds in various different applications but based on similar circuitry. This lead me to adapting one of his circuits to a real-world interest of mine, involving led lamps.

I look forward to a sequel where he might take us into the (so far) murky world of timers and interrupts, an area not covered very well (yet) in the Arduino world.
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dane Sonewald on December 18, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
One of the best I have read of the Evil Genius series. No previous Arduino or programming experience is required. All the Arduino code can be downloaded, and is of good quality and modular, can easily be reused in your own projects. You don't need to know any programming but a class in Java or C certainly wouldn't hurt if you want to understand everything going on. One of the things I liked immediately about this book is that it goes into detail about why and how you choose a certain electronic component and calculate its value. A simplified non-standard circuit schematic notation is used that makes it easy to wire the circuits. The projects are breadboarded but one of the projects is how to make "shields", soldered add-on boards from any of the projects that can be plugged in as a module above the main Arduino board. The author seems to have struck an excellent balance between cool projects and inexpensive components. So you won't find projects that use $30-60 ultrasonic sensors or 6-DOF accelerometers. But it does have a project that communicates with an LCD module. All the basics are here in this book that will prepare for more complex projects in robotics, art, and musical instruments.
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