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35 Up [VHS]

8 customer reviews

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Product Details

  • Actors: Bruce Balden, Jacqueline Bassett, Symon Basterfield, Andrew Brackfield, John Brisby
  • Format: Color, NTSC
  • Language: Bulgarian, English
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Number of tapes: 1
  • Studio: Fox Lorber
  • VHS Release Date: November 11, 1997
  • Run Time: 123 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: 6304390254
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #446,389 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

35 Up continues what surely must be the longest-running sociological documentary in history. It's also extraordinary and engrossing filmmaking on the part of its creator, Michael Apted. In 1963, Apted served as assistant director on the first installment of the British television-funded project, Seven Up, which asked a cross-section of English schoolkids about their outlook on life, and dreams and hopes for the future. Apted vowed afterward that he'd visit the same individuals every seven years and continue the project. Up to this point, only three have found the self-assessment project too painful or tedious to continue (though, numerous subjects voice their displeasure during this film, raising complex moral questions about its voyeuristic drive). The first four installments were compiled into a theatrical release, 28 Up, so that the jarring twists and turns experienced by all of the characters appeared more obvious and made for compelling viewing. Since, now, only seven years have passed, life's changes here are far subtler. What eventually emerges is an overwhelming recognition that youth is dimming, replaced, in the majority of cases, by routine. 35 Up is a much more somber and, at times, more melancholy study. Many speak, disillusioned, about regret and lost dreams, while a few seem content at best, thankful that they achieved some of their original goals. Family problems, like coping with the deaths of parents or raising children, now replace questions and concerns about career direction that dominated much of the earlier entries. Apted plans to continue his poignant work about the passage of time around the millennium. --Dave McCoy

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Cliff R. Carpenter on December 7, 1999
Format: VHS Tape
A fascinating insight into the real lives of several ordinairy British people over a span of 28 years - from age 7 to age 35. This documentary attempts to prove the premise that you can "show me the boy at seven - and I will show you the man". A classic, insightful look at the impact of Britain's social and educational systems on the lives of ordinairy British people.
As one who was born and raised in England for 27 years, I saw the characters as startingly close to many of my own childhood and young adult experiences. One of the characters is so painfully close to some of my own early experiences, this documentary drew me into a serious state of introspection. It served as a powerful reminder to me of why I so love England - and why I'm so glad I no longer live there.
A powerful documentary, it reveals both the incredible simplicity and complexity of ordinairy people. Despite its focus on British people and their society, this documentary will have universal appeal - certainly many of my American friends seem to have found it equally engrossing.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Robert H. Nunnally Jr. on June 13, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
The premise is simple, and has a sort of 60s naivete about it. Choose a group of British schoolkids from various socio-economic backgrounds, and follow them every seven years. The fifth installment, 35 Up, catches the group as they enter mid-life. The interspersing of the interviews from the earlier ages of the kids' lives (also documented in 7 Up, etc.) is extremely effective. These are genuinely interesting people, and if they do not quite serve as "emblems" of the class-based culture of the UK that might have been originally envisioned, nonetheless Apted is able to drive home a number of interesting points about the effect of background upon one's life. This is a fascinating, sometimes heartwarming, sometimes heartbreaking set of vignettes from the life of a gaggle of people. It's altogether a welcome relief from the MTV "Real Life" or "Survivor" brand of "real life" film-making. The film series has moved on to "42 Up", but 35 Up is a must see nonetheless.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By David J. Loftus on April 14, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
This is the second episode available on video (though actually the fifth in the entire series -- see my review and the other info on "28 Up") of Michael Apted's incredible experiment: to follow a handful of English individuals through life by taking a "video snapshot" of them every 7 years.
Some have divorced. Some have still not married. Symon, who seemed so stable and good-natured in "28 Up," is nowhere to be seen, although he will turn up again in "42 Up." John, one of the upper-class toffs who came off so amusingly haughty at 7, comes back into the game and reveals a side we had not guessed before (although he speaks of the "bitter pellet of poison" the individuals in this series have to take every seven years).
Neil, the homeless (and obviously mentally unstable) man in "28 Up" who was so articulate about the stakes even though he couldn't seem to hold it together enough to sustain a job, apparently came across as some sort of "guru of free thought" and reports getting contacts from all sorts of people who wanted him to give them the answer. He performs in amateur theatricals and manages a semblance of stability while remaining on welfare.
Director Apted quietly poses questions from off-camera, sometimes pushes his "friend-subjects" a little, and they bravely continue to reveal themselves to us, to the world ... to the infinite future. One both envies them for having such a record in hand, and thanks one's stars that no one has turned such bright lights on our lives.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By M. Lynch on September 7, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
I first came on the series with "28 Up" which was truly amazing for an American to see. Interspersing clips from "7 Up," "14 Up," & "21 Up" made it incredible to see the changes. In particular, Suzi, a nervous chain-smoking wreck at 21 was a happy calm mother at 28. All, in fact (with one sad exception) seemed incredibly content with their lots--I was reminded of 1984 for some reason. "35 Up" doesn't have quite the contrasts with its predecessors. It's wonderful to see that, for the most part, all have progressed nicely in their lives. (And I've always wondered why no one snapped Bruce up!) One interesting omission from this one is Peter--he's nowhere to be seen (& disappointingly, Symon doesn't participate). The haunting figure, again, is Neil. He's a seriously troubled individual, trying hard to cope with mental illness in an unsympathetic world. The questions coming at him from off camera are almost cruel--& his facial reactions to them are heartbreaking. It's quite a contrast to the contentment of the others.
If you've never seen this series before, it's definitely worth watching!
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