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49:00

49:00

July 19, 2008
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1 43:55 Not Available


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: July 19, 2008
  • Label: Dry Wood Music
  • Copyright: 2008 Dry Wood Music
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001CZCBEA
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (51 customer reviews)

Customer Reviews

I expected a few great songs and lots of throwaways.
Jake Gittes
This song moves me and chills me to the bone; that is, for me, as good as music gets--as good as life gets.
Amazon Customer
The math is simple: 49 cents + 43:55 minutes of great music-making = five stars.
DTW

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

20 of 22 people found the following review helpful By S. D. Hudson on July 21, 2008
Albums used to be a journey. Not anymore, especially in this era of cherry-picking favorite downloadable tracks. It's ironic then that Paul Westerberg, who famously has never used a computer, has released a download that leads us through a variety of emotions, including both elation and frustration.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By johnnyqb on July 23, 2008
Verified Purchase
My first impressions are that Westerberg has completed the process of finding his post-Replacement self. He is no longer trying to be Mr. Replacement, and is no longer trying to be some fake James Taylor troubled singer-songwriter. He seems to have, in a phrase, found himself musically. This record is a complete delight, and essential for any Replacements fan. The melodies are great and natural, the guitars rock without pretension, the vocals natural and hearty. This is Paul at his best.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By ih8music on July 22, 2008
Wow, what a bold idea. Smash together a bunch of home recordings - some complete songs, some just little snippets - bundle it all up as a single track so it plays like an old LP, and sell it on the internet for next to nothing. Genius!

The "album" starts off in a pretty typical Westerberg fashion, with 4 complete (& excellent) songs that could have easily been on his most recent solo effort, Folker. Then at around the 14 minute mark, we start to hear some overlapping tracks, only to be thrust into the rocking "Devil Raised a Good Boy" (best song here, IMO). From that point on, all bets are off and we're taken on a journey through the beautiful chaos that is Paul Westerberg's musical mind.

At times, it sounds as if you're tuned to the coolest radio station on the planet. Or, rather, like you're turning the dial amongst a bunch of cool radio stations.

The album fittingly ends with a series of short covers that make you want a full-length album of nothing other than covers from Westerberg. And then he rocks out with his kid on the final track, which I like to call "father of the year."

This album isn't for everyone, as it is rough and chaotic at times. But if you just go with it and let Westerberg take you on this musical journey, you'll be greatly rewarded.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kent on July 21, 2008
Verified Purchase
When I woke up this morning I had no idea I would be listening to a new batch of Paul Westerberg recordings this evening, but life sometimes gives us little jewels like this. This is an intimate and sublime series of songs and pop-collages--A must have for all who appreciate excellent song writing and raw yet somehow perfect basement production. After three passes through 49:00 I'm again convinced that Paul Westerberg is one of America's most talented, complex, and important living songwriters.

The only thing more perplexing is the ridiculously low price.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Gorman Bechard on July 26, 2008
Verified Purchase
The best record I've heard in at least a few years. Like a stream of consciousness, make that a river, the rapids of consciousness from the greatest song writer of all time. It's rock, it's country, it's anything and everything, it's grabs you by the heart and throat, and takes you on this magical mystery tour of Westerberg's soul. With never so much as a beat to breathe, PW layers track upon track, snippets upon full songs. (Sort of like an old time Mats sshow!) I was enthralled, I was in awe, I was exhausted (in a good way). I cried when it was over the first time.

This is what it's all about! Right here. And you can freakin' get it for 49 cents. Damn you, Paul! You gave me life again!

P.S. Here's what the good folks at the PW fan site believe the track listing to be. The titles are good (hearted) guesses. Thanks to PaulWesterberg.com for this info.

Who You Gonna Marry? - 00:00
Kentucky Risin' - 03:57
Something in My Life is Missing - 06:57
Visitor's Day - 10:38
Thoroughbred - 14:14
Devil Raised a Good Boy - 14:28
You're My Girl - 17:38
Everyone's Stupid - 18:04
You're My Girl (Reprise) - 20:42
What Do You Want? - 20:48
Never Coming Back - 21:07
Goodnight, Sweet Prince - 21:52
Guess I'll Be Going Then - 25.47
Outta My System - 25:54
C'mon, Be My Darling - 29:16
Down on the Farm - 33:01
100,00 Pieces - 33:12
I'm Clean - 34:24
Your Sister - 35:35
It'll Never Die - 35:43
Short Cover Medley* - 39:46
I Think I Love You - 40:41
Oh Yeah! - 41:46

*The medley includes: "Hello Goodbye" - The Beatles; "Lost Highway" - Hank Williams; "Born To Be Wild" - Steppenwolf; "Stupid Girl" - Rolling Stones; "I'm Eighteen" - Alice Cooper; "I Am A Rock" - Simon and Garfunkel; "Rocket Man" - Elton John; "Dandy" - The Kinks
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Jake Gittes on July 22, 2008
The most pleasant musical surprise I've had this year. If you're a fan of Westerberg's self-recorded cds like Mono/Stereo and Folker there's lots to enjoy here. I expected a few great songs and lots of throwaways. I got the opposite.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Ken L. on July 22, 2008
Last May, famous violinist Philippe Quint put on an informal concert for Newark cabbies at an airport, in effort to thank cab driver Mohamed Khalil for returning the precious (and priceless) instrument he'd left in his cab by mistake. Paul's 49:00 feels as rare an experience. These songs sound like tunes written under the belief that they'd never be heard by the public. As such they give us the truest opportunity in years to hang out with Paul (the guy, the dad, the grocery shopper) in his basement.

The album offers a unique ride. My friend Jason said it nicely: "It's like 43 minutes of a kid spinning the tuning dial of his radio, trying to find something he likes." Paul sings, "I gotta get it outta my system!" You get the sense of a seasoned songwriter / recordist doing just that - working through the daily build up of psychological muck and forging it into all manner of songs: bouncy-groovers, straight-rockers, unadorned heartbreaker-ballads, etc.

49:00 is like an Mp3 version of Atari's Asteroids. Bits and piece of songs collide, invade each other's space impolitely, overlap and undercut one another. In "Good Night Sweet Prince" (a song chronicling the sickness and death of a husband/father), the fusion of two different songs strengthens the theme. A second song rudely barges in and altogether hijacks the left speaker from the crooning story-teller (much in the same way an illness can muscle its unwelcome way into a person's life, challenging him or her to stretch and adapt).

Lots of opportunity here for longtime listeners to celebrate their shared past with Paul. Tunes like "Devilish Goodboy" prove Paul is still in touch with his inner "Black Diamond." The guitar lead on "Be My Darlin'" haunts as thoroughly as does "Go" from Stink.
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