Qty:1
FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Disc with little if any use.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • 42 Up
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

42 Up


Price: $27.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 2 left in stock.
Sold by Serenity-Now and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.
7 new from $16.01 24 used from $0.29 1 collectible from $75.00
Amazon Price New from Used from
DVD
"Please retry"
1-Disc Version
$27.99
$16.01 $0.29

Deal of the Week: Up to 62% Off "Monk: The Complete Series" on DVD and AIV
This 32-disc collection includes every episode from all 8 seasons with hours of behind-the-scenes bonus features, making Monk: The Complete Series a compulsively essential addition to any DVD obsessive’s collection. Learn more

Frequently Bought Together

42 Up + 49 Up + 56 Up
Price for all three: $67.24

Buy the selected items together

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?



Product Details

  • Actors: Bruce Balden, Jacqueline Bassett, Symon Basterfield, Andrew Brackfield, John Brisby
  • Format: Color, NTSC
  • Language: English (Unknown)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: FIRST RUN FEATURES
  • DVD Release Date: August 31, 2001
  • Run Time: 134 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (26 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005LDCB
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #311,906 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "42 Up" on IMDb

Special Features

  • Commentary track by director Michael Apted
  • Director biography and filmography
  • Coming attractions

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

In 1964, director Michael Apted interviewed a group of seven year old children for the documentary "7 Up." He's been back to film them every seven years. Now they are 42. From cab driver Tony to East End schoolmates Jackie, Lynn and Susan, and the heart

Review

One of the towering achievements in the history of documentary film. Endlessly rewarding. --Philadelphia Inquirer

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
23
4 star
2
3 star
1
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 26 customer reviews
I find it really hard to watch the tapes at all.
hitchon@engr.wisc.edu
I have no problem paying for this video as I feel it is money well deserved for all of those people who have made this possible for so many decades.
Sharon Jacobs
These are real people with real lives - makes you realize that we all struggle with similar problems and events.
Alison Kather

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

120 of 129 people found the following review helpful By hitchon@engr.wisc.edu on December 6, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
I am one of the people in this video - so I have strong feelings of various kinds about it. There's no denying it is powerful stuff - Roger Ebert lists this series among `The Great Movies' on his web site (right after `2001, a Space Odyssey' - which amazed me!)
What is good about it is that (first) the old film is like a time capsule - it's hard to believe we were ever like that; and (second) that it's like time lapse photography of a flower blooming (or something) - you see different things in people when you see their lives pass at high speed. If we saw enough people fast forwarded like this, we might really learn something. Finally, many people appreciate relating it to their own lives.
The bad part is that it is intensely humiliating to be shown answering the most personal questions I have ever seen anybody have to answer on TV. I find it really hard to watch the tapes at all. (So don't get the tape - let me sell you a book on engineering!)
(By the way - Apted did not direct the early stuff; he was involved, but it was his first job out of college.)
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
20 of 24 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 21, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
42 up is the next installment in apted's series. he took 14 seven year old british children and interviewed them. he has returned to film and interview them every seven years and they are now 42 years old (or they were when he filmed it in 1998). the most fascinating thing about this and his other films, is to see the development of a real person's dreams, goals, and reality over a lifetime.
people who have seen the others (7up, 14up...35up) will be fascinated to see the changes in the lives of these intriguing people. neil, the man who went from a cute, confident boy to a homeless, mentally ill adult, has a pretty drastic change happen in his life (i won't break the suspense) that past viewers will be anxious to see. this film comes highly recommended by all the film critics i have read, receiving at least 3 1/2 stars or more.
get this film before they turn 49.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Mark W Smith on October 14, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
Last week I purchased a video Roger Ebert identifies as one of the best films of all time, Michael Apted's "42 Up". And I wholeheartedly agree. This documentary, released in 2000, is one in a series of films that chronicles the lives of the same 14 people over the course of 35 years. The series' first installment was filmed in 1964. Fourteen, seven year old British children from various socioeconomic backgrounds, were interviewed about their lives, likes and dislikes, as well as their hopes and dreams for the future. Apted has tracked down each of these people every seven years, asking them the same, as well as other questions, to obtain their current status, their here-to-date accomplishments, as well as their disappointments. From each of these episodes of interviews, he has created another film, released shortly after filming, every seven years. The titles of the films denote the participant's ages; hence "7 Up", "14 Up", and so on.
The original premise of the series was to test a hypothesis based on an old Hebrew quotation, "Give me the child until the age of seven, and I will show you the man"; the point being that our ultimate status in life reflected by socioeconomic level, our values and culture, are largely determined by the family into which we are born. This question is particularly significant in class conscious Great Britain where class distinctions are particularly apparent, if not a mainstay of their culture. And, the series tends to affirm the hypothesis, as most of the film's protagonists remain in the same socioeconomic group throughout their lives.
The beauty of the film, however, is not in scientific investigation. And, one need not see the earlier films to appreciate the ones that follow.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By The Rocketman on November 28, 2004
Format: DVD
The whole series up to this film is finally available on DVD and is an awesome experience, much richer than this single film, as amazing as this single film is. I have discussed the reasons why one might prefer to get the entire series on DVD over on The Up Series (Seven Up / 7 Plus Seven / 21 Up / 28 Up / 35 Up / 42 Up).
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Haseeb on October 27, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
In 1964 filmmaker Micheal Apted interviewed a number of seven year olds in England from different economic backgrounds. He has been back to interview them every seven years. The subjects are 42 years old in this film.
This is perhaps the most fascinating and poignant documentary series I have ever seen and am likely to see. As you watch this film and see the drama of lives unfold well into middle age, you can't help but to be in awe. This film forces you to ponder on your own life and ask yourself questions. What have we been put on this earth for and what is the true meaning of life?
Without giving away the whole film, I will say that a few changes have taken place in peoples lives and most of them have progressed rather nicely since 35 Up. One of the subjects got divorced but is happily remarried at 42. Another subject was actually caught being unfaithful but was forgiven and is still married to the same person. One of the subjects finally gets married at the age of 42, but has concerns about trying to start a family so late. Some of the subjects who've been married for a long time talk about how hard marriage is. Other subjects who have teenagers talk about how difficult they can be. None of the subjects was incarcerated and none of them died yet. I hate to break it to the Neil fans, but he is not doing anything all that big dispite the rumors. Although he is still on welfare, he has managed to find some stability in his life and is keeping himself busy. He still more or less has the same demeanor he had at the age of 35.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


Serenity-Now Privacy Statement Serenity-Now Shipping Information Serenity-Now Returns & Exchanges