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'68 Kindle Edition

4 customer reviews

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Length: 136 pages

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Now available for the first time in English, Mexican author and essayist Taibo’s beautifully realized memoir of the Oct. 1968 Tlatelolco student massacre in Mexico City documents "The Movement" of students that, at one point, was half a million strong. Taibo begins more than a decade before the massacre, when the movement was inchoate and the "invisible enemy" was purely an intellectual concern. He evokes relationships, passions and arguments lovingly. (Relevant section titles include "Of Women and Mattresses," "And Sometimes We Believe in the Informative Value of Tremors Running Through the Atmosphere" and "In Which the Virtues of the National Anthem Are Rediscovered.") The Cuban revolution and the Vietnamese resistance galvanized democratic idealists across Mexico, and The Movement turned to action: widespread propaganda dispersion, silent demonstrations, flash rallies, community organizing and the 123-day strikes in high schools and universities across the country. Then, as the impact of the student revolt in Paris in May 1968 reverberated throughout the world and governments became increasingly reactive, 200 protesting students were murdered in Tlatelolco Square by government military police, and hundreds more were arrested and jailed. In the days and weeks following, the corpses of the slain students disappeared, the facts were contorted by government-controlled media, and reality turned to myth. Today, over 35 years later, much of the truth remains uncovered, but Taibo’s memoir goes a long way toward setting the record straight.
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Review

Now available for the first time in English, Mexican author and essayist Taibo’s beautifully realized memoir of the Oct. 1968 Tlatelolco student massacre in Mexico City documents "The Movement" of students that, at one point, was half a million strong. Taibo begins more than a decade before the massacre, when the movement was inchoate and the "invisible enemy" was purely an intellectual concern. He evokes relationships, passions and arguments lovingly. (Relevant section titles include "Of Women and Mattresses," "And Sometimes We Believe in the Informative Value of Tremors Running Through the Atmosphere" and "In Which the Virtues of the National Anthem Are Rediscovered.") The Cuban revolution and the Vietnamese resistance galvanized democratic idealists across Mexico, and The Movement turned to action: widespread propaganda dispersion, silent demonstrations, flash rallies, community organizing and the 123-day strikes in high schools and universities across the country. Then, as the impact of the student revolt in Paris in May 1968 reverberated throughout the world and governments became increasingly reactive, 200 protesting students were murdered in Tlatelolco Square by government military police, and hundreds more were arrested and jailed. In the days and weeks following, the corpses of the slain students disappeared, the facts were contorted by government-controlled media, and reality turned to myth. Today, over 35 years later, much of the truth remains uncovered, but Taibo’s memoir goes a long way toward setting the record straight.—Publishers Weekly

Product Details

  • File Size: 173 KB
  • Print Length: 136 pages
  • Publisher: Seven Stories Press (January 4, 2011)
  • Publication Date: January 4, 2011
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B003R7L052
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #754,844 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Robert Blake on February 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
Paco Ignacio Taibo II, considered by many to be Mexico's greatest modern writer, dives into his memories of 40 years past to recollect a time when the world was turning upside down, when political movements were more than just slogans, and when revolution was something the young deeply aspired to. "68" is a powerful, fascinating look at 1960s Mexico, while America was celebrating flower power, Latin America's own youth was inspired and captivated by the possibility of socialist revolution inspired by events in Cuba and figures like Che Guevara. The mass student movement culminated in a notorious chapter of Mexican history: The October massacre in Tlatelolco Square where hundreds, possibly thousands of people were shot down by government troops in an even still shrouded in mystery and official denial. Taibo is the perfect choice to write on the subject considering he lived through it, he was one of the students marching in the streets of Mexico City that year and still a Leftist, having written the definitive Che bio, "Guevara, Also Known As Che." His chronicle here is a nostalgic, interesting, never boring slice of memory. He meticulously captures the culture of the time, not just politically but socially, showing us a conservative country rattled by the emergence of hippies and miniskirts, with students studying Marx and traveling to Havana to drink in the idea of utopian revolution. He also captures the dark side of the times, the brutal government repression, troops invading campuses in ways that make the 60s campus battles in the U.S. seem like child's play. There are comic side stories that dip into the more light-hearted side of youth and discovery, but always full of intrigue, consider Taibo lamenting his girlfriend leaving him for a "student" that turned out to be a government informant.Read more ›
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By T. Porges on March 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is what primary-source, first-person history is supposed to be like, and it's written with regret -- regret, specifically, that Taibo II finds himself alone as the memorialist of the rebellion and massacres of 1968. History has made Mexico City into the empty center of the events of that year, and the place where so much of what was to follow, from the Dirty War in Argentina to, ultimately, the Zapatista rebellion in Chiapas, found its beginning. This is essential history; a book that every school library should have.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This was the first non-fiction that I've read from Sr. Taibo. He brought the same attention to detail and sense of place to '68 that he brought to his detective novels.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I felt like I was there with the students of '68. Biased? No doubt, but that's not the point. The vivid view from the left of the barricades is what counts.
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