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A.D.D.: Adolescent Demo Division Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Series: A.D.D.: Adolescent Demo Division
  • Hardcover: 152 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (January 31, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401223559
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401223557
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 14.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 2.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,049,686 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Smart, exciting, and timely, A.D.D. is one part prophecy, one part critique, and one part action story, a heady mix." —Cory Doctorow

“ADD’s laser-guided smart missile zeroes in on the black undercurrents of gaming culture, celebrity and the pharmaceutical industry to target the secret wars being waged behind our monitor screens. In a world defined by ubiquitous media, best-selling wargames, autistic disorders and the commodification and exploitation of youth, Doug Rushkoff and artist Goran Sudzuka vivisect the zeitgeist with a sleek tale of tomorrow’s children, that’s part social sci-fi and part “X-Men” for the PlayStation generation.”—Grant Morrison

About the Author

Winner of the first Neil Postman award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity, Douglas Rushkoff has written a dozen best-selling books on media and society, including Cyberia, Ecstasy Club, Media Virus, Coercion (winner of the Marshall McLuhan Award), Get Back in the Box, and Life Inc. He has written and produced the PBS Frontline documentaries Digital Nation, The Persuaders, and Merchants of Cool. A columnist for The Daily Beast and Arthur Magazine, his articles have been regularly published in The New York Times and Discover, among many other publications. His radio commentaries air on NPR and WFMU, his opeds appear in The New York Times, and he is a familiar face on television, from ABC News to The Colbert Report. Rushkoff has taught at New York University and the New School, played keyboards for the industrial band PsychicTV, directed for theater and film, and worked as a stage fight choreographer.

More About the Author

Winner of the first Neil Postman award for Career Achievement in Public Intellectual Activity, Douglas Rushkoff is an author, teacher, and documentarian who focuses on the ways people, cultures, and institutions create, share, and influence each other's values. He sees "media" as the landscape where this interaction takes place, and "literacy" as the ability to participate consciously in it.

His ten best-selling books on new media and popular culture have been translated to over thirty languages. They include Cyberia, Media Virus, Playing the Future, Nothing Sacred: The Truth about Judaism, and Coercion, winner of the Marshall Mcluhan Award for best media book. Rushkoff also wrote the acclaimed novels Ecstasy Club and Exit Strategy and graphic novel, Club Zero-G. He has just finished a book for HarperBusiness, applying renaissance principles to today's complex economic landscape, Get Back in the Box: Innovation from the Inside Out. He's now writing a monthly comic book for Vertigo called Testament.

He has written and hosted two award-winning Frontline documentaries - The Merchants of Cool looked at the influence of corporations on youth culture, and The Persuaders, about the cluttered landscape of marketing, and new efforts to overcome consumer resistance.

Rushkoff's commentaries air on CBS Sunday Morning and NPR's All Things Considered, and have appeared in publications from The New York Times to Time magazine. He wrote the first syndicated column on cyberculture for The New York Times and Guardian of London, as well as a column on wireless for The Feature and a new column for the music and culture magazine, Arthur.

Rushkoff founded the Narrative Lab at NYU's Interactive Telecommunications Program, and lectures about media, art, society, and change at conferences and universities around the world.

He is Advisor to the United Nations Commission on World Culture, on the Board of Directors of the Media Ecology Association, The Center for Cognitive Liberty and Ethics, and as a founding member of Technorealism. He has been awarded Senior Fellowships by the Markle Foundation and the Center for Global Communications Fellow of the International University of Japan.

He regularly appears on TV shows from NBC Nightly News to Larry King and Bill Maher. He is writing a new monthly comic book for Vertigo, and developed the Electronic Oracle software series for HarperCollins Interactive.

Rushkoff is on the board of several new media non-profits and companies, and regularly consults on new media arts and ethics to museums, governments, synagogues, churches, and universities, as well as Sony, TCI, advertising agencies, and other Fortune 500 companies.

Rushkoff graduated magna cum laude from Princeton University, received an MFA in Directing from California Institute of the Arts, a post-graduate fellowship (MFA) from The American Film Institute, and a Director's Grant from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences. He has worked as a certified stage fight choreographer, and as keyboardist for the industrial band PsychicTV.

He lives in Park Slope Brooklyn with his wife, Barbara, and daughter Mamie.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Rachel Anne Calabia on May 10, 2012
Format: Hardcover
This ambitious graphic novel depicts a world where a special brand of teenagers are pampered and feted to do one thing: play video games. They appear on a popular reality show and get to test the latest technology. They are a tightly controlled group whose every move is monitored by Next Gen Inc. Sheltered from the real world, they are the superstar guinea pigs of media conglomerates and the idols of other kids.

Yet nothing is quite what it seems. When Lionel, one of the teen gamers, witnesses a death he thinks is real, he begins to question everything he knows. With fellow gamers Takei and Kasinda, Lionel embarks on a journey to find the truth about the A.D.D.

"A.D.D." is a slick production with beautiful artwork and coloring, yet the overall effect is somewhat lacking. The ending feels rushed, as if some pages of the story were mistakenly edited out during production. Somehow, I feel the author has much more to say but didn't have the space to expand his complex ideas. It's a pity, because a lot of effort went into the creation of the world that has its own unique slang and technology.

It is almost certain that "A.D.D." will be popular among hardcore gamers and readers who can't get enough of works reminiscent of "Ender's Game." Personally, I am now more interested in reading the author's theories on autism and mass media than any possible sequels.

(This review originally appeared in the San Francisco/Sacramento Book Reviews.)
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1 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Dr. B. Iverson on April 1, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I liked the concept idea for the book. The drawings were okay, but the story just didn't make sense. I am over 60, so I asked some of my college students to read it and tell me what they thought, and their reviews were similar.
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