Customer Reviews


27 Reviews
5 star:
 (23)
4 star:
 (2)
3 star:
 (1)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


120 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A subjective point of view.
I am one of the people in this video - so I have strong feelings of various kinds about it. There's no denying it is powerful stuff - Roger Ebert lists this series among `The Great Movies' on his web site (right after `2001, a Space Odyssey' - which amazed me!)
What is good about it is that (first) the old film is like a time capsule - it's hard to believe we were...
Published on December 6, 2000 by hitchon@engr.wisc.edu

versus
3.0 out of 5 stars Not Revealing Enough
I'm 42 and could think of dozens of questions these people should have been asked. They are allowed to ramble when most seemed quite willing to get into more specifics. Perhaps if I had seen ALL the footage of ages 7, 14, 21, 28, and 35 I would have been more emotionally invested in them and the changes would seem more obvious. That being said, there are happy and sad...
Published 14 months ago by mr. contrarian


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

120 of 129 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A subjective point of view., December 6, 2000
This review is from: 42 Up [VHS] (VHS Tape)
I am one of the people in this video - so I have strong feelings of various kinds about it. There's no denying it is powerful stuff - Roger Ebert lists this series among `The Great Movies' on his web site (right after `2001, a Space Odyssey' - which amazed me!)
What is good about it is that (first) the old film is like a time capsule - it's hard to believe we were ever like that; and (second) that it's like time lapse photography of a flower blooming (or something) - you see different things in people when you see their lives pass at high speed. If we saw enough people fast forwarded like this, we might really learn something. Finally, many people appreciate relating it to their own lives.
The bad part is that it is intensely humiliating to be shown answering the most personal questions I have ever seen anybody have to answer on TV. I find it really hard to watch the tapes at all. (So don't get the tape - let me sell you a book on engineering!)
(By the way - Apted did not direct the early stuff; he was involved, but it was his first job out of college.)
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 24 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars apted just keeps getting better, September 21, 2000
By A Customer
This review is from: 42 Up [VHS] (VHS Tape)
42 up is the next installment in apted's series. he took 14 seven year old british children and interviewed them. he has returned to film and interview them every seven years and they are now 42 years old (or they were when he filmed it in 1998). the most fascinating thing about this and his other films, is to see the development of a real person's dreams, goals, and reality over a lifetime.
people who have seen the others (7up, 14up...35up) will be fascinated to see the changes in the lives of these intriguing people. neil, the man who went from a cute, confident boy to a homeless, mentally ill adult, has a pretty drastic change happen in his life (i won't break the suspense) that past viewers will be anxious to see. this film comes highly recommended by all the film critics i have read, receiving at least 3 1/2 stars or more.
get this film before they turn 49.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


