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Showing 1-10 of 12 reviews(1 star). Show all reviews
on November 10, 1999
INTERESTING CONCEPT, TEDIOUSLY REPEATED.
I suggest readers borrow this book from a public library and take Richard Koch's Oxford tutor's advice (found on Page 25): "Read the conclusion, then the introduction, then the conclusion again, then dip lightly into any interesting bits.'
More than 80 per cent of the value of this book can be found in 20 per cent or fewer of its pages, and absorbed in less than 20 per cent of the time most people would take to read it through.
Thus re-confirming the 80/20 Principle.
QED
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on January 10, 2006
The 20% you need to know: This book is poorly written, and the author would do well to use the 80/20 principle in his writing.

The 80% that will make up the rest of the review: I have never read such boring prose. I've had the concept fully explained to me. I fully understand what the principle is. I have heard it about 80 times now when 20 would have been enough (actually, once would have been enough). Now, what do I do with it? How do I implement it into my life? I am now on page 53 and he still hasn't gotten around to that part. It seems to me he should have used the theory when writing this book. Cut to the chase! Give me the top 20% of useful information so I can go ahead and use it to increase my productivity and effectiveness by 80%. Instead I get the feeling I'm wandering around aimlessly in the bottom part of his bar charts among the 80% of fluff to fill up his book quota. How many stories about economists and computer software do we really need? I don't know about you, but I wanted to increase my productivity by using my time better, and reading this book so far has been a complete waste of it.
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on August 26, 2012
I guess I shouldn't have been surprised. After all, this is a business book. It comes complete with tons of graphs and tables and charts. Lots of business references. It's also written for an audience that likes to read three words when one will do. It borders on the legalese.

I had heard of the 80/20 Principle and I even knew a little about the history of how it was "discovered" and developed over the centuries. What I was hoping, in this book, was ways that it could be applied to modern life. Indeed, toward the end of the book, which I only skimmed because I just couldn't take the obtuse writing style after about 3 chapters, it does talk a little about applying the 80/20 Principle. But, it's mostly a regurgitation of self help clap trap.

- Delegate
- Prioritize
- Play to your strengths.

and so on.

Nothing new or interesting and the writing is way too dense. I'm amazed he was coaxed into writing two other books to follow on to this one. I had them on my Wish List at one point but took them off after this book.
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on January 26, 2014
My issue with this book is that the main point of this book is covered in 10 page. At the end off the day, this should have been a blog post or an article. There is not enough here to make a whole book worth reading. Once you learn what 80/20 rule is, you can think up the rest on your own without paying for the book. Look up the 80/20 rule on Google and skip this one.
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on August 3, 1999
I was very disappointed with this book. The premise is very strong - 20% of your efforts produce 80% of your results and 80% of your efforts produce 20% of your results so focus on the most important 20%. Rather than buying the book simply repeat that 10,000 times and you get the exact same experience. Sure the book points out that 20% of your customers produce 80% of your sales and probably your problems but the book comes up very short on practical ways of using the 20/80 principle. Covey's First Things First is more practical and more succinct on the subject. Save your money for another book.
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on August 15, 2015
chapter completely missing from book and binding un done as a result . Received in this condition
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on October 19, 2000
This is a book shallow in content. The financial suggestions, which state that most of the money should be invested in a relatively few stocks are not only misleading but also very foolish. He argues that 80% of our investment profit comes from only 20% or fewer of our portfolios, but my question is : 'which 20%' ??? I think all of us will not hesitate to invest all our money on a particular stock if we know for SURE it will give us profit. But do you dare to invest as what Mr. Koch suggests 'put all your eggs in a basket and watch it like a hawk' without knowing exactly what will happen next second?
Despite the fact Mr. Koch boasts himself as a Wharton-graduated MBA and a really smart guy, his writing lacks insightful comments and deep thoughts. His writing on financial management is just a joke. Ahh, I forgot, on studying 'techniques', he says that we should not read but browse through our text books. Instead of paying serious effort to study, he suggests we should 'guess' and study for 20% of the material that will likely be asked in the exam questions.
I invite all readers to read and compare his and Stephen Covey's book. You will see what I mean.
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on May 17, 1999
Koch keeps babbling on about 80/20. 80% of his text is the number 80! Come on. There is little substance on how to apply the 80/20 rule. Rather, he just goes off and spouts examples of it in action. It bordered on religion!
I found more value in The Seven Habits than I did in this book. This is the type of prose and quality you can expect from a self-published author.
Save your money and buy the book on sale to use for firewood. My 20% worth...
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on November 29, 2015
The summary of the book is basically repeated over and over again. My guess is that the words, "the 80/20 principle" are repeated at least 100 times in the first 3 chapters alone.
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on February 11, 2016
Put it down mid way, this book reads like a bloated essay. The author is clearly trying to meet a word quota. Very little real content.
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