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A Fighting Man Of Mars Hardcover – June 13, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 252 pages
  • Publisher: Kessinger Publishing, LLC (June 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 143668692X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1436686921
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (38 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,750,122 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Edgar Rice Burroughs fame stems from the creation of Tarzan and the Barsoom science fiction series. He was born on September 1, 1875 in Chicago, Illinois, and entered military service in 1895. Two years later, he was diagnosed with a heart problem and was discharged. He drifted from job to job and in 1911, he found work selling pencil sharpeners. Because he had plenty of free time during this period, he started reading pulp fiction magazines. He thought that if people were getting paid for writing such rot, then he could write stories which were just as rotten. After seven years of being paid low wages he began writing his own fiction. The first Tarzan and John Carter stories were published in 1912. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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I read this in high school.
Peace Village
He is good at pulling you into the places he goes.
terry
Lots of fun action and adventure to read about.
Chrisbuyer

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Lovitt HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on June 14, 2003
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is one of the first science fiction/fantasy books I ever read and I couldn't bear to see it languish without a review. My copy (which originally belonged to my father) dates from 1931 and its story was originally published in six parts in the "Blue Book Magazine" from May to September 1930. It is wonderful to see these books reissued, as they are the progenitors of many, if not all of the heroic fantasy serials that take up so much room on modern bookshelves. Edgar Rice Burroughs (ERB) was the first and also (in my opinion) the best writer of multi-volume fantasies.
'Fighting Man' is the seventh book in ERB's Mars series and differs from most volumes in the series in that John Carter, gentleman of Virginia and Warlord of Barsoom (Mars) is only a peripheral figure.

The adventure is narrated in the first person by Hadron of Hastor, a warrior in the service of John Carter. Hadron's family is rich in honor but not in material possessions and when he falls in love with the wealthy Sanoma Tora, she snubs him. For months, the soldierly Hadron haunts the palace of Tor Hatan, Sanoma Tora's father, but his hope of winning her are vanishingly small until she is abducted one night by a mysterious flier.
The strange ship is armed with a weapon that disintegrates the metal of a pursuing flier, and the Warlord realizes that there is now a new weapon of mass destruction let loose upon the dying seas of Barsoom (it's hard not to adopt ERB's style after reading one of his books).
Hadron is promised Sanoma Tora's hand if he can rescue her. The Warlord dispatches the doughty warrior in search of his love, and asks him to keep an eye peeled for the new metal-disintegrator weapon.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By E. M. Van Court VINE VOICE on December 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
Sanoma Tora, beautiful daughter of a rich and powerful leader on Barsoom has been kidnapped! Noone knows by who or why, but the poor but courageous Hadron of Hastur (who has been paying court to her) volunteers to charge off to her rescue. Never mind that Sanoma Tora is a spoiled little gold-digger who has snubbed our hero at every turn, making it clear that he is neither rich nor influential enough to get into *her* bed...

Guided by his passion for Sanoma Tora, he sallies forth to rescue her. In the process, he kills bad guys, rescues the innocent, enlists the aid of allies, becomes the hero to a poor escaped slave girl, and saves the entire fleet of Helium (the nation of John Carter, Warlord of Mars) from certain doom.

Romance figures large in this one, with unrequitted love, by and for Hadron being the essential themes of this book.

Needless to say, Hadron acts with honor, comes to his senses about the pampered princess/spoiled, self-serving brat (pick one or more), fights heroically, outwits his enemies, saves the day, and finds a more worthy love. All of the above is obvious, but getting there is a first rate ride.

Another tale of Barsoom, another winner, and another reason to read the next one.

E. M. Van Court
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By D. Blankenship HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on March 14, 2005
Format: Mass Market Paperback
From the first page you will be hooked. This particular book was first published in installments around 1930, as was the custom with pulp fiction at that time. The series was more or less reintroduced during the early 1960s (that is when I started reading them) and has been around ever since. For a work to last that long indeed says something. I have to agree with the reviewer (Mr. Wallace) in that this is one of the better works of the series. Each page if filled with wonderful improbable action and the villians are endless. While John Carter is indeed a part of the story, the main character is one of his top warriors, Hadron of Hastor. Plenty of Damsel in Distress stuff here, and all good clean fun. If you have never read the series, suggest you do. If you have "out grown" the series, suggest revert back to the little boy or girl lurking deep within you and let him or her out. You won't be sorry. Recommend this one highly.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Michael Martinez on December 15, 2000
Format: Paperback
A Fighting Man of Mars tells the story of Tan Hadron, a soldier of Helium who takes on the vicious Tul Axtar, a cowardly but power-mad Jeddak who has assembled the largest army Barsoom has ever seen. Caught between them is the beautiful but pretentious Sonoma Tora. Hadron finds a better companion in the brave and daring Tavia, an escaped slave girl who will do whatever it takes to avoid going back to the life she once knew.
One of the great things about this book is the fact that Burroughs believes strongly in character growth. But he also pioneered the strong female character in the adventure story format. There are always damsels in distress, but as the Barsoom series progresses the women become more active and determinate, equals or near-equals with the men. What is most astonishing is that Burroughs achieves this compelling parity without destroying the social fabric to which he introduced the reader in the earlier Barsoom novels.
All Barsoom hangs in the balance as Tul Axtar's plan for world conquest nears completion. And Axtar must act quickly as it requires immense resources to feed so many hungry warriors. The alternative is nearly unthinkable.
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