13 of 15 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Before purchasing 42 UP, consider getting the whole series, November 28, 2004
By 
The Rocketman (Los Angeles, CA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: 42 Up (DVD)
The whole series up to this film is finally available on DVD and is an awesome experience, much richer than this single film, as amazing as this single film is. I have discussed the reasons why one might prefer to get the entire series on DVD over on The Up Series (Seven Up / 7 Plus Seven / 21 Up / 28 Up / 35 Up / 42 Up).
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One Of The Best, October 14, 2002
By 
Mark W Smith (Indianapolis, IN USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: 42 Up [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Last week I purchased a video Roger Ebert identifies as one of the best films of all time, Michael Apted's "42 Up". And I wholeheartedly agree. This documentary, released in 2000, is one in a series of films that chronicles the lives of the same 14 people over the course of 35 years. The series' first installment was filmed in 1964. Fourteen, seven year old British children from various socioeconomic backgrounds, were interviewed about their lives, likes and dislikes, as well as their hopes and dreams for the future. Apted has tracked down each of these people every seven years, asking them the same, as well as other questions, to obtain their current status, their here-to-date accomplishments, as well as their disappointments. From each of these episodes of interviews, he has created another film, released shortly after filming, every seven years. The titles of the films denote the participant's ages; hence "7 Up", "14 Up", and so on.
The original premise of the series was to test a hypothesis based on an old Hebrew quotation, "Give me the child until the age of seven, and I will show you the man"; the point being that our ultimate status in life reflected by socioeconomic level, our values and culture, are largely determined by the family into which we are born. This question is particularly significant in class conscious Great Britain where class distinctions are particularly apparent, if not a mainstay of their culture. And, the series tends to affirm the hypothesis, as most of the film's protagonists remain in the same socioeconomic group throughout their lives.
The beauty of the film, however, is not in scientific investigation. And, one need not see the earlier films to appreciate the ones that follow. In each successive documentary, Apted includes footage from the earlier releases, as well as outtakes that had not been seen previously. Each film stands alone, on its own merit. What we experience, as viewers, is the unfolding and development of lives over time, compressed into a few minutes. We witness their challenges, their satisfactions, and their evolving expectations of themselves. Although Apted's questions are relatively innocuous, through the course of our repeatedly hearing them and their answers, we gain a relatively intimate knowledge of who these people are, and what they want. At times, the camera is unflinchingly honest. The inconsistencies obvious. And, it is also noted that Apted has clearly developed a level of intimacy with his subjects, as they often refer to him in the interviews by his first name. Keep in mind that he first met these people when they were children, and he has periodically checked in with them for nearly as long as they can remember. It is not surprising then, that each film has garnered increasing interest in Great Britain, as those following the series began to anticipate the ongoing sagas and, in some instances, had developed a genuine caring for some of films participants. One individual, Neil, whose life has taken some very difficult turns, received considerable attention. Some met the release of "42 Up" with ambivalence, as they wanted to know what had happened to Neil, but also feared the worse. I can attest to similar feelings, having previously seen the episodes of "28" and "35".
Not all of the participants have been pleased with their involvement. One even went so far as to describe the experience as a curse that comes around every seven years. Some have opted out for some of the films; a couple have withdrawn permanently.
The value of this work, however, is not derived from voyeurism, but rather, from what is stirred from within ourselves. As we watch the film and observe life's many transitions, we cannot help but to reflect on our own; to take note of where we are, where we have been, and where we have wanted to be. Although "42 Up" was to have been the last in the series, there has been ongoing speculation about a "49". Perhaps that is more telling about our own aspirations, a statement that we are not done yet with our own lives, than being motivated by our curiosity about the lives of others.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars documentary filmmaking at its best, October 27, 2001
This review is from: 42 Up [VHS] (VHS Tape)
In 1964 filmmaker Micheal Apted interviewed a number of seven year olds in England from different economic backgrounds. He has been back to interview them every seven years. The subjects are 42 years old in this film.
This is perhaps the most fascinating and poignant documentary series I have ever seen and am likely to see. As you watch this film and see the drama of lives unfold well into middle age, you can't help but to be in awe. This film forces you to ponder on your own life and ask yourself questions. What have we been put on this earth for and what is the true meaning of life?
Without giving away the whole film, I will say that a few changes have taken place in peoples lives and most of them have progressed rather nicely since 35 Up. One of the subjects got divorced but is happily remarried at 42. Another subject was actually caught being unfaithful but was forgiven and is still married to the same person. One of the subjects finally gets married at the age of 42, but has concerns about trying to start a family so late. Some of the subjects who've been married for a long time talk about how hard marriage is. Other subjects who have teenagers talk about how difficult they can be. None of the subjects was incarcerated and none of them died yet. I hate to break it to the Neil fans, but he is not doing anything all that big dispite the rumors. Although he is still on welfare, he has managed to find some stability in his life and is keeping himself busy. He still more or less has the same demeanor he had at the age of 35.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars For anyone who cares about human beings, September 25, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: 42 Up (DVD)
These documentaries, when watched together, provide a wonderful portrait of what makes up a life. Anyone who cares about people will benefit from watching any or all the films in the series.
These documentaries are probably the greatest and most noble use of television since the medium was invented. Proof that television can actually benefit society and appeal to our best instincts, instead of what it usually does.
As a side note -- why don't they release all the films on one DVD box set? Seems like such a logical thing to do and I'm sure they'd sell a few. This series obviously has a built in audience.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A series that improves with time, January 29, 2007
This review is from: 42 Up (DVD)
The up series has followed the lives of 14 British individuals in seven year intervals beginning at age 7 (in 1963 or 64). Every seven years, the producer Michael Apted attempts to interview each of the individual children. For various reasons, some of the individuals are unwilling to be interviewed during a particular time (though most are present in each episode). In this segment, "42 Up", Apted interviews ten individuals: Andrew, Bruce, Jackie, Lynn, Neil, Nick, Paul, Suzy, Symon, and Tony.

On the whole, I found the individuals to be thoughtful and wistful. The mood is much different than "35 Up", where I was struck by the loss that many felt as their parents began to pass away (I am in a similar situation). There is more reflection on childhood and lost opportunities. Love for children and spouses is also evident. More than before, the individuals show strength and courage as they face the future.

In the commentary, it appears that Apted is beginning to realize that his previous segments sometimes provided disorted or incomplete views of the individual's lives. For example, in "28 Up", I think he provided some rather cruel clips on three of the individuals's wives. His edits would sometimes introduce condescending judgments. In this segment, it seems that he is allowing the individuals to speak without editorial moralizing or judgment. Though some of the individuals are still defensive, I think most of the interviews are more heartfelt as a result.

