Customer Reviews

58
3.7 out of 5 stars
42 Fallacies
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:$0.99
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

205 of 215 people found the following review helpful
on June 6, 2011
the .99 i paid for this was worth it, so i could read it across my kindle app devices. but know that if you google the title, you'll find that the author kindly offers it as a free pdf online.

it's structured in a very concise format, listing one fallacy (with descriptions and explanations) after another. the table of contents is fully linked, as well.

not an extensive review, but hopefully helpful.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
68 of 72 people found the following review helpful
on April 22, 2011
I own and have read How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic by Madsen Pirie and Nonsense: A Handbook of Logical Fallacies by Robert J. Gula.

This book isn't as in-depth as those books but it's great for a quick reference of logic fallacies. An easy read--and for the price it's a great value.
33 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
31 of 33 people found the following review helpful
on October 27, 2011
For 99 cents this title is great. The author gives a brief explanation on each fallacy as well as 2-3 clear examples. Perfect for a reference guide but for more detailed examples I would recommend "Nonsense: Red Herrings, Straw Men and Sacred Cows".
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on January 4, 2014
Although the idea behind this book attracted me, the editing and presentation were awful.

This title needs structural editing to improve the stuffy writing style, reduce the redundancies, and enhance the content. The author then needs to hire a copy editor and proofreader to correct the countless solecisms.

With some effort, the author can make this book presentable.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
on November 2, 2012
...this one actually had some rigor to its analysis. I thought I knew all of the logical fallacies to disgrace our collective knowledge but turns out not so much. Everyone appreciates a book that can successfully deflate the ego. Fun fact: while I was a pithy undergrad studying philosophy using any of these in a paper would mean automatic failure - but when I was in law school, only these were expected.
22 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on February 10, 2013
I rate the content of the book a 4, but give the overal rating a 3 because I think the Kindle is the wrong media format for this type of material. This book is a series of stand alone topics and examples which I think is better handled on paper where you can thumb forward and backward through pages instead of the linear fashion of a Kindle. This book would make a great bathroom read because you can pick it up, pick a page and start reading. Very few chapters depend heavily on what came prior.

I did not read the book in one sitting, although it would be easy to do. I would read, set it down and then come back to it as I killed time waiting for my wife or a plane. What I found is as I would read the newspaper or listen to the news I would recognize a fallacy and want to find it in the book to confirm I had the right one. The Kindle for all its strengths and search capability is no match for the human brain grasping sentence fragments as one flips the pages quickly or jumps whole sections forward and backwards.

As for the content, I thought everything was clearly presented with many examples to show the points the author was trying to make. It is an excellent starter. It was a fun read.

One strong recommendation: If you are married or in a committed relationship, have your significant other read this as well. Nothing is worse than not only catching someone is a fallacy but calling it out by name! Been there. Done that.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon June 22, 2012
42 Fallacies by Dr. Michael C. LaBossiere

"42 Fallacies" is a very sound, introductory-level reference book about logical fallacies. Dr. LaBossiere provides a useful philosophical toolkit that helps avoid falling into common logical fallacies. This 83-page book is composed of forty-two common fallacies.

Positives:
1. Brief and to the point.
2. Sound format, each fallacy is presented in its native logical format, and an explanation and several examples are presented.
3. Introductory, accessible level.
4. Table of contents links to each fallacy.
5. Most popular common fallacies are presented.
6. Will help user construct sound logical arguments.

Negatives:
1. Lacks depth. It's a very basic book.
2. No frills or thrills, straight to the point. In other words, it's a little dry.

In summary, this is a very useful reference guide for the layperson. At less than a dollar this is a great Kindle value. It provides the most common logical fallacies and the author does a good job of providing intelligible examples. The book is very basic, so if you are looking for more depth look elsewhere otherwise enjoy it for what it is, a brief, introductory reference guide. I recommend it.

Further recommendations: "A Rulebook for Arguments" by Anthony Weston, "Philosophy of Science: A Very Short Introduction" by Samir Okasha, "How to Win Every Argument: The Use and Abuse of Logic by Madsen Pirie, "Being Logical: A Guide to Good Thinking" by D.Q. Mcirney, "Nonsense: Red Herrings, Straw Men and Sacred Cows: How We Abuse Logic in Our Everyday Language" Robert J. Gula, and "Come Let Us Reason: New Essays in Christian Apologetics" by Norman L. Geisler.
44 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
The initial definitions are a bit obtuse; but the examples are good. This is a very good critical reference list.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on June 20, 2012
42 FALLACIES is available freely online -- a quick search on Google will reveal a PDF available for free by the author.

With that said, 42 FALLACIES is a nice little handbook. It covers many of the logical fallacies that people use in everyday conversation. Each of the listed fallacies are accompanied with a quick summary, reasons why the fallacies is a failure of logic, and a few examples. The author doesn't intend this to be a complete guide to cognitive/logical fallacies. Instead, it is a handbook of definitions; accordingly, it doesn't make good beach reading.

I would recommend this to anyone with an interest in debate. Sure, there are better books out there (in terms of readability), but this is cheap, brief, and concise.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on January 29, 2015
This book is an informative and readable rundown of 42 common logical fallacies ranging from ad hominem to strawman to two wrongs make a right. The fallacies are explained in detail and examples are provided. A quick read that's fantastic for philosophy students or those simply trying to gain an edge in an argument.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
76 Fallacies
76 Fallacies by Michael LaBossiere
$0.99


 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations