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809 Jacob Street Kindle Edition

3.9 out of 5 stars 32 customer reviews

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Length: 196 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

Review

"I wasn't quite prepared for how accomplished this little novel turned out to be. Evoking those stories of old with his motley crew of kids (1980's horror fiction), Marty gives the reader a subtle coming-of-age tale while also delivering cerebral prose that becomes almost narcotizing after a while. Here, there is a slow build of tension that is somewhat effortless ... as if 809 Jacob Street was a latter novel in the author's resume." - Matt Tait, Hellnotes review

"Marty Young's 809 Jacob Street dragged me through the gutter, and had me enthralled with every page. The story explores so thoroughly a nightmare of tortured emotions and madness that it's hard to believe it isn't autobiographical. The characters, especially Joey Blue, are that convincing. This is a writer cutting his own way through horror, and I can't wait to see where his journey takes him. I, for one, will be watching from here on out, because he made me a fan with this book." - Joe McKinney, Bram Stoker Award-winning author of Flesh Eaters and Dead City

"A refreshingly hypnotic tale that blends Monster Squad and the small-town coming-of-age themes of Stephen King to his own dark and surreal ends." - Robert Hood, author of Fragments of a Broken Land: Valarl Undead

"This book gets scary... You need to buy this book, you need to get it." - The Witching Hour Paranormal Radio Show on 4ZZZ

"A slow burning exploration of psychic terror that builds to a startling climax and the beginning of an even deeper mystery. Recommended!" - Greg Chapman, author of The Last Night of October

"809 Jacob Street is a wonderful first novel for Marty Young and first release for new Publisher, Black Beacon Books. Highly recommended." - Frank Michaels Errington, Horror-Web.com

About the Author

Marty Young (martyyoung.com) is a Bram Stoker-nominated and Australian Shadows Award-winning writer and editor, and sometimes ghost hunter. He was the founding President of the Australian Horror Writers Association from 2005-2010, and one of the creative minds behind the internationally acclaimed Midnight Echo magazine, for which he also served as Executive Editor until mid-2013.

Marty's first novel, 809 Jacob Street, was published in 2013 by Black Beacon Books, and won the Australian Shadows Award for Best Horror Novel. His novel was also given an Honorable Mention in Shelf Unbound's Page Turner competition.

His short horror fiction has been nominated for both the Australian Shadows and Ditmar awards, reprinted in Australian Dark Fantasy and Horror ('the best of 2008'), and repeatedly included in year's best recommended reading lists. Marty's essays on horror literature have been published in journals and university textbooks in Australia and India, and he was also co-editor of the award winning Macabre; A Journey through Australia's Darkest Fears, a landmark anthology showcasing the best Australian horror stories from 1836 to the present.

When not writing, he spends his time in the deep dark jungles of Papua New Guinea as a palynologist, whatever the heck that is.

Product Details

  • File Size: 2740 KB
  • Print Length: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Black Beacon Books; 1 edition (October 9, 2013)
  • Publication Date: October 9, 2013
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00FRKCTNE
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #649,363 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Marty Young (www.martyyoung.com) is a Bram Stoker-nominated and Australian Shadows Award-winning writer and editor, and sometimes ghost hunter. He was the founding President of the Australian Horror Writers Association from 2005-2010, and one of the creative minds behind the internationally acclaimed Midnight Echo magazine, for which he also served as Executive Editor until mid-2013.

Marty's first novel, 809 Jacob Street, was published in 2013 by Black Beacon Books, and won the Australian Shadows Award for Best Horror Novel. His novel was also given an Honorable Mention in Shelf Unbound's Page Turner competition.

His short horror fiction has been nominated for both the Australian Shadows and Ditmar awards, reprinted in Australian Dark Fantasy and Horror ('the best of 2008'), and repeatedly included in year's best recommended reading lists. Marty's essays on horror literature have been published in journals and university textbooks in Australia and India, and he was also co-editor of the award winning Macabre; A Journey through Australia's Darkest Fears, a landmark anthology showcasing the best Australian horror stories from 1836 to the present.