I was especially moved by the segments on Susan and Suzy. Both of these women are so honest and sensitive and their reflections are so true that I (the viewer) feels their pain in loss and the pride in their children. I am also appreciating Tony more now than before, when he did not allow any signs of weakness to show. In revealing himself, he is becoming a fuller person.

I think it is useful to see all the other segments before this one. I have become drawn into their lives. Thus, I feel Bruce's happiness and Lynn's hopes more than if I saw this segment before seeing the others. As a professor, I also strongly feel Nick's dilemma between his love for his childhood home and the love for his work that requires him to live elsewhere. I think that many people are involved in this type of situation that creates a loss no matter what he decides. Thus, the more he succeeds the less likely he can ever return home.

Missing are Charles, John, and Peter. This is sad because each of these individuals are articulate and smart. I miss each of them. John is so sharp and often provides strong counterpoint arguments against Apted's sometimes biased questions and views. I admit that John used to bug me quite a bit in his early years, but I now greatly miss his wit and insights. Peter also has strong opinions and I would be very interested in seeing how he dealt with the seemingly deadend career choice that his schooling prepared him for. Charles has now been missing for 21 years. In "14 Up" and "21 Up", he was a very intelligent person who was critical yet fair in his answers to various questions put to him by Apted. I got the impression that he was aware of Apted's agenda, yet tried to be fair instead of defensive in his self-analysis.

Last, I want to say that I feel that the individuals in these films are very fortunate because these videos provide a portrait of themselves that most of us have lost over the years. Though they rightfully acknowledge that these periodic interviews are painful and intrusive, they also memorialize their lives for their families. I personally remember little of my original dreams and hopes; they fade away over time. I wish that I could have had this opportunity every seven years, with the addendum that it would never be shown to the public. It would be something to give to my children when they are old enough to understand.

I rate this film four stars, not five, because I don't think the film lives up to its potential. That being said, I think that all in my generation could appreciate the candor that these individuals use in their confessions and their courage in revealing themselves to us.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Worth Missing, April 22, 2002
By 
Alison Kather (San Francisco, CA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: 42 Up (DVD)
This is a memorable documentary that is not worth missing. Watching these people grow throughout the years and change is amazing! These are real people with real lives - makes you realize that we all struggle with similar problems and events. You get to know these people and learn to care about them. It is even better if you can watch a few of the earlier ones first (28up, 35up). I can't wait for 49up to come!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A film of unparalleled value, September 17, 2001
By A Customer
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: 42 Up [VHS] (VHS Tape)
Partly because I am the same age, I feel a strong kinship to the men and women whose lives have been tracked in the "7 Up" documentary series. The film is powerful because it reminds us of our common human experience. Their stories evoke pain when we learn of failed relationships, career setbacks, and the inevitable crises of life that come, for example, with the death of parents. But they also emphasize the great joy that the subjects have found in their children and in their work, leaving one with an overall sense of hope and rejoicing. While the series initially placed great emphasis on class differences, almost hinting that the outcome of each life would hinge heavily on those differences, I think it has revealed something else -- that economic and social class may restrict one's choices and advantages but that they have little bearing on overall contentment. I am so glad Symon has decided to participate in the series again and to share his good news with us, and that Neil is on the path to a new life. While it must be excruciating to endure public scrutiny of one's life every seven years, those who continue to take part in the series have given us a great gift. I wish every one of them a lifetime of happiness.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The REAL reality, 40 years before it's time., May 16, 2002
This review is from: 42 Up [VHS] (VHS Tape)
With the immense popularity of the "reality shows" this documentary series, begun 40 years before its time, is the REAL reality. Since it is based on a curiosity about human development and not on some current Hollywood fad, it has a priceless honesty that cannot be replicated, including the current opting out by three who had had enough. It also shows many things about the documentors, documentary style, and technology over time that the participants may not realize is included in what is revealed. Views of both sides of the camera are important.
This fan of the "Up" series deeply hopes the "lost three" might return to share their wisdom at 49Up -- including how it was opting out. Did they miss it? What wisdom do they have to share with us? Presumably, if they do not return, they are telling us they made the right choice for themselves, but their fans will always wonder how things are going.
Thank you, participants, for giving this unique gift and assisting in the understanding of human development through life stages. Your fans love you and think you're very important. You are the cousins we never met.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 3 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

42 Up
42 Up by Bruce Balden (DVD - 2001)
$27.95
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.