Customer Reviews

57
4.4 out of 5 stars
A Dangerous Man: A Novel
Format: PaperbackChange
Price:$11.05 + Free shipping with Amazon Prime
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

Format: Paperback
Henry (Hank) Thompson from Huston's sensational debut novel Caught Stealing returns in this even more violent, final volume of this rollercoaster thrill ride of a series that will have you saying a definite no, next time someone asks you to mind their cat. If you have not yet started reading this book and haven't actually read Caught Stealing you should put this novel aside, find a copy of Caught Stealing, also grab the second novel Six Bad Things: A Novel while your at and start reading where this great journey in order. A Dangerous Man gives away substantial chunks of both those former novel's plots. You will still be able to read this as a standalone but believe me you're going to want to enjoy the thrill ride of the first masterpiece and its sequel to their full extend and you certainly can't do so when you know what's going to happen!

If you were reading A Dangerous Man as a standalone it would be understandable as you read the initial Las Vegas chapters of this book that you feel no empathy for Henry at all and think he is a bit of a loser as drug addicted, he constantly contemplates ending it all with a shard of glass from his broken mirror, the mirror in the state it is as he doesn't want to have to look at the reconstructed face of the man he has become. Hank's life consists of putting bullets into the back of the heads of those who have gotten on the wrong side of his Russian keeper David Dolokhov after those victims are beaten unconscious by Branko, his minder. The only thing that keeps Hank from doing so is the knowledge that his parents will be killed the second he stops being useful. However a new assignment for Henry, baby sitting a new baseball prodigy who will dub him Scarface, will awaken Henry from his slumber and end the madness once and for all!

As a standalone A dangerous Man wraps up the series very realistically, although the action and thrill ride isn't as great as the initial Caught Stealing and slightly less than Six bad Things, but if you've read the first two, you've got to read this!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on November 3, 2007
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
** WARNING TO PROSPECTIVE READERS **
* THIS IS THE THIRD BOOK IN THE "HANK THOMPSON" TRILOGY *
* TO FULLY APPRECIATE THIS STORY IT IS RECOMMENDED THAT *
* YOU READ THE TWO PRIOR BOOKS: *
* "CAUGHT STEALING"** & "SIX BAD THINGS" *
* BOTH OF WHICH I HAVE PREVIOUSLY REVIEWED *

If you've made it through the wild and wooly life of Charlie Huston's Hank Thompson, by reading the first two books of this trilogy, you certainly know by now, that for a guy who was at peace with the world until he agreed to watch a neighbor's cat, that no matter how good or innocent Hank's intentions are, that dead bodies and drugs are sure to follow.

Like Al Pacino, in the ongoing "Godfather" sequels, "Every time Hank tries to get out of the murder business, someone drags him back in!" The constant threat by undesirables to kill his parents, leads Hank to be a "hit-man" and "limb-breaker" for Russian mobster David Dolokhov. In addition to losing one of his kidney's in an earlier book, and assorted broken ribs, multiple concussions, multiple gun shot wounds, gashes, gouges, and more stitches than a garment made by an epileptic seamstress, Hank also gets plastic surgery to hide his identity from all the authorities and civilians looking for a payoff with his capture. The fact that the Russian mobster arranges for the plastic surgery to be performed by an individual not accredited to perform such surgery, leaves Hank with a deformed face riveted with scars and discoloration.

The latest job assigned to Hank by the Russian is be a bodyguard and driver for Miguel Arenas, college baseball star, Olympic Gold Medal winner, and now the overall number one draft choice in the Major Leagues by the New York Mets. In addition to Miguel's ability to hit the ball out of the park, comes the ability to have a gambling "Jones" that causes him to lose million's of dollars of his signing bonus, which puts him into heavy debt, to who else, but the Russian mobster. Hank and Miguel forge a special bond, which brings Hank back to where his misery and murders began, New York city. Blood starts spurting, bodies start dying, bones start breaking, as Hank runs, hides, fights, shoots, stabs, and pleads for his life. This is a must read for every Charlie Huston fan!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on April 22, 2007
Format: Paperback
Charlie Huston is one mean guy. He puts his main character, Hank Thompson, through about as many bad things as one person can endure, and then some, in Caught Stealing, ratcheted up the pain in Six Bad Things, and then makes it pretty much unbearable in this latest entry, A Dangerous Man.

If you haven't read the first two books, then this third one won't make a lot of sense. Hank is a would-have-been-great high school baseball prospect who gets hurt before he even gets to the minors, kills his best friend in a drunk driving accident, and then wanders to New York City with a girl who promptly dumps him there. A decade later, he's tending bar part time, living in a crappy apartment, and he gets caught up, through no fault of his own, in the chase for a large amount of money which several different criminals claim as theirs. Most of the rest of the three books involve Hank finding it, trying to hide it (and himself), losing it, and then finding it again.

This third entry has Hank working as a hit man and enforcer for a Russian mobster who is one of the people who claim the money. As long as Hank can't come up with the money, he has to kill people for David or someone will be sent to kill Hank's parents. Hank's pretty good at killing, but he's so hopped up on drugs that his usefulness is beginning to wane. As the books starts, David wants Hank to watch a "friend" of his, a baseball player who has a gambling problem and a bit of difficulty with impulse control.

These are very good novels at some levels. The author seems to know the locales well. He seems to know the seamy side of Las Vegas and New York City pretty well, and he seems to have a good grasp of character. I enjoyed this novel, and look forward to the vampire private eye series, which seems rather interesting.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
When Hank Thompson was in High School he was the boy wonder of baseball. But like many a prospect, he got damaged and would never play again. Because of this Henry ended up involved first in a robbery of a Russian Mafia Don (he didn't do the robbing), a flight to Mexico, a murder in Mexico, a flight to the US and a reconciliation (of sorts) with the Russian mobster.

