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300 Best Rice Cooker Recipes: Also Including Legumes and Whole Grains Paperback


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300 Best Rice Cooker Recipes: Also Including Legumes and Whole Grains + Japanese Rice Washing Bowl with Side and Bottom Drainers + Aroma ARC-914SBD 4-Cup (Uncooked) 8-Cup (Cooked) Digital Rice Cooker and Food Steamer
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: Robert Rose (July 28, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0778802809
  • ISBN-13: 978-0778802808
  • Product Dimensions: 10 x 7.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #44,384 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

The electric rice cooker has proven a popular kitchen appliance among consumers of rice as a daily diet staple. The machine’s set-it-and-forget-it ease of operation and the superior, succulent cooked grain it produces make it a worthwhile investment. As Chin points out, the rice cooker conveniently yields perfect grains beyond simply rice. Wheat, barley, rye, quinoa, oats, millet, and more come out toothsome and never scorched. Beans, peanuts, and lentils also profit from the rice cooker’s controlled heat. Recipes encompass all these grains as well as more complex soups, stews, and chili that use the appliance to ease both cooking and cleanup. Chin inventories and explains the array of rice cookers currently available, from the least expensive to computer-controlled induction models that employ fuzzy logic to make every grain a model of perfection. She also describes turning the cooker into a steamer to produce steamed Chinese dumplings. --Mark Knoblauch

Review

The rice cooker conveniently yields perfect grains beyond simply rice. Wheat, barley, rye, quinoa, oats, millet, and more come out toothsome and never scorched. Beans, peanuts, and lentils also profit from the rice cooker's controlled heat. Recipes encompass all these grains as well as more complex soups, stews, and chili that use the appliance to ease both cooking and cleanup. Chin inventories and explains the array of rice cookers currently available. (Mark Knoblauch Booklist 2011-12-15)

More About the Author


Chef Katie Chin was born and raised in Minneapolis by her award winning restaurateur mother, Leeann Chin. As a schoolgirl, Katie assisted in her mother's catering jobs and, later, worked in the restaurants. She used her mother's first cookbook to give dinner parties in her dorm room in college. But as a time-pressed adult, Katie adopted the contemporary cuisine of her peers--restaurant food, takeout and Haagen Dazs. Until her mother intervened: "If you go to a restaurant and sit down, it's two hours!" Leeann told her daughter. "In that time you could make something healthy!" Feeling inspired and back in touch with her culinary roots, Katie quit her job as a film and television marketing executive to run her catering company, Double Happiness Catering. Specializing in Pan-Asian cuisine, Katie catered many celebrity-studded events for the high fashion and entertainment industries.
Katie is author of "300 Best Rice Cooker Recipes" (Robert Rose Publishing) and co-author of "Everyday Chinese Cooking" (Clarkson Potter). She also co-hosted the 2003 national PBS cooking series, "Double Happiness," in conjunction with her mother, Leeann. Katie has made numerous appearances on national television including demos on The Today Show, The Daily Buzz as well as Specials for The Food Network and Fine Living. She has been featured in Glamour, Family Circle, Cooking Light, Bon Appetit, Self Magazine, Angeleno Magazine, Hampton Magazine, Elle Magazine, Daily Candy, Daily Variety, Real Simple, The Los Angeles Times and Ventura Blvd Magazine. Katie recently served as a guest judge on Food Network's Iron Chef America and as a featured guest on Cooking Channel's Food(ography) and Good Day New York. She currently serves as the Culinary Ambassador to City of Hope and its Super Foods initiative.
Based in Los Angeles, Katie divides her time posting recipes to her blog, www.thesweetandsourchronicles.com, working on her next cookbook, throwing karaoke dinner parties and caring for her toddler twins. Katie shares a passion for Asian cuisine, style and culture and is committed to teaching the American public that the very best Asian cooking can be achieved in a real home kitchen, by real people, on real schedules.

Customer Reviews

The recipes are easy to follow and they taste great.
marathonman
I am so inspired by this book, it has given me new confidence in the kitchen and who knows, I may just go through all 300 recipes.
Rita M Prosyak
I've made most of the recipes and to my own amazement I really look forward to cooking when I get home from work.
R.K. Smith

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

83 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Barbara Joyce on February 1, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just bought my first-ever rice cooker (a very nice Zojirushi model). Since some of the reviews of this cookbook have been negative and completely without reasonable basis (giving it one star because so many others gave it five stars--what is the logic to that?!?!), I decided to wait to review it until I had time to study the informative portions of the book and could try a few recipes.

