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A Land of Ash Kindle Edition

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Length: 126 pages

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Product Details

  • File Size: 467 KB
  • Print Length: 126 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: B006ZOB2RU
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publication Date: November 5, 2010
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B004AYD6MG
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #288,691 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 41 people found the following review helpful By Amanda Hocking on December 11, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
"Land of Ash" is an anthology of short stories by David Dalglish, David McAfee, Daniel Arenson, John Fitch V, Michael Crane, and Robert Duperre. The premise is simple: The Yellowstone Caldera erupts, covering the world in ash, and that's the unifying theme between the eleven different stories. It's all about survivors, and how they deal with total devastation in a land covered in ash.

I read Full Dark, No Stars by Stephen King a few weeks back, and I like Land of Ash better. Not that I didn't like Full Dark, No Stars - because I really did. King is a master of the underrated medium of short stories and novellas. But I still enjoy Land of Ash more.

My favorite is "Shelter" by David Dalglish. It's about a father and his small child holing themselves up in the house after the ash comes. There's something so simple and bittersweet about it that's perfect.

That's not to say there's any bad stories in it - "Beach Puppies" is somewhat lighter than most of the other stories, and "Last Words" brings it down to a more personal level and less apocalyptic, if that makes sense
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44 of 50 people found the following review helpful By Lee Goldberg VINE VOICE on February 10, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The notion of an anthology of short stories, modeled after THE MARTIAN CHRONICLES, by different writers is a damn good one... and David Dalglish has certainly created a compelling springboard with a lot of potential that, unfortunately, isn't quite met. That said, there's a lot to like about this collection, particularly from Dalglish himself. Dalglish's voice is strong, assured, and compelling and there are lot of powerful images and sharply drawn characters (the descriptions of the Rio Grande in "A Harmless American" will stick with you long after you've finished the book). He sets the bar high with his opening story, but also a template that subsequent writers followed far too closely. His stories, and those by David McAfee and Daniel Arenson, are by far the strongest and most tonally consistent in voice and vision, but too many of them are simply vignettes about people awaiting their deaths rather than tales with any sort of beginning, middle and end...or complexity. That's also a problem with the collection as a whole. It's a shame there wasn't a larger, loose arc to the stories instead of just a collection of standalone character vignettes. There was nothing unifying them into a more satisfying, narrative whole. I wanted to feel like I was heading towards something...instead the collection just sort of petered out. But there's still much to enjoy in this collection and a chance to sample the work of some really terrific writers.
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54 of 62 people found the following review helpful By S. Mahon on November 14, 2010
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I haven't stayed up all night reading for a long time, but I started reading this and just couldn't stop. Usually when I buy a book of short stories, I read one here and there between other books--kind of a way to cleanse the palate of my mind between books. With these, I started reading and just couldn't stop. From the first one, "One Last Dinner Party" to the last, "Let it Continue", I couldn't stop.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Lynn McNamee on January 2, 2011
Format: Kindle Edition
Plot/Storyline: 5 Stars

What stood out most for me about this collection was the arrangement. It was so expertly done that it gave the feel of a novel told in short stories. Therefore, I'm going to deviate from my usual Short Story Collection Review Style and write this somewhat as though it were a novel.

The first few stories were about people who were either preparing to die from the ash conflagration or were attempting to get somewhere safe. The most heartbreaking was "Shelter," written by David Dalglish. I couldn't put this one down until I finished.

"Toward the Storm," also by David Dalglish, was another notable story in this excellent collection. This one was just creepy enough to be compared to a Stephen King tale. It could have been taken right out of The Stand. I think it was so disturbing because it showed the seamier side of humanity that could survive such a catastrophe.

"Secret Mission," yet another by Dalglish, yanked at the heart strings and brought me to tears. Seeing a refuge camp through the eyes of a child was gut wrenching.

"The One That Matters," by Robert Duperre, was an opposing force to "Toward the Storm." Instead of evil, it depicted a true hero, albeit an unsung one.

I've only mentioned my favorites among these eleven stories. However, all of them had something to add to this collection.

Characters: 5 Stars

Each story was peopled with characters that I could relate to or care about. The people in each of the stories were just average; they could be your neighbors, friends or co-workers. That was a big part of what made the collection so interesting, horrifying, and fun to read, all at the same time.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Nicholson on May 27, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"A land of Ash" is an anthology of 11 short stories, contributed to and edited by author David Dalglish. The paperback is 124 pages in length while the Kindle e-edition is a 396 Kb download. Interestingly enough the Kindle edition was free at the time of writing this review.

The anthology is written around an fictional apocalyptic event; the eruption of Yellowstone Caldera, resulting in a nuclear-type winter that descends over the world but most severely, over the continental U.S.A.
The eleven stories presented here are unrelated to each other, but share in common the human emotions and traits that so often come to fore when tragedy strikes...emotions and traits the can be stunningly beautiful or, shockingly deplorable.

I must mention that I don't usually like short story anthologies because I find invariably there are some (or several) that I don't like, maybe because of poor writing, uninteresting characters or just a boring story. Yet because I've started the book, I feel I must try to slog them through them in an attempt to finish what I've started. However, I was very please with this set of tales, every story was riveting and held my interest throughout. There were characters in these pages who, although you meet only briefly, become indelibly fixed in your mind.

Conclusion:
Eleven splendid fictional short works that focus around human action and reaction to an unexpected natural disaster that has global implications. 5 Stars.

Ray Nicholson

P.S.
As a personal note, I've just recently finished reading some of author David Dalglish's other works, the five book "The Half-Orcs" series and the first two books of his new 'Shadowdance' series.
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