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3.6 out of 5 stars
A Knight in Central Park
Format: Kindle EditionChange
Price:$2.99
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51 of 55 people found the following review helpful
on April 19, 2011
This was a funny and entertaining read. Joe (the Hero) is awesome, funny, quirky and cute. Even now I giggle remembering some of his (mis)adventures. The Heroine is Alexandra and I liked her (especially in the beginning of the book) but I felt that I would've liked to have gotten to know her better. I didn't find this book at all predictable (beside the basic expected HEA) and I really enjoyed the secondary characters, notably Garrett and Sebastiano. You have to give this book a chance, it's definitely worth it.

I purchased this book for .99 cents on my Kindle, great bargain, definitely worth more!
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on April 23, 2011
I saw this book title with a tagline next to it saying a must read for Outlander fans. First thing I must say is that the only thing that is comparable to this book and the Outlander series is that it involves a romance between two time travelers. But that is it. I read this book in a couple of days and it is an okay storyline. I wish it had had more depth when it came to dealing with the whole time travel aspect of it. This is why I had to write a review rebutting the comparison to Outlander. I read the Outlander series three times so far, that is how much I am a fan of Diana Gabaldon and that series. And I am pretty sure I can speak for a whole bunch of Outlander fans when I say that you simply cannot put this into the same category. That being said, this book, A Knight in Central Park, is not a bad read at all. I will admit I read it because I became fascinated with the whole aspect of a time travel romance because of the Outlander series. But I was left wanting so much more when it came to that aspect of this story. Other than that, as I said it is not a bad read and worth the small amount of money I spent reading it. I just would like to have seen more depth into the story.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on April 14, 2011
I got this book because of the cheap price and the 2 other reviews. I have read many romance novels. This author is amazing. It was a beautiful story. .99 was a mega bargain for this story. Read it you won't regret it!
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24 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on March 22, 2011
A Knight in Central Park was my first experience with Time Travel. This book was enchanting. I was caught. I couldn't put it down. Loved the ending...brought tears to my eyes.
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16 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on November 24, 2011
I tried to like it, I really did. I got through about the first 1/3 of the book and just couldn't go any further. I have three main issues with this story, and a lot of smaller ones. First and foremost is that they travel in time *AND* in space. I am sure that there is a plausible background on why this is, but the author does not provide it. At least with Michael Crichton's "Timeline" there is an explanation of this possibility. Second, the venomous snake that drops from the tree to attack the travelers... No such possibility in Great Britain! Only one species of venomous snake in G.B., and it's shy and rarely fatal. I think the heroine would have known this. And (I stopped reading after this...) there are absolutely NO coyotes in G.B.. It had the beginnings of a diverting tale, but I cant stand poor research on an author's part.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on April 9, 2014
I bought this as an e-book (thankfully for cheap) because I read that the author spent 5 years after reading Deveraux's "A Knight In Shining Armor" researching the period. Well I have no idea what kind of research Ragan did because a quick couple of hours scan of online history websites would have provided her with a lot more authenticity than her having a 15th century character understand the phrase "what makes you tick" or a myriad of other extremely disappointing errors.
Just recently I have read a lot of these *time slip/historical romances* and I hate to read reviews that criticize a decent author because they got a medieval vegetable wrong or some other trivial thing out of place ( I have read a considerable amount of non-fiction history books on the medieval and renaissance eras which was the root of my interest in this genre) and to expect total accuracy would be a bit much and may even distract from the actual story (those eras were not very nice, black death and all considered) To top it off the story had such great prospects until is got a bit obvious with where it was going.
I think what makes me actually angry about this book at angry at the author is that I feel she blatantly lied about researching the book's period and I find that very insulting to the reader's intelligence. I don't often leave reviews but I felt compelled to do so in this case.
Looking for fun and better accuracy try *She Owns the Knight* or my new favorite *True to the Highlander* both play a bit loose with history but they're great and fun. Looking for something more accurate than bodice ripper fare? - Outlander but it's a hefty book with it's own set of inaccuracies although the gripping story and sheer expanse of it forgives it any trivial problems
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on January 8, 2012
It's good that the synopsis begins with 'It's 1499', because one would have no way to guess when this 'historical' novel takes place (aside from the mention of which king is ruling England). The history is vague; I could have been convinced it took place in almost any year of the Middle Ages. The main female character contentedly settles into modern times (watching racy movies on TV)and has a very modern sensibility when she goes back to the past. The hero is a bit of a whiner, compiling a long list of things he just can't tolerate about the past, including bugs and dirt. The author doesn't seem to understand what historians actually do, for she says that her hero had never thought about what life was like for people in the past (!) and he shows very little curiosity about life in the past once he's gotten there. Despite being assured that he will return to his own time with no time having passed, he plans to return at the earliest possible moment to save his career. Apparently he's not thought of the benefits of arriving home with first-hand knowledge of the medieval era, and how that might enhance his career (even if he can't tell where he got the information, it would surely make his writing more vivid). I was constantly doubting whether this or that item really existed in 1499. This could have been a splendidly entertaining read if it had been better executed and supported by historical research.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on June 10, 2012
Professor Joe is a jerk, after 12 chapters of his selfish bitching I gave up. I can't believe some of you found this funny! If American men are like this you'd better come to Europe to find one girls!
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on March 8, 2012
When I read this, it felt like I was watching a hollywood movie. I almost feel like I need the deep well modulated male voice on the preview trailer reels to say something like: "One girl travels through time to find an unlikely hero. They journey back to the past to save her sister, save a kingdom, and find the courage to love. Based on the novel by..." you get what I mean.

