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A Collection

December 1, 2006 | Format: MP3

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Song Title
Time
Popularity Prime  
30
1
2:42
30
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1:26
30
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2:19
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1:49
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3:15
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2:52
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4:25
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2:43
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4:51
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1:17
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1:57
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4:56
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3:54
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2:23
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5:33
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4:13
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3:36
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3:11
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2:59
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10:44
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3:55
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1:18

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Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 1999
  • Label: Topic
  • Copyright: 1999 Topic
  • Total Length: 1:16:18
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QZRGRE
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #37,163 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

5.0 out of 5 stars
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15
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See all 15 customer reviews
Lovely - I'm so glad it was released.
Erin
Anne Briggs sings the old, great folksongs of Britain in a timeless, clear and wrenching voice.
Ralph H. Peters
If you have only a handful of folk music albums, this should be one of them.
Jon Corelis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Ralph H. Peters on May 26, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This is a dark, beautiful album from a magnificent singer little known in the USA, and too little known even in her UK home. Anne Briggs sings the old, great folksongs of Britain in a timeless, clear and wrenching voice. This is a "folksinger" who was truly one of the folk, not a product of a scene, or of the glitzy world of the recording industry. Rather, Anne Briggs "lived the blues" the way Robert Johnson or Son House did--not that the sound is remotely the same, for there are no flatted sevenths here, but the on-the-edge life, the love of music for its own sake, and the voice etched by physical as well as emotional hardship make this the ultimate "white soul" album. The songs are those of the English countryside and Scottish lowlands, performed as simply and truly as possible, but the spirit is of all mankind. Few albums are indispensible, but, if you have loved the "daughters of Anne Briggs," such as Sandy Denny or Kate Rusby, you will treasure this wonderful set of recordings. For heart-bangers, not head-bangers.
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29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth A. Genco on April 18, 2003
Format: Audio CD
If you're a fan of contemporary British folk and "folk rock", you might want to take a little time to get to know Anne Briggs, if you haven't already. Not only will you be treated to a voice as pure and breathtakingly beautiful as can be imagined (and you can't, really -- Anne is to be heard to be believed), but you'll get a little history, too.
It's no secret that Anne singlehandedly changed the face of the British folksinging tradition. Sandy Denny, Maddy Prior, June Tabor, as well as more contemporary female voices such as that of Susan McKeown -- all of them hearken back to Anne. This collection is a solid compendium of Anne's criminally few recordings (she retired at the age of 27 because of her dislike for her recorded voice, and hasn't publically sung since). Almost all of the songs are traditional, and make for a nice introduction to some of the British folk standard repertoire (though I'd be willing to bet that some of these songs made it into the cannon by virtue of Anne's performances!). In addition to the songs, this edition's got great liner notes with some great stories about the musical life of Anne and some of her contemporaries -- all of them folks who made extensive contributions to the British folk revival.
An absolute must for all interested in the British singing tradition!
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By L. Unterkofler on February 19, 2007
Format: Audio CD
i recently discovered anne briggs via a recommendation on amazon and am so glad i did. her voice is perfection. it is such an honest representation of the music that moved her so and defined her career. though i wish in many ways she had produced more, it seems so fitting that she would shun fortune and fame and live a simple, earthbound existence. this is a gem.
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18 of 23 people found the following review helpful By eurydike on March 7, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Anne is the girl who tricked the Queen of Faeries and rescued Tambling, and the same who wandered off with Reynardine into the fogs that mask the face of true lands of milkwhite steeds, unpolluted by cellphones. She rides on the West Wind and bemoans the East Wind, while the North Wind courts her, and the Great South aches with white flowers garlanded about her dark tresses. I would give seven pots of gold for a time machine, and I would travel back to the Cambridge Folk Festival in '65, and wander traipsing among the daisies with fair Anne, and chase the swallows as they play among the haywains of an ancient summer.

She has swum with the Salmon of Wisdom.

It doesn't get any better than this.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Erin on July 2, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This is how I like to hear the old, traditional songs sung.
Simple and unadorned as they were sung in homes and
at gatherings long ago. Haunting stories about real life
that bring us close to times past.
Lovely - I'm so glad it was released. If you like this you may
like Kathy & Carol. Two old souls from across the pond,
who sang in the same haunting, and pure way as Anne Briggs.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By John L Murphy TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 5, 2006
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
This is like immersion in cold water-- once you get used to the bracing difference from normal sensation, you do not want to leave. Briggs' soprano is pure, free of much ornamentation but for this all the more controlled and focused. Briggs allows the song to guide her, and while she directs its interpretation by careful phrasing and pitch, she does not distract the listener from the narrative by any grandstanding. Briggs, in a Northern English/Scots style, understates her own transmittal of the tune. She points back, rather, to the tune.

If this makes sense, then you may like Briggs' self-effacing approach. This is not to make her sound mealy-mouthed or unable to make her presence felt, rather that Briggs steps aside, or gives the illusion of doing so, to let the song take the stage. No mean feat for a modern singer, like us all too aware of the celebrity and the poser who pretend to go back to revive an indigenous tradition in the name of roots or folk but really in the name of self-promotion and aggrandizement off of the public domain. If you have enjoyed Sweeney's Men, Andy Irvine, Planxty, or the numerous side projects of Irish trad in the 1970s onward, go back here to the origins of what became, slightly later in the 60s, the genesis of folk-rock. Even the Pogues, via a Sweeney partner Terry Woods of Moynihan, can attest to the far-ranging impact from two decades earlier of Briggs' arrival on the mid-60s scene. Here, partner Johnny Moynihan (who with another fellow Sweeney, Andy Irvine, brought into Ireland the bouzouki) gives subtle backing to a few tunes; these I would hold gain in resonance. I prefer the songs with a bit of instrumental enhancement, but these are few in the total heard here.
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