My first three efforts included a risotto, a pilaf and a polenta. First, Lemony Risotto with Shrimp, pictured on the front of the book. I figured if it made the cover, it had to be good, and it was! Just the right hint of lemon along with a delicious, creamy risotto and perfectly cooked shrimp, all without the constant stirring usually required when making risotto. Next was Orange Pistachio Pilaf, made with plain old white rice. An easy and delicious side dish! Last was Polenta Primavera, a little more work, but a wonderful vegetarian entrée.

Pros: The beginning pages of this book are worth the price alone. The author starts with a discussion of rice cookers in general. There follow pages of descriptions of various rices (I had no idea there were so many different kinds of rice!), grains, and legumes that can be cooked in your rice cooker. Along the way, she educates about the proper way to prepare these foods. For example, she states that all rices should be rinsed before cooking, except Arborio and Carnaroli, and she explains why.

The index is very detailed and accurate. There are 2 small sections with color photographs tucked inside the book. There are recipes for breakfasts, desserts, and everything in between. Some of the recipes require a large-capacity rice cooker, and some require a unit that features fuzzy-logic.
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51 of 52 people found the following review helpful By Gillby on December 5, 2012
Format: Paperback
I recently got on the rice cooker bandwagon having bought an expensive fuzzy-logic machine, so I'm well aware of the wide variety of foods that a rice cooker can make, especially the fuzzy-logic kind. So I was expecting a book purporting to have 300 recipes for rice cookers to expand my horizons on what I can do with my machine. I was impressed by the variety and different flavors of cuisine represented in the book (Japanese, Thai, Italian, Indian, Southern American, Mexican, etc.) and by the styles of dishes (the book is sectioned into: breakfasts; appetizers, snacks, and sushi; salads; soups; stews and chilis; main dishes and one-pot meals; risottos and pilafs; side dishes; steam cuisine; desserts). As one would expect, there are a plethora of very interesting and creativity-inspiring dishes involving various rice and grains and rice cookers which made the book worth a buy for me.

However, I am perplexed at what some of the recipes have to do with rice cookers, especially since in the "How to Use This Book" section the author says "All of the recipes in this book can be made using an electronic rice cooker." Well, that's stretching the truth to say the least. Many recipes just take something that you are to previously have made presumably in the rice cooker, like cooked rice or chickpeas or lentils, and then are just a regular non-rice cooker recipe sometimes requiring various other equipment like skillets, food processors, ovens, broiling pan, etc. For example, recipes like quiche, pancakes, pate, bean dip, garlic steak...none of which have anything to do with a ricecooker.
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20 of 20 people found the following review helpful By magicgirl on June 4, 2013
Format: Paperback
Just want to warn those who have a small rice cooker, don't get excited.
This book is for medium rice cookers 14-16 cups, or large 19-22 cups.
And if its an on/off cheap model there aren't that many recipes for it either.

This book is a little deceiving....
The recipes don't always use the rice cooker exclusively.
It makes you cook a meal on the stovetop separately and then you add the rice from the rice cooker.
To me, that doesn't sound like a rice cooker recipe book.
I was expecting recipes that you could do by putting everything in the rice cooker.

The recipes look good, but I wish it would use the rice cooker as the main method of cooking.
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28 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Adam Drucker on October 4, 2011
Format: Paperback
This book is great for everyone, not just a working parent. It's the same problem that we all experience - you work a full day and have no energy to prepare a meal for you or your family. You want to order in but you think twice because of the expense and you want to eat something on the healthier side. This book accomplishes it all! Meals can be made relatively quickly, you can see each ingrediant going into your dish, and the cleanup isn't miserable because you really only use 1 item to cook. I found this cookbook to be exactly what my wife and I needed. Plus, this isn't rice cooker specific or even specific to rice itself. The author seems to have really done her homework. Thanks Chef Chin!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Flying Piggy on May 23, 2013
Format: Paperback
Luckily for me I borrowed this book from the library before actually purchasing it otherwise I would have definately returned it.
I was looking for recipes where I could just throw everything in the rice cooker and come back 1 hour later and have dinner ready instead I was presented with recipes that required cooking ingredients in a separate skillet or in the oven and then add the pre cooked rice later.
Overall the recipes are not bad but they're nothing new and a lot of them can be found online or on other recipes book.
Sadly I cannot recommend it.
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