The bones of the story are good, but there are issues with the rest of it. If you removed the dialogue and just described the happenings in its basic form, you would have an excellent story. The problem comes with the execution, the actual way that the book was written. I don't mean the grammar or the spelling. Those are fine.

It isn't even the language thats the problem. Some people have issues with the way the medieval girl speaks. They say that this isn't how someone from this time is supposed to talk. I don't have a problem with it, because it would be really hard to understand anyone from that time. Language has changed so much that a real person's words from that era would only be understood by a modern person, like myself, if they came with annotations and a dictionary. As long as she has the feel of authenticity (which she did) it would be fine (which it was).

My problems come with the way the characters got from one point to another, as well as the characters themselves.

They are basically pushed from one situation to the next by the giant hand of destiny. For example: the character has to get from point a to point b, but getting from a to b isn't something that the character would normally do, so c happens and the character is thrown to point b kicking and screaming. This is a common trope in adventure books, in fact it's the base of a great many stories. But at some point the character has to stand up and do something for himself or herself otherwise what would be the point? (I am aware of exceptions to this "rule" but because of the kind of story that this is, I dont think they apply here.) Coincidences happen again and agin for the sake of continuing the story.

This is a common thing found in some of those hollywood adventure comedy movies that have 2 characters who fall in love in the end. The only reason we watch them though (or at least I do) is the fact that the actors are compelling and/or hot. The amazing way they deliver mediocre lines has a lot to do with how much I end up enjoying the film. The way they carry themselves makes me believe in otherwise impossible motivations. And their reactions and expressions humanizes improbable events making them believable.

I'm not saying that the dialogue, motivations, and events in this book are mediocre, impossible, or improbable, rather, I think that they would only ring true to me if I imagine good actors performing them. Otherwise, they end up being actions that normal people wouldn't say, or do, or even live through. So throughout the book I found I had to distance myself from the characters in order to enjoy what was happening. I imagined other people playing those characters rather than myself.

It worked, and I enjoyed the book for what it was, an adventure comedy with romance.

3 stars. It was good as long I didn't put myself in the characters' shoes. It got better when I casted good actors to play the characters instead.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful
TOP 500 REVIEWERon April 20, 2011
I bought A Knight In Central Park on impulse after reading a blog dedicated to finding inexpensive yet highly rated books. The blog stated "Outlander fans, this one is for you". OK, I didn't expect anything on that level, however, I do believe that the time travel premise can be an outstanding method for a well researched novel to take the reader to a historical time and experience it through modern eyes.

That said, there is nothing historical, unique or even interesting in this book. This silly little romance could be placed in any time frame. The prose is so mundane and seems interchangeable with any book in its category.

The best thing about this book is the cover art.
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