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A Grey Moon Over China Hardcover – May 12, 2009


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Books; First Edition edition (May 12, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0765321424
  • ISBN-13: 978-0765321428
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.5 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,102,280 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

First published in 2006 by Black Heron Press, Day's intense debut opens in the year 2027 with the world on the verge of economic and environmental collapse as nations wage war over a rapidly diminishing oil supply. Army engineer Eduardo Torres accidentally discovers plans for a quantum battery, which could solve Earth's energy crisis. Instead of sharing it, Torres sets up his own rogue state, builds a fleet of starships and takes them through a wormhole to the Holzstein System, only to be attacked first by other humans and then by what appear to be aliens determined to destroy humankind. Though marred by a few technological improbabilities, this well-written, decidedly grim novel is replete with strong, thorny characters, fast-paced action sequences and rich descriptions of human folly and true heroism. (May)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

Review

"Inventive, disturbing, intriguingly populated, and utterly fascinating: an altogether remarkable debut."--Kirkus Reviews (starred review) on A Grey Moon Over China

"A Grey Moon Over China paints an engrossing high-tech-decaying-into-low-tech future, with lots of Machiavellian intrigue and a fascinating struggle by humans to understand their machines."--Entertainment Weekly

"[Presents] a grimly optimistic picture of the future while telling the personal stories of his characters as they struggle to make their way in an uncertain world."--Library Journal on A Grey Moon Over China
 
"This well-written, decidedly grim novel is replete with strong, thorny characters, fast-paced action sequences, and rich descriptions of human folly and true heroism."--Publishers Weekly on A Grey Moon Over China

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Customer Reviews

And one that just doesn't make sense at all.
Spoon
The trouble started to occur and the book revealed more and more characters and further plot developments with less and less attention paid to fleshing anything out.
W. D Swingley
Day's next book will tell us if he can craft the background as well as he can create an amazing set of events without context.
David E. Nelson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By W. D Swingley on February 16, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I'm typically not one to write a review, but this book rose above the rest (not in a good way) to warrant a quick review.

A Grey Moon Over China, by Thomas A. Day, had me very excited from both the back cover blurb and the opening few chapters. Mr. Day writes in a very fast paced style that really drew me in... again, at first. The trouble started to occur and the book revealed more and more characters and further plot developments with less and less attention paid to fleshing anything out. While this didn't necessarily confuse me, it did disconnect me from the entirety of events as they occurred in rapid-fire succession over the course of many perspective years.

The book's interesting plot continues to entice as the plot unfolds, however it fails to deliver on any but the most superficial sense. I got the impression that Mr. Day ground a 500,000 word manuscript down to its current size, leaving out fluff such as character development and scene description. I gave up on the book when, around 2/3 of the way in, the main character's own unsurpassed genius (despite his continual relegation as ambassador schmuck) susses out obscure pseudo-scientific details known only to the author. I won't spoil it for anyone who might enjoy Mr. Day's style.

In the end, I would best describe this book as frustrating. Just like a wonderful movie concept spoiled at the hands of an awful director, I believe A Grey Moon Over China is an intriguing plot spoiled by the author.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nezi on February 19, 2008
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I would argue that this book is not just Sci-Fi, but literature, in the classic sense. It tells a hard story in a heart-breaking way. A flawed hero's journey, away from, and back to, the broken self. It also looks at the fallout of what appears to be the pursuit of a dream, but is really just a flight from one's origins. It is not an easy read as Day just dumps you in the middle of a new world and does not explain much of the technology. Neither is it filled with joy. Killing, adults, children, and animals, in pursuit of a military goal, are all fair game here, as it is in real life. If you like the grim re-imagining of Battlestar Galactica, you will be on solid ground here. Hope does inhabit this book, but only of the ragged sort where a weed springs up between two desolate rocks.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By C. ANZIULEWICZ on February 27, 2010
Format: Hardcover
"Grey Moon Over China" is quintessential space opera, so if you're dismayed at how sci-fi bookshelves are becoming increasingly dominated by fantasy and "alternate history," this isn't a bad choice. It's also a fairly ambitious debut for new author Thomas A. Day. The story isn't bad, though it seems just a tad derivitive: A group of humans stumble across promising technology which allows them to lead an exodus from a near-future Earth that's slowly falling apart ... only to be confronted by machines they have created to chart the way, machines that have since evolved and rebelled. Sound familiar? The story is pretty grim at times, not that I have a problem with that; I've slogged through worse. What bothered me most about this book was the narrative, which I found pretty choppy and unfocused and occasionally confusing. I found myself skimming over a lot of it, and I am normally a very deliberate reader.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Spoon on January 9, 2011
Format: Mass Market Paperback Verified Purchase
Earth in the 2020's, energy problems, political problems, food problems, and a group of people who want to get away from it all through a space portal . Good and interesting concepts, long and convoluted execution. Figured out who the "bad guys" would be (had to be) early on in the book, but kept waiting for one of the "smart" characters to figure it out; that didn't happen 'til near the end. Plenty of characters to hate, few that are likeable. And one that just doesn't make sense at all. I kept thinking that the book would get to the point of tying the loose ends together, but it really only happened in an Agatha Christie/deux ex machina way. Disappointing.
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By Christina Paige on October 23, 2009
Format: Hardcover
This is a tough but ultimately very rewarding blend of dystopic vision, hard (technological) and soft (psychological) SF, apocalyptic quotations, and innovative ways for things to go wrong, wrong, wrong.
Mr. Day has an extraordinary background; according to his bioblurb he's been a night cargo pilot, a senior manager in aerospace industry, and a software developer for artificial intelligence. It takes at least three of his main characters to represent the range of his experiences. His writing style is a bit like Heinlein at his darkest (think Farnham's Freehold without the weird Freudian stuff); while his recourse to depth psychology is reminiscent of Ursula LeGuin. Not a bad combination.
The protagonist is Eduardo Torres, who in 2027 is an 18 year old warrant officer, conscripted at age 14 by what's left of the United States and trained in the Technical Warfare School for dirty ops. China is the dominant world power. Earth is a place of desertification, drought, famine, wars, and floods, and a population of 7 billion. During a sweep and seize mission on an island in the Pacific, Torres finds and steals an invention, a battery that can run for decades and power vehicles, planes, hospitals, computer systems - or starships. Torres wants out, bad. Trouble is, while a torus has been built in the vicinity of Venus that could theoretically propel a spaceship across light-years in hours, the project was left unfinished, owing to lack of just about every essential resource. So there's no exit torus, and no destination.
Torres (note the phonic similarity of Torres and torus) shares his find first with fellow Tech cadre, and then, carefully, with world powers in exchange for materials to build exploration drones, an exit torus, and other equipment. Mutual betrayal is the name of the game.
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