A Simple Act of Gratitude and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Usually ships within 1 to 3 weeks.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
365 Thank Yous: The Year ... has been added to your Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life Hardcover – Deckle Edge, December 28, 2010


See all 9 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover, Deckle Edge
"Please retry"
$23.00
$7.40 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

365 Thank Yous: The Year a Simple Act of Daily Gratitude Changed My Life + 101 Ways to Say Thank You: Notes of Gratitude for All Occasions + The Thank You Book: Hundreds of Clever, Meaningful, and Purposeful Ways to Say Thank You
Price for all three: $42.08

Some of these items ship sooner than the others.

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Hyperion; Later Printing edition (December 28, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401324053
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401324056
  • Product Dimensions: 7.5 x 5.4 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (233 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #34,586 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

John Kralik was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and attended the University of Michigan for college and law school. He practiced law for 30 years, and was a partner in the law firms of Hughes Hubbard & Reed, Miller Tokuyama Kralik & Sur and Kralik & Jacobs. In 2009, he was appointed to be a judge of the Los Angeles Superior Court. He lives in the Los Angeles area.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Related Media


Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
5 star
164
4 star
55
3 star
12
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 233 customer reviews
This book is changing my life for the better and I am learning a lot.
Takeitlightly
I love stories like Pay It Forward, where a kindness changes someone.... makes us look at the good and not focus so much on all that is and can be bad around us.
Sheila A. Dechantal
I am now sending thank you notes for at least this month, and I gave my copy of the book to a friend shortly after reading it.
Anne from Detroit

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

133 of 134 people found the following review helpful By N. B. Kennedy TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 24, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a charming book and a perfect read for the week of Thanksgiving. In his mid-50s, John Kralik is feeling low. His legal firm is failing, he's broke, twice divorced, living in a grungy apartment, estranged from his sons, overweight, plagued by annoying health problems, and his girlfriend has dumped him.

But one day he receives a thank-you note. It's an epiphany for Mr. Kralik. He realizes how few times in his life he's ever thanked anyone and how little a role gratitude has played in his life. Armed with that knowledge, and a huge stack of stationery, he begins to write thank-you notes. He writes personal messages of gratitude to almost anyone you could imagine: from his sons, colleagues and old friends, to his ex-wife, the building superintendent and the guy who serves him at Starbucks.

Mr. Kralik finds that the act of expressing thanks changes not only him, but his circumstances as well. He doesn't exactly call it karma, but the goodwill he engenders seems to reverse the trajectory of his life. He even finds himself literally at the door of a church (after a bad fall while running) and he decides to go in, regularly. I suspect that had something to do with his turnaround as well.

I guess once Scott Turow picked up a pen, we all realized attorneys can write more than legal briefs. Mr. Kralik writes lovely sentences and abounds in the small observations that make a story ring true. He explores how the act of writing thank-yous is to him what meditation or yoga might be to another person. His relationships blossom and he delights in the company of others, especially his young daughter.

In the end, Mr.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
71 of 71 people found the following review helpful By Jill Florio TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on December 14, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I enjoyed the premise of this memoir - that no matter how down and out your circumstances, you can still find ways to be grateful. When John Kralik decides to look for the good, he resolves to pen a thank you note each day to someone who has touched him.

I chuckled at the 'extreme thank yous' where John reaches out to thank Starbucks employees, hairdressers and doormen. After all, 365 is a lot of notes to write, and once you get past thanking people for the obvious big things, then even the little moments become thank you fodder. And not surprisingly, the people who received these notes were very moved by them. It just takes one person to notice a kindness and make someone's day special.

Shortly after the author started sending his notes, good things started to ripple into his life. This is like another version of The Secret (which Kralik does reference), whereby what you focus on, you draw to you. Not every problem in his life fades away; this isn't a fairy tale. But enough positive events occur to make one want to emulate the author.

I appreciated that John was able to take the pressure off himself to do a note a day, and simply plods on to reach his 365 note mark. He realized the importance was in the writing itself, and not in an arbitrary timeline.

Unfortunately the story ends - as too many memoirs do - abruptly. John's story just stops in the middle of his narrative. I gather ending a memoir is probably the hardest part of writing your own story...after all, there is still life to be lived. But still, a lackluster resolution leaves a funny taste in the reader's mouth.

Despite the subdued, sudden ending, I was inspired to start my own "year" of writing thank you notes. I bought a calendar to mark each day and to whom I thanked. I realize it will be a hard task, but I think it is a worthwhile one (I am up to 33 thank yous!).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
56 of 58 people found the following review helpful By Miss Darcy VINE VOICE on November 26, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This is a fantastic book and perfect to inspire some New Year's resolutions. The premise is simple: the author, down on his luck despite the outward appearance of success (i.e., he heads his own law firm), decides to spend the new year writing one sincere thank you note a day.

Some days it's harder to be grateful than others, and he ends up thanking the young man who remembers his name at Starbucks, the doctor who told him to stop drinking, his sons (for a gift and for repaying a loan), his employees (who begin to send each other thank-you notes), and so forth. And while this occurs, even through the tough days (which don't evaporate, of course), he finds that his outlook completely changes. His relationships with others deepen. Old wounds begin to heal. He finds that he does have much to offer the world. He realizes that things he's been stewing over as misfortunes really were blessings in disguise.

Here's an example. Ten years earlier, he went through corrective surgery that left him feeling traumatized. Yet as he focuses on gratitude, he is suddenly able to view the experience in a whole new way: "Here was yet another example of how I always viewed my life's troubles as a series of tragedies, which I survived only due to my Job-like patience and my Jesus-like goodness. I should have been waking up every day of the past ten years with gratitude" (because the pain that kept him up nights is gone). He sends the surgeon a thank-you note and (as often happens) receives a grateful reply for the acknoweldegment.

The book contains just a few of the actual notes, interwoven with the author's narration. The balance is just right.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews