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4 For Texas
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on March 31, 2000
Who cares if this movie is going nowhere like some complain. Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra give a lot of laughs and Ursalla Andress and Anita Ekberg are perfect partners for them. The rest of the cast make the movie something different that usual western spoofs. You get two semi-good guys, two bad baddies, and an assortment of others plus a cameo by the Three Stooges. What more can you want. The good guys win in the end, the gals get the guys, and everyone lives happily ever after. It's great. No social message or deep plot, just pure enjoyment for some of us lighter hearted movie buffs.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 30, 2003
Well Sinatra and Martin are classy and funny, the ladies are sexy, the supporting cast generates laughs and we even get the three stooges for good measure doing their classic <clap clap clap> TEXAS skit.
this is no movie classic but it is a fun picture that doesn't take itself too seriously. In that vein you will enjoy it.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2006
Frank Sinatra (1915-1998) and Dean Martin (1917-1995) play wily Business rivals in this wild West lark og gambling and romance . It?s 4 for Texas as the two sars joined by Busty Swedish Anita Ekberg (1931- ) (measurements: 40-22-36 in 1950) and Ursula Andress (1936- ) , vie for oneupmanship at the card tables of 1870s Galverston .The cards hold a lot more fun when the film?s many talented co-stars join in . The three stonges turn up in a trademark slapstick sketch . Preening Victor Buono (1938-1982) is the most deviius , double-crossing villain this side Snidely Whiplash . And Charles Bronson (1921-2003) is rattlesnake-mean gunslinger with a nasty habit of absorbing more lead than he dishes out . At center stagecoach shootout to final riverboat melee , pals Sinatra and Martin clearly have a blast , So will you . High Quality digital transfer .
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on July 25, 2001
Three stars, for Four for Texas. Bet your wondering, What the heck is this movie? Well its one of those films with big stars in an average film, with colorful characters. Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra go head to head as enemies wanting the same thing: a hundred thousand dollars. Not much happens really, mostly just butting heads. But as enemies they do each other justice, by simply being on the screen for two hours. Even though there is little gun-play, the best thing about Four for Texas is the humor. Mostly dry stuff that just seems to work. I particularly liked the bumbling emecile banker that always seems to be both looking for a sandwich, and a quick fix for his "intestinal fortitude" problem. ~S.A.O.S.~
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 1999
Aldrich produced a classic western spoof. Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin were great in their respective roles. If only movies like this could be made today! The scenary,costumes and characters are extremely well done.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon October 19, 2010
This late-ish Rat Pack entry (starring Ol' Blue Eyes and Dino) hardly qualifies as a "western", but the first scene IS a very traditional stagecoach chase/robbery sequence; if you're watching it for the western angle, well, that's going to be about all you're going to get. I'm a huge western fan, and not of just the traditional examples - comedy/parody and modern westerns are cool too - and I love Sinatra and Martin, and Charles Bronson. And the movie's got some eye candy in the form of it's two blonde costars also. Plenty of reasons to see it, right? Should I have been wary of the generally mediocre reviews? Was this going to turn out to be a disaster?

Well, not quite. But it IS rather dull and shapeless, and the comedy attempted by the stars, the contrast between Frank's energy and Dean's easygoing (almost lethargic) manner just doesn't cut it like it did in earlier efforts. Here Frankie and Dino are, respectively, Zack Thomas, an investor from Galveston Texas, and Joe Jarrett, a ne'er do well gambler from who knows where. Both are pretty handy with firearms, and manage to hold off a group of bandits led by Matson (Charles Bronson) who nonetheless manage to kill the stagecoach driver and the other passenger. There's a somewhat amusing tug-of-war (mostly verbal rather than physical) between Zack and Joe over the $100,000 in the coach, and eventually Joe ends up with it and he heads to Galveston to open up the riverboat casino that Zack was originally going to open himself. Complicating matters are a "business associate" of Zack's, crooked banker Harvey Burden (Victor Buono), the vengeful Matson, and two inexplicably European ladies, Elya (Anita Ekberg) and Maxine (Ursula Andress) who latch onto our two rivals.

Most of the film consists of scenes of the various characters setting up plans to trap or kill or otherwise get rid of each other, and most of them are pretty uninteresting; cross/double-cross stories have to have at least a little bit of drama or suspense, and this has none. I was hoping within the first 20 minutes that we'd get some songs, but alas that wasn't to be the case, and the film drags on for nearly 2 hours of uninteresting and very obvious conniving. C'mon, we know that Frank and Dino will be buddies at the end, bad guy Bronson will get his, and sweaty banker Buono will get hauled off to the pen, the true villain of the piece. And the girls will get the guys as reluctant but happy husbands, and we'll have lots of lame humor (including a way-too-extended cameo by the Three Stooges). There are a few ok action sequences besides the opening number, but they're not enough to salvage this from being mostly a turkey. Director Robert Aldrich must be one of the most erratic out of the list of filmmakers that routinely get called "great", with several real classics like KISS ME DEADLY and ATTACK - but also plenty of self-indulgent misfires like this one.

If you're a Rat Pack completist, of course you've got to see this, and it's not entirely worthless - hey, I'm giving it two stars, not one - Dean is kind of amusing at times, and Ursula Andress has rarely looked better. But in the final analysis, take it from this fan: like me, I suspect you'll be rewatching OCEANS 11 and even ROBIN AND THE SEVEN HOODS before you pop this one back in the DVD player a second time.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful
on September 23, 2006
I just watched this movie earlier today and I really loved it. I think this was a thousand times better than the last Sinatra film I saw-that crapola flick "The Manchurian Candidate." The scenes between him and Dean Martin are a riot. Speaking of that, there's a moment in the film's climax where The King of Cool and The Prince of Cool are fighting each other and I couldn't stop giggling. Boy I tell you, that fight scene was more enjoyable than Ol' Blue Eyes fighting Henry Silva in "The Manchurian Candidate" (talk about a mismatch in that one). Also, what can you say about Ursula Andress? How about one of the most sexy foreign actresses in cinema history? Also, Anita Ekberg co-stars (hard to believe this was the same woman who was in the fountain in "La Dolce Vita") as Sinatra's love interest and in a brillant move, Charles Bronson as the gunfighter who tries to nab Frank and Dean (this came in-between the westerns he was in like THE MAGNIFICENT SEVEN and ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST). As that weren't enough The Three Stooges and Arthur Godfrey have walk-on roles. The film was directed by Robert Aldrich; and it was the follow-up to what I think is his signature film-"Whatever Happened to Baby Jane?" As what the description to this DVD says at the end to best sum up this movie: 'You will have a blast.'
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on January 9, 2006
frank and dean together in the west with babes and bad guys and even a cameo by the three stooges. what more could you want. oh they also threw in a plot about them fighting over stolen money but really it's frank and dean that you come to see. if you don't like them then you will hate this movie. i loved it, you could tell they were having a ball and it makes the movie all the more fun. ring-a ding-ding baby the rat pack goes west.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon June 5, 2010
Opening with a slam-bang action sequence, "4 for Texas" (1963) begins promisingly as Dean Martin and Frank Sinatra enjoy a comic shoot-out in the Old West. Despite the best efforts of director Robert Aldrich and a colorful supporting cast, things go downhill pretty fast. With producer Sinatra calling the lackadaisical shots, the proceedings become relaxed to the point of boredom. Dino loved making Westerns, but Frank never looked convincing in the genre. Not surprisingly, Aldrich detested the final product and Sinatra's unprofessional behavior.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on November 3, 2008
Spaghetti western helmer Sergio Leone worshipped American director Robert Aldritch, even though Leone's experience as Aldritch's second-unit director on the Biblical epic "Sodom and Gomorrah (1962) proved short-lived. After he attained fame and fortune with his "Dollars" trilogy, Leone said that he owed it all to Aldritch. The Italian maestro rhapsodized especially over an earlier Aldritch oater "Vera Cruz" (1954) with Gary Cooper and Burt Lancaster. The best part of Aldritch's "Four For Texas" is the opening gambit. This exciting but abortive stagecoach robbery foreshadows everything that the Spaghetti western later espoused as its formula and ideology.

Matson (Charles Bronson of "The Dirty Dozen") and his gang are in hot pursuit after a stagecoach carrying $100-thousand dollars. Galveston entrepreneur Zack Thomas (Frank Sinatra of "Sergeants 3") lies sprawled atop the coach. He shoots at the bad guys with his Winchester repeating rifle, while Joe Jarrett (Dean Martin of "Rio Bravo") rides inside the vehicle. Joe pokes his head and gun arm out the window and racks up his share of kills. Our heroes dispatch at least six of Matson's gang before Matson calls a halt to the pursuit and withdraws to head back to town. One of Matson's cronies, Dobie (Jack Elam of "Once Upon A Time in the West), who appears in pre-Sergio Leone style close-up briefly, warns Matson that their boss, treacherous Harvey Burden (Victor Buono of "The Silencers"), won't be happy that they failed. Without blinking an eye, Matson guns down Dobie, blasting him out of the saddle with one lethal shot. Meanwhile, the stagecoach rider dies from a wound that he received from Matson's men and Zack has to stop a runaway stagecoach. He cannot and the vehicle rolls over with a crash. For the rest of the sequence, Zack and Joe engage in a contest of one-upmanship, the kind of games that Blonde and Tuco played in "The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly." First, Joe gets the drop on Zack who no longer has his rifle and takes the money. Second, Zack retrieves an entirely different Winchester rifle that he found cached with the money. He waits until Joe has ridden far enough away so that he can open up on him with his Winchester without fear of retaliatory gunfire. When this occurs, Joe realizes that he is at Zack's mercy. Joe's six-gun lacks the longer more accurate range of Zack's rifle. Zack forces Joe to fork over the fortune. Third, Joe surprises Zack when he palms a derringer concealed inside his Stetson and appropriates the money for the second time. In the first instance, Frank Sinatra behaves like a Spaghetti western anti-hero might as he ignites a cigar and patiently allows Dean Martin to out of range before he wields the Winchester. Sinatra even wears an outfit roughly similar to the togs that 'the Man With No Name' sported. This entire scene is better than anything else in this otherwise mediocre western. "Four for Texas" indulges in the two themes that characterized Italian westerns: (1) a cynical disregard for human life, and (2) an obsession with money that amounts to greed. The setting with its sharply-chiseled mountain peaks rearing up majestically in the background and arid desert stretching for miles in every direction replicates the typical south of the border scenery in spaghetti westerns. Indeed, for all practical purposes, the opening scene in "Four For Texas" qualifies as the only scene with action lensed on location beyond the confines of the studio.

Meanwhile, gluttonous Harvey Burden acts like Zack's friend. What Zack doesn't know is that the President of the Galveston Savings & Trust Bank has Matson and his gang of cutthroats secretly on his payroll. Victor Buono's first scene in Galveston is wonderful. He explains to "Walton's" star Ellen Corby, a widow with another elderly woman in a wheelchair with her, that if he loaned them the money that they requested that eventually he might have to foreclose on them and earn a bad reputation in the process. At about that time, Joe Jarrett shows up in town with the fortune in money sewn into his suit jacket and deposits it in Harvey's bank. Joe and Zack have the oddest friendship that evolves over time once they meet each other's girlfriends. Zack keeps fashion designer Elya Carlson (the voluptuous Swedish beauty Anita Ekberg of "La Dolce Vita") as his main squeeze. Joe hooks up with scantily clad Maxine Richter (Ursula Andress of "Dr. No") who owns a rundown riverboat that Joe helps her convert into a floating casino. Roughly speaking, the time that elapses between Joe's arrival in Galveston until the climactic scene on the docks when Zack and he join forces is equivalent to the time it takes to refurbish Maxine's riverboat.

"Four For Texas" conjures up few surprises to keep you guessing throughout its uneven 115 minutes. Zack and Joe play cat and mouse games, but you know that Frank and Dean couldn't remain at loggerheads for long. The chief bad guy here is Charles Bronson and it takes both of them to whip him. Bronson's death scene on the paddle wheel of the riverboat looks cool. The relationship between Victor Buono and Charles Bronson conceals the only surprise. An unbelievable moment occurs in Galveston that refutes the opening scene where our heroes ruthlessly tried to eliminate the outlaws. Jarrett wings Matson in a restaurant as the evildoer is poised to bushwhack Zack. That Joe and Zack would let Matson live is difficult to swallow, especially after their deadly shooting during the hold-up attempt. The brawl on the docks at the end looks like poor crowd control, but there is another surprise that comes out. However, by this time, "Four For Texas" has sacrificed any dramatic vigor as an interesting western. Unless you're a Rat Packer, skip "Four For Texas."
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