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A Hessian Diary of the American Revolution Paperback – March 15, 1993


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 300 pages
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; New edition edition (March 15, 1993)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806125306
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806125305
  • Product Dimensions: 5.2 x 0.6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #165,885 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Bruce E. Burgoyne, a graduate of Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, holds a master's degree from Trinity University in San Antonio, Texas. His military career was spent mostly in military intelligence, with service in the United States Navy, Army, and Air Force. Since retirement, he has spent many years researching the role of the Hessians in the American Revolution and has translated numerous Hessian diaries published by the Johannes Schwalm Association.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 10 customer reviews
This book is difficult to find in an original edition.
Charles Fegan
An excellent book, it provides a rare and personal insight into the American Revolution from the eyes of an enemy enlisted soldier.
LCDR W L Simpson Jr
I really felt like I knew Dohla in the end and found it a very valuable research tool.
"fusilier10"

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John Helmut Merz on December 2, 2002
This is a translation of a Diary of a Bayreuth soldier of the American Revolution written originally by Johann Conrad Doehla,
and translated into English by Bruce E, Burgoyne. This gives an
insight of the lifes of those German auxiliary soldiers who were hired by the British King George III to fight the American rebels. This man went through battles until the end at Yorktown,
became a prisoner, and noted down every days happenings. You'll
find the names of many deserting comrades who later served with
the Americans, and settled after the war in the new United States. This Diary in my opinion follows closely in quality the Diary written by the famous Baroness Friederike von Riedesel. In any event, anybody interested in the American Revolution history
will find this book most interesting.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 14, 2000
Great book to see what a soldier from the 'enemy' was experiencing. From the dull days ("Stood watch"), to days of battles and the deaths of commrades, it really gives a good insight as to the thoughts and daily rituals of someone who was there. An added bonus for me, living in New York, was the descriptions of the East Coast, from Virginia to Rhode Island, given by someone who stood here 225 years ago and marveled at America's bounty. I highly recommend this book to anyone who wants to see what the "other side" saw.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By "fusilier10" on June 26, 2000
When most people study the American Revolution they get only one side of the conflict. It is said that the victors of war write the history books and thus it sometimes is difficult to get a true picture of what really happened unless we weigh both sides in the conflict. Like Lt. Fredrick McKenzie's and Sgt. Roger Lamb's Diaries, this book gives the reader a view of the thoughts and experiences of the crown forces during the war. It is well written and Bruce Burgoyne does an excellent job crossreferencing other diaries as well. I really felt like I knew Dohla in the end and found it a very valuable research tool. I highly recommend this book to those interested in the history of both sides in the American Revolution and those interested in the contributions of the Hessian regiments.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By R. A Forczyk VINE VOICE on February 1, 2001
This book is an interesting diary by a private in the German Bayreuth regiment, who served in America during 1777-1781. Dohla was captured at Yorktown, imprisoned in Maryland and not repatriated until 1783. Particularly poignant are examples of how German officers maintained brutal discipline and this brutality undermined morale. The diary is filled with desertion after desertion. Relations between British and German troops appeared decent. There is only limited discussion of combat operations in this account because Dohla's unit usually seemed to miss most actions for one reason or another, but there is plenty of skirmishing. Dohla's comments on America are interesting from the point of view of the common soldier. Unfortunately, there are no maps.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Carol Kay on December 23, 2013
Verified Purchase
Another very interesting book about the War of Independence from the viewpoint of a Hessian soldier. I couldn't help noticing sometimes his rather comical descriptions of what he saw and happenings around him, for example a "Thanksgiving" feast in 1782 but ..... "he didn't know why". Apparently they didn't give thanks in Germany in those days. Also he was only wounded once, sick twice -- not bad since he made it through 5 years of battles and two in captivity. But only a Private after all of that?!
One thing I was perplexed about was after the battle of Yorktown, why did the British march all the troops so far inland all the way back to New York City instead of just sailing up the coast? They certainly had enough ships to carry them. Good reading.
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