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89 of 91 people found the following review helpful
on June 4, 2007
I've owned 5 different B+W MRC filters and all have been excellent. This filter is no exception. The polarizing capacity is very strong with this filter and it does an excellent job of reducing glare, reducing blue polarized light in the sky, reducing reflection, etc. Build quality is very high and the level of rotating friction feels just right.

The MRC designation is your cue that this filter will not produce ghost images when used on digital SLRs due to an anti-reflectivity coating put on both surfaces of the glass. Hence the large increase in price when the MRC designation is present.
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139 of 147 people found the following review helpful
on April 2, 2006
Ever wondered how some pictures get that really dark blue sky in them? It's really as easy screwing on a MRC Polarizer filter, and while you're at it you might as well use the B+W.

Polarizer filters increase the saturation as seen by the camera which helps to make the deep colors you see in photo books. Additionally, a Polarizer filter will remove haze from outdoor shots making them sharper AND will cut reflection from water, windows, and foliage - something you can't do yourself afterwards with Photoshop.

Keep in mind that using a filter like this will decrease your light by two stops and that you have to rotate the filter every time you move to ensure you're getting the right effect. Also, you have to use a filter like this only under the right conditions. Most of the time you won't need it but when you do it will make your picture A LOT better.

Since you're attaching a filter to the end of your lens you're introducing the possibility of degrading the final image. While you can use a B+W (or a Heliopan) filter with any lens BEWARE of using the cheap filters you find at your local camera store. If you're taking pictures that are important to you it is absolutely worth the extra money to get a good filter for your lens.
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80 of 87 people found the following review helpful
There are a number of things you can do to modify a digital image using digital image editing programs. Lots of special effects may easily be added after the image has been made. But polarizing filters are almost magical. You see, they cut reflections and glare, and provide images with more rich colors, and for everything except metal, reduced glare and reflection. These are things that can be difficult or impossible to do, no matter how good you are with a digital image editing program.

Yes, the filter is costly. Magic never comes cheaply. In fact, the filter is made to rotate once installed so there are extra moving parts not found on most filters. Then there is the high-quality coating that helps with flare caused by the filter. There's a cost for this too. But when all is said and done, it's worth every last penny of the cost for the results you can get.

The circular polarizer is necessary for single-lens-reflex (SLR) cameras that use auto-focus and metering systems because many of these cameras' systems would be adversely affected by linear polarizing filters. So if you have a recent, auto-focus, through-the-lens metering camera, you probably should be using a circular polarizing filter - check your camera manual if you are not sure.

This in my experience is the most useful filter available and worth every penny. Unlike the Skylight or UV filters sold because "you need to protect your lens" or "cut UV-haze". Just remember that todays modern lenses have very hard glass, hard lens coatings, and that almost no UV rays pass through glass and today's multi-coated lenses. Unlike the polarizing filter, the Skylight and UV filters are a waste of your money unless you are truly shooting in a very hostile environment. Save the money you would have spent on these profit makers for the camera store and buy a filter that will actually make an immediate difference in your photography - a polarizing filter!
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful
on April 4, 2009
I have circular polarizers by a few other manufacturers (Sigma, Hoya, and one that has no name on it that came with a used lens I bought), and of the lot, I like the B+W the best. Its optical quality is excellent (one takes this for granted with B+W): no visible distortion, with good multi-coating to reduce flare. It is also wonderfully well constructed. It screws into place on my lens very smoothly. The rotating ring is damped a bit more than the ones on my other polarizers, requiring a little more effort to turn -- not so much as to be difficult or annoying, but enough to give it the feeling of a very solid, precision-made instrument that won't drift out of position by itself.

B+W filters are not cheap, but they're the best.
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26 of 27 people found the following review helpful
My story: Started with cheap polarizer. Used it for years. Then I bought this one. Now I know what a REAL polarizer will do - EVENLY COLORED SKIES! The cheap ones give uneven color in the sky. Yuck. Just skip the cheapie and go straight for the good stuff.
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18 of 18 people found the following review helpful
on September 14, 2007
I bought this filter after owning a number of other CL Polarizing filters. When I took this filter out of the packaging, I could tell it was exceptionally well-made. The glass is clean and the case is metal. I will not buy another brand of filter anymore.
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25 of 28 people found the following review helpful
on July 8, 2007
Great quality in B+W and no complaints with this filter. It is lubricated so you can turn it and the oil made it onto on of my cleaning cloths. I guess this would happen with any circ. polarizer. Slight vingetting on wide angle (10mm-17mm) lenses. Get the slim one if it will bother you.
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20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
on August 23, 2007
This filter is a bit expensive, but worth every penny. I purchased this filter for the Canon 50mm f1.4 lense on my Rebel XT. It creates wonderful dark blue skys. I uploaded two sample images as examples.
review image review image
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2009
I've used filters by many manufacturers, including Nikon, Hoya and Tiffen on my Nikon pro lenses. B+W filters are far and away the best. Superb quality glass and great craftsmanship make these a must for any serious photographer. Yes, they cost a little more, but why would you put a second-rate filter on a $1000+ lens?
You can't go wrong with B+W.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
on April 12, 2009
I purchased this B+W CP filter to use on my Nikkor 24-70 f/2.8 . The fit is tight, but east for me to remove when i need to. It rotates smoothly and is extremely well built. After using it several times, I was so happy with it that I purchased the UV filter. I have not noticed ANY loss in image quality. My images are still extremely sharp with fantastic color. If you need a circular polarizer, you cannot go wrong with this B+W CP filter. It will keep the images looking stellar. I highly recommend it for high end lenses.
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