When not writing, he spends his time in the deep dark jungles of Papua New Guinea as a palynologist, whatever the heck that is.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition
Full disclosure: This novel is published by Black Beacon Books, who are publishing my début in January 2014. That said, I want to be very clear: I bought and paid for this novella myself, and I am writing this review 100% unsolicited. If I didn't have anything nice to say, I would say nothing.

I have a lot of nice things to say.

I finished 809 Jacob Street two days ago, and so far, I've been unable to read anything else. I begin to read, and my mind just starts drifting back to this novella. It's... OK, yeah, it's haunting me.

Marty Young is a writer of rare talent. He manages to interweave the mundane and supernatural so skilfully you never see or feel the joins. He draws you outside the lines, behind the curtain, out of the blue and into the black, and does it with such grace and skill that it's only in retrospect that you realise how dark your surroundings have become, how unfamiliar the landmarks are.

How far away you are from home.

That same alienation, the same feeling of slipping through the cracks, haunts the two main protagonists of this tale. Mr. Young carries us along the twin tracks of the narrative effortlessly, building the sense of wrongness and dislocation brick by careful brick. He also introduces us to the best realised group of child characters I've encountered in a horror tale since Stephen King's IT.

To say any more would be to deny you the pleasure of discovery. I have no intention of doing this. But I urge you to treat yourself to a trip down Jacob Street.

You will come back changed.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I thoroughly enjoyed this short novel. By effectively blurring the line between the inner and outer worlds of its characters, 809 Jacob Street gives new life to the standard haunted house story. It's a dark and powerful tale of small-town paranoia, communal and personal terror, and the reality of monsters. Young has produced a refreshingly hypnotic tale here, one that blends Monster Squad and the small-town coming-of-age themes of Stephen King to his own dark and surreal ends.
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Format: Kindle Edition
There's a lot more to this book than the title and the cover suggest. More than just a story of a haunted house, this is a slow-burning tale of haunted people in a haunted town. At turns vicious and gut-wrenching, Young drags the reader through the dark underbelly of small town with a hook through the shoulderblades.

I read this book slowly at first, as it takes a little bit to get the pace up, but by the time I was halfway through I didn't want to stop reading. Well worth the creeping and intense buildup, with a nice, vengeful twist to finish it. Highly recommend this to anyone who likes Stephen King, but with a bit more punch.
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Format: Kindle Edition
I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review

I thoroughly enjoyed reading this book. I laughed out loud the first time I read Joey Blue saying, “Hell ‘n heck” and “Damn an’ blast.” I think “Hell ‘n heck” will become a part of my vocabulary lol

Part of me wished it was longer and maybe had a little more gore in it, but I was satisfied with the character development and story line. It was very well written. The book didn’t show/tell us how the house became as it was – evil. However, being the house was used as stories to tell unruly children to get them behave is fitting. It’s one of those ‘are monsters real?’ books and this book does provide the answer in a creative way.

I write poetry and really enjoyed how it seemed the author was poetic in some of his descriptions of events, physical things, memories, etc. below are some examples of what I mean -

“His memories trailed off into the fog, losing color and detail ‘til there was nothing left of them. …

Rusted pipes dripped a slow melody, watering the weeds below the. A few barred windows stared down upon him from the two story buildings as he stopped and stared about.

But standing there, the song of the scotch was deafening, so enticing and mesmerizing, offering such wanton promises and protection from past deeds –

The wind was wild about him, tugging his coat and battering him about the face. Its iced breath stung his eyes. But it also snatched hold of the faces before him and revealed what was beneath.

As if in objection to this sudden epiphany, the wind picked up again and the song of the scotch grew louder, a sickly-sweet melodic tune that made him want to pick up the bottle and drink again.
Read more ›
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Format: Paperback
I gave this book 4 stars, but my true rating would be a 3.5. The story is interesting enough, but the layout of it made it really difficult for me to stay interested. There's 2 stories being told that converge to meet at a mutual point. Normally, I like that setup, but not this time. One of the stories just drags on and on in the middle of the book. I had a hard time finishing for that reason. Every time I'd get back into reading it, expecting to see more of the second character's arc, it never seemed to happen. It indeed does, but not until you're about 75% through the book. I feel like if you reduced this book by a third, I'd have loved it. The story itself is very clever. The ending felt a bit rushed, but it was satisfying overall. I was provided a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review.
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