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A Culinary Voyage Through Germany Hardcover – April, 1997


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 224 pages
  • Publisher: Abbeville Press (April 1997)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0789203219
  • ISBN-13: 978-0789203212
  • Product Dimensions: 8.7 x 0.9 x 11.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,788,470 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

You are cordially invited to dinner with German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and his wife Hannelore. Dress is casual, but the food promises to be divine. In A Culinary Voyage Through Germany the Kohls act as hosts for a remarkable food tour of their homeland, from the Baltic Coast to the Alps and to the banks of the Lower Rhine. The book is divided into nine geographic regions, and each chapter begins with an introduction by Chancellor Kohl in which he shares his knowledge of German history and his personal experiences of each place, from eating Friesan waffles in Hamburg to his parents' first meeting at a wine festival in Paletinate. Hannelore Kohl, an accomplished amateur cook, then takes over with the help of award- winning chef Alfons Schuhbeck to introduce the reader to the culinary specialties of the area. Berlin Veal Roast, Frankfurt Green Sauce, Paderborn Carrot Salad, and Nürnberg Blade Roast are just a few of the regional delicacies the Kohls serve up--complete with mouthwatering photographs and detailed recipes. This is one dinner date you won't want to miss.

From Booklist

The wife of Germany's popular chancellor leads readers across the landscape of contemporary Germany to show off the current state of German cuisine. Region by region, she presents the best of German home cooking. As expected, meat dishes and hearty butter and cream sauces predominate, but German cooks today, as elsewhere, are using many more herbs and fresh vegetables to lighten dishes and to add unaccustomed variety to the table. Kohl assiduously avoids cliche: there's no recipe whatever for sauerbraten, for instance. Contemporary German cooking has borrowed from neighboring traditions to create new dishes such as Swabian ravioli stuffed with veal and spinach. Kohl rightly cites the significance of cheese in the German diet, for breakfast, a snack, or dinner. Not all recipes and instructions translate successfully, so adaptation may be necessary. Mark Knoblauch

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By lnoll on March 14, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Great book!! I have over 30 German cookbooks and this is absolutely the finest!! Not only does it include the best and most popular German fare but also information on the folklore and customs of this beautiful country. The book also features lavish full color photos of almost every dish. Don't miss out on this one!!!!
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Esther Schindler TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 23, 2005
Format: Hardcover
There are a lot of things I like about this cookbook. Unlike a lot of "American" German cooking, the recipes represent regions outside Bavaria. Hannelore Kohl (who, yes, is the wife of the ex-chancellor) divides the book into 9 regions, and presents typical recipes you'd find in each one. About half the recipes are accompanied with a photo of the finished dish, which can be somewhat inspiring. ("Yum, that looks good! Maybe I'll make this Winemaker's beef stew tonight!")

The recipes themselves are of mixed value. Several are excellent. Since we bought this cookbook about five years ago, her recipe for pork goulash with beer and mustard-pickles has become one of our standbys. The Harz potato salad with jagdwurst (smoked ham sausage) makes it worthwhile to search for the ingredients. (Fortunately, I have a good German deli nearby.) The Frankfurt Green Sauce (essentially herbs and sour cream served over hard boiled eggs or boiled potatoes) is really delicious, and one of the simplest versions I've found for this recipe.

And, if you're hankering for a huge collection of meat-and-potatoes recipes -- heavy on the meat! -- you need look no further. There's little here for a vegetarian. Not much for chicken and fish, either, though there are a few moments for goose and duck fans. Helmut Kohl must like his pork and beef.

A few recipes are less successful. I made her pork roast stuffed with onions; it called for 6 onions. I managed to pry 2 sliced onions into the cavity, and had 4 left over. (Oh well, it's not like onions will go to waste around here.) The meal tasted great, but I do like to think I can rely on the instructions.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By monroe on July 31, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I own a lot of German cook books. This one has the advantage that it covers all regions. It also has some very nice descriptions of the different areas und good pictures. I grew up in Germany and I do not remember that we ate so much meat. But I liked it because it gave me all the English translations and it contains every major dish, dessert and cake eaten in Germany. It would have been nice to add an index with the German names, as I had no idea of the English names.

If you ever want to try some German food beside Bavarian dishes, this is a very helpful book. There are recipes for Pumpernickel Puddings, Leek tarts, blushing virgins and beer soups

Enjoy
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful By rodboomboom HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on February 1, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Former chancellor's wife Hannelore Kohl with able assistance from her husband and Chef Schuhbeck guide us through Germany region by region.
Spectacular in its photography and intros to each region, they then share some of the local specialty dishes of each with great flair and color.
Lots of good basic dishes here with some exotic, more complex as well. Technique and availability of ingredients should be no barrier to even the average home cook.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Hannelore and Helmut Kohl have put together the most enticing and instructive cookbook on German cuisine that I have seen. About twenty pages in, I was struck by how similar my reaction to this food was to learning about 'real' Italian food. German cuisine can be both lighter and more imaginative than I realized from eating in German-American restaurants. Mrs. Kohl is the wife of former German Chancellor Helmut Kohl and she worked with master chef Alfons Schuhbeck to put together traditionally-based recipes from each of Germany's political regions as a money-raising project for her foundation, which supports research into rehabilitation of brain-damaged people. Culinary regions explored include the Baltic coast, the Saxon Alps and Thuringian Forest, the Lower Rhine Valley, the area bounded by the Rhine, Moselle and Saar Rivers, the Main River Valley and Franconia. Recipes are clear as to ingredients and do not require many specialized ingredients (a few require specialty meat ingredients.) Each recipe is accompanied by beautiful and enticing photographs of the plated dish and suggested accompaniments. Dishes that might sound 'heavy' in their name look very digestible on the plate. Of course, there are plenty of meat dishes: pork, beef, lamb, duck, goose and so on. I was struck by how often Germans use fresh or dried fruit in these meat braises and by how often bulb fennel is used. There is a wonderful light fish soup based on poached flounder and baby shrimp seasoned with fresh lemon juice. There is a recipe for a light fresh pea soup, lifted in flavor with a bit of minced bacon. Other vegetable-based soups appear with each region.Read more ›
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