Kindle Price: $2.99

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

500 Ways To Tell A Better Story Kindle Edition

4.4 out of 5 stars 33 customer reviews

See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$2.99

Length: 177 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

Kindle Daily Deals
Kindle Delivers: Daily Deals
Subscribe to find out about each day's Kindle Daily Deals for adults and young readers. Learn more (U.S. customers only)

Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.


Product Details

  • File Size: 567 KB
  • Print Length: 177 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: Terribleminds; First edition (June 22, 2012)
  • Publication Date: June 22, 2012
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B008E71JC4
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #244,080 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images or tell us about a lower price?


More About the Author

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

Chuck Wendig is the New York Times bestselling author of Star Wars: Aftermath, as well as the Miriam Black thrillers, the Atlanta Burns books, and the Heartland YA series, alongside other works across comics, games, film, and more. A finalist for the John W. Campbell Award for Best New Writer and the cowriter of the Emmy-nominated digital narrative Collapsus, he is also known for his popular blog, terribleminds.com, and his books about writing. He lives in Pennsylvania with his family.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I like Chuck Wendig's penly persona. Not everyone will. Chuck is one of the more prolific non-algorithmic list generators that I am aware of (never end a sentence with a preposition). If you are wondering how 500 Ways to Tell a Better Story might help you become a better writer, I'll fill in the blanks. Mr. Wendig lays out 500 tips broken into lists of 25 semi-related ideas. So you get categories like: 25 Reasons You Should Quit Writing and individual items like: "Deny anybody who wants you to work for free. If you work for free, that's something you do, not something someone asks of you -- doubly true where they're making money and you're not. They might as well ask you to bend over and stick tennis balls up your poopchute for the pleasure of an audience without you getting even the benefit of a reach-around. Or health care. Or free tennis lessons! Stories have value. Storytellers have value. Anybody who says different should be thrown into a wood chipper and used for mulch."

The advice is practical. If it doesn't get you off your butt and get you writing, nothing probably will. Why not five stars? The Kindle book links don't resolve correctly. Clicking on 25 Reasons to Quit Writing takes you to a different section. The Kindle Table of Contents page was missing in my e-copy. I had to keep scrolling back to the very top and manually finding hyperlinks to the sections I wanted to peruse first. Having whined about those minor issues, there are still 500 tips on how to be an effective writer. If that's your goal, there is sure to be something in here for you. I think five of the tips, applied to my writing life, well worth the price I paid for the 500.

If you don't like "foul" language none of Chuck's work is going to be appropriate for you.
Read more ›
4 Comments 17 of 18 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
If you have read some other books on writing, don't buy this one. Unless you have absolutely nothing to do and you are a particular lover of foul language and fraternity jokes. The title is misleading - at least, half of this book has nothing to do with telling better stories (choice of publishers? Really? How?). Nothing new in it either and it largely repeats his "250 Things You Should Know About Writing" without adding anything substantial.
Comment 7 of 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Regular readers of my reviews will be in no doubt as to my regard for the profanity-laden, wisdom-hammering excesses of Chuck Wendig. Better Story is his sixth (and perhaps final) collection of essays, culled from weekly posts at his weblog terribleminds.com, on the psychology, craft, dangers and business of writing. Once again I have nothing but praise. All of these essays - each of which comprises a 25-dot-point commentary on some aspect of writing from creating interesting characters and writing better sex to avoiding self-defeating habits and deciding to going pro - are available for free from the website. But having them collected together for easy e-reference is well worth your three bucks.

Highlight in this outing include the ascerbic '25 Thing I Want to Say to So-called 'Aspiring' Writers' ("Write...write better than you did yesterday and better tomorrow than you did today"); '25 Things Writers Should Know about Creating Mystery' ("The audience must not be left comfortable. They should be forced to stare at those dark corners as long as they can stand it"); and of course, the ever-popular '25 Ways to Un[deleted] Your Story' ("Go through every sentence with pruning shears. Cut out junk language like so many fatty tumours. Dead-head your darlings.")

Amongst a constant stream of imaginative new profanities, unsettling imagery and jokes about dead unicorns and chainsaw-wielding hookers, Wendig's writing advice is solid, unsentimental and above all useful. He fixes his drunkenly roving attention on everything that is transcendant and vexatious about the art and craft of writing. He takes his readers' hands in an only slightly shaky grip and steers them through the slurping quagmires of the publishing industry, online community-building and their own self-doubt. He leads them to writing, and it's good.
Comment 3 of 4 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is chock full of tidbits about writing, not writing, use of the internet blah, blah, blah related to the writing process, but has next to nothing to do with telling a better story. A review (one star) of another book similar to this that he wrote was, in part, and I quote:

"If this author actually had anything helpful to say it was impossible to find. The book is a conglomeration of abusive statements, excessive swearing, arrogant side tracking and blatant lack of any sense of how to convey ideas> To which he replied in another book "It's pretty (cuss word) accurate."

The same review could be written here, except I disagree on one point. The author can, in his own way, convey ideas. Unfortunately they are about writing in general and have little to do with telling a better story as the title would have one believe.

I expected things like when to use narration vs. flashback, ways to have plot threads tied together better, ways to have constant threads running differently through a story, how to improve the pacing of a story, how to build suspense, how to hide mysteries in plain sight.

Silly me...
Comment 1 of 1 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?