4:13 Dream

October 28, 2008 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
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6:17
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3:55
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4:35
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2:28
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2:22
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4:42
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4:29
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3:42
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3:21
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4:06
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3:51
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4:35
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4:17
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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: October 28, 2008
  • Release Date: October 28, 2008
  • Label: Geffen
  • Copyright: (C) 2008 Geffen Records
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 52:40
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001IXUM1A
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (104 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #64,972 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

There are a few good songs on it, but nothing like their classic albums.
Michael Douglas Neely
The bass and vocals are almost always mixed way too high, the drums sound thin and quiet, and the guitars are mixed so low they are sometimes hard to heard.
Rebecca Farber
"The Perfect Boy" my favorite is the defining song on this album, any CURE fan [probably already has this]will surely enjoy!!!!!
WAZDAT'S

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

59 of 67 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca Farber on November 13, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Full disclosure: I LOVE the Cure. They are my favorite band. However, I do not think they have released a first class record since Bloodflowers. I found the self titled album terribly disappointing, and this album, though better than the last, still leaves much to be desired. I fear Robert Smith is trying to remain young and relevant by embracing the modern emo/hardcore aesthetic, rather than the aesthetic that made them amazing in the first place. This was especially apparent with their choice of producer on the self titled album (Produced by Ross Robinson, who had previously worked with bands like Limp Bizkit), and with the emo bands bands they chose to remix their material on their latest EP, Hypnagogic States.

While I think the writing on this album has improved dramatically, I think the production is HORRIBLE, and that damn near ruins the album for me. The bass and vocals are almost always mixed way too high, the drums sound thin and quiet, and the guitars are mixed so low they are sometimes hard to heard. This is a special shame, since it sounds like the shimmery guitars may be back on this record, but are often buried far too low. Working with another producer that is more familiar with and better able to handle the sound that the Cure are so good at (I would LOVE LOVE LOVE to see Alan Moulder get his hands on a Cure record), I truely think this could have been a return to form and another amazing record. The Cure need to embrace their role of elder statesmen of a genre and STOP trying to be a modern emo band. They are wonderful at making huge sounding, dense, dreamy music, and I would love to see them do that once again.
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70 of 88 people found the following review helpful By Andrew Vice on October 28, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Picture this: Disintegration is the beautiful model you see in a glossy magazine picture, glacially gorgeous, but in some ways unapproachable. Wish is the pretty girl you see at a party, and while she may not be Disintegration-beautiful, she's a hell of a lot more fun, and a lot easier to get into. Wild Mood Swings is the plain girl with a crush on the guy that will never have any interest in her, and that only makes her try harder and harder to please him, never able to really give him what he wants or make him into her. Bloodflowers is a dark, mysterious beauty, and when she isn't busy cutting herself, she's illustrating to you that she does in fact understand something about life, love, and pain, and you just have to stick with her long enough to get her message. The Cure is just an angsty emo girl sitting in her room decrying the state of the world with embarrassingly childish notebook poetry, listening to the bands that her daddy served as the greatest influence for. And now, we have 4:13 Dream, who just so happens to be the fun, cool, pretty girl that every guy wants to be around and every girl wants to be. Suffice to say, 4:13 Dream is probably the best album the Cure have released since Wish, depending on your personal preference for Bloodflowers.

4:13 Dream opens with what is easily the best song Robert Smith has written since Disintegration, Underneath The Stars. This is a dark, swirling, brutal kind of song, washing over the listener in layers of reverb guitar and plaintive echoed cries. Smith's singing and lyrics on this track are top notch, standing as the best track on the album, and one of the best Cure openers ever. The album moves on to the fun pop of The Only One, which I reviewed at length on its release.
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27 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Angry Mofo on November 3, 2008
Format: Audio CD
If you hated The Cure's 2004 self-titled album, you might like 4:13 Dream more. But I liked the last album, although the grungy sound would have been more timely in 1992. Despite its flaws, I think I listen to it more often than to Wish. I'm less enthusiastic about this album, however.

What's especially noticeable, to me, is the crudeness of the vocals. It's not necessarily that Smith's voice has gotten worse, but it seems that there is much less variety in his performances. He doesn't emote much anymore. In most of these songs, he sort of half-yells, half-recites the lines, and it sounds like he's having a harder time fitting them into the music, like his voice is straining to keep up with the rhythm. For instance, the music in "The Only One" is almost exactly the same as in "High" from Wish (the intro induces serious deja vu), but Smith's vocal is much tighter and catchier on the 1992 album. And since his voice is loud in the mix here (like on the 2004 album), every flaw is made especially apparent. This "loose" feeling doesn't serve The Cure well -- somehow I suspect that this exact same song, with the same words and music, would have sounded a lot better if Smith had sung it ten years ago, with the more disciplined approach he had then.

At the same time, "less catchy" is still pretty catchy, in this case. Even if you only listen to the first thirty seconds of "The Only One," you might not be able to get it out of your head. In fact, you might have a better impression of the song if you only listen to the first thirty seconds.
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