It's two years later and Hank is working as a 'cleaner' for the mob. He breaks bones and kills those who need to 'learn a lesson'. He's fighting the pain of a botched plastic surgery, addicted to more pills than he can count and his waist has grown from 34 to 40. He is not a happy camper (but as long as he does his job, his parents are safe).

The Don wants him to keep an eye on a baseball prospect (gee that sounds familiar) for one night in Vegas. Thus begins a whirlwind of events that will bring this trilogy to a end. In between the visit to Vegas and an anti-denouement (did you expect any other) our boy goes through hell and hell, a gigantic murder spree and finally the curtain comes down on everything.

This is the kind of story that could have turned out to be very 'canned' and unsatisfactory for writer and reader, but Huston has done a fine job in sidestepping as man cliches as possible though leaving in enough to have the pathos of the characters come through. Great job.

Zeb Kantrowitz
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on March 28, 2007
Format: Paperback
Taken together, "Caught Stealing," Six Bad Things," and "Dangerous Man" are brilliant. They belong on the library shelf with "Borstal Boy," "Lost Souls" and "Crime and Punishment" and other classic examinations of outlaw lives. These three books resonate especially strongly now, when we are so aware of how circumstances can strong-arm even the unwilling into enslavement to violence and destruction -- child soldiers, suicide bombers, even gang members, victims of hurt and destruction in every part of the world who can only stand the violence by deadening themselves to it and have no hope of an end to it until their own lives end. People like me have virtually no framework for comprehending what such lives are like. These books show what it is like for one inhabitant of such a life.

One of the best things about these books is that they achieve a moral vision while staying within the noir formula. They are like good sonnets -- all the better for their adherence to a strict formula. Huston's writing is beautiful too. After I finished reading the last one, I heard the song "500 miles" done by the Seldom Scene, which I love. I have never heard that song quite the same way I heard it then. Quite an achievement, to illuminate that song and so many others about lost souls.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on July 14, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
The final installment in a three book series finds Hank yet again on a downward spiral of broken bones, concussions and bruises. Hank has finally become what he feared the most at the beginning of the series. He is, "A dangerous man".

The theme of this series might was well be "everyone dies. badly.", and that is especially true as the story wraps up.

I see that the author describes his work as "pulp" rather than noir. These books are fine examples of the pulp genre, and that explains why he doesn't choose to explore the darker emotional conflicts that can be evident in noir.

Looking back, I think the first book was the best. It was pure pulp action. The second book has that "middle" feel that seems to always occur in trilogies. I think that final book does choose to explore the dark emotional side of things much more, but doesn't do it very well.

The series is marred by long diversions which don't help the story move along. The second book dedicated far too much time to pointless football talk, and the third book dedicated just as much time to pointless extended descriptions of nightmares.

Still, these books are a great read, and highly recommended.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on January 30, 2009
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
A great ending to a superb trilogy!

Henry "Hank" Thompson is back, his plastic surgery enhanced face, his pill habit and more...

The story starts in Vegas and then heads back to New York, Hank is working as a "dangerous man", a hired killer, enforcer, bodyguard, etc.

The Russian mobster David Dolokhov has Hank on a short leash, with the threat of his parents being killed hanging over his head, Hank doesn't really have a choice!

I enjoyed this book just as much as the 1st & 2nd books. Charlie's writing and great characters always make for a fast and exciting read!

Hank has killed seventeen people through the three books, stolen four million dollars from the Russian mob and is wanted by the FBI, it had to end sometime!

Charlie Huston could have went alot of different ways for the ending, I think he chose the most realistic ending possible, without overdoing it!

Charlie Huston is a great writer, I'm looking forward to reading his other books, "The Shotgun Rule", "The Mystic Art of Erasing All Signs of Death" & "Already Dead"!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
Format: Paperback
A fitting close to the Henry Thompson triology. If you hadn't read, the first, "Caught Stealing", or the second, "Six Bad Things" it wouln't matter as each is a stand alone novel. Still the effect of a 1,2,3 punch is better. A wrong guy caught up in a Hithcock plot of ganster violence is simply dead on. The writing is Chandler caliber, with this concluding novel, some "Pulp Fiction" spliced future action sequences, being brought up to speed at the chapters conclusions. Its a no way out: no best case scenario plot. Deal yourself in!
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
on March 24, 2009
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
This trilogy is NOT my usual reading and I only got the books for my Kindle because they were free last month. But I got hooked on Hank. This final book didn't disappoint. I like the way Charlie writes because he makes me laugh. Even though not many of us can relate on a personal level to Henry's bazaar story, haven't we all at some time had disjointed thought processes like his...almost a running commentary with himself. Any book that puts a smile on my face in spite of the violence, is a winner.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 3, 2010
Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase
The first two books in the series were dynamite. The last book however, is seriously lacking the punch that made Hank Thompson so memorable. Hank spends most of the book either addicted to or reminiscing about pills, everyone whose died helping him, and baby sitting a hot shot baseball prospect. Oh and killing. There's some killing here too and it is a little gratuitous.

Not a bad book but not worth $10.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Caught Stealing: A Novel
Caught Stealing: A Novel by Charlie Huston (Paperback - May 31, 2005)
$11.16

Six Bad Things: A Novel
Six Bad Things: A Novel by Charlie Huston (Paperback - June 28, 2005)
$12.01

The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death: A Novel
The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death: A Novel by Charlie Huston (Paperback - December 29, 2009)
$10.98
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.