A Love Supreme

August 19, 2003 | Format: MP3

$9.49
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
30
1
7:42
30
2
7:17
30
3
10:42
30
4
7:02


Product Details

  • Original Release Date: August 18, 2003
  • Release Date: August 18, 2003
  • Label: IMPULSE
  • Copyright: (C) 2003 The Verve Music Group, a Division of UMG Recordings, Inc.
  • Record Company Required Metadata: Music file metadata contains unique purchase identifier. Learn more.
  • Total Length: 32:43
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000V698WE
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (319 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,557 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

This is one of the best Jazz albums that I have ever heard!
T. Gore
I would just like to say to all the one-star-ratings people, LISTEN TO THIS ALBUM!!!!!!!
Proudmomofagayson
This is the album that made me truly listen to and explore the musical world of jazz.
Chet Fakir

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

107 of 111 people found the following review helpful By Michael Stack VINE VOICE on October 18, 2005
Format: Audio CD
Arguably the best album John Coltrane ever recorded and consistently mentioned as the greatest album in jazz, "A Love Supreme" lives up to everything that it is discussed as.

Coltrane was riding an artistic high-- enormously successful thanks to 1960's "My Favorite Things", he had quite a bit more latitude than many musicians, a producer who would support his every experiment in Bob Thiele, and a band willing to go wherever he needed (pianist McCoy Tyner, bassist Jimmy Garrison and drummer Elvin Jones) who he'd developed a rapport with over three years of constantly working together. He'd just recorded the stunning "Crescent" several months earlier and entered the studio in December to record this suite.

The piece, as indicated by the liner notes Coltrane penned, is spiritually informed, a prayer offered to God. The music itself is based on relatively traditional structures, but Coltrane manages to juggle a number of influences and sounds-- shades of Thelonious Monk, Miles Davis, Ornette Coleman and Albert Ayler all run through it. The suite is broken in four movements-- "Acknowledgement" is patient and building, revolving around a four-note bass motif-- Trane is exploratory and yearning. After a brief bass solo, this moves into the frantic "Resolution", where Coltrane rails against his theme, turns things over to a oddly meditative yet equally frantic Tyner, and then solos himself in Monkish fashion-- extrapolating off his theme and exploring the sort of spiritual ecstacy that he heard in Ayler.
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137 of 146 people found the following review helpful By Manny Hernandez HALL OF FAME on September 17, 2003
Format: Audio CD
In a time when jazz was becoming less popular, this four-part masterpiece recorded in 1964, is John Coltrane's attempt to give thanks to God. In doing so, and regardless of your religious beliefs, he delivers a performance in the company of McCoy Tyner (piano), Jimmy Garrison (bass) and Elvin Jones (drums) that makes it clear what he meant when he said in 1966 he planned "to become a saint" in response to the question about his plans for the next decade. Sadly, he died of cancer not too long after that statement, but he left a legacy of work that -like this album- are testimony of what an inspired soul can let flow and give to others. Today, almost forty years after its original release, Coltrane's memory is alive and kicking and his timeless work continues to inspire musicians of all genres across the world. In my journey of discovery of this beautiful jazz music, this album has turned out to be a true musical revelation and I want to share it with you too.
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30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By T. B. Vick on December 12, 2000
Format: Audio CD
This album is pure and raw Jazz. Every song demonstrates Coltrane's prowess on the sax. In one word this album is 'emotion.' Coltrane seems to poor his whole heart into this project. All the players are in peak performance mode and it shows as each take their turn demonstrating their talents. On the track titled "Resolution" McCoy Tyner struts his stuff on the piano, and Coltrane makes his sax literally cry. I would consider this one of the greatest Jazz albums of all time.
Historically speaking, this was one of only two albums that Coltrane recorded all year in 1964. Coltrane's other album that year was titled "Crescent." "Love Supreme" was awarded gold status by 1970 and I can see why, it is a great album.
The beginning of "Pursuance/Part 4 - Psalm" is a drum set that is wonderful and then Coltrane comes screaming into the song with a wonderful brassy sax sound. This is followed by Tyner who is all over the keys of the piano. This last track is pure and raw emotional jazz.
This album could hold a slot next to Miles Davis' work titled "Kind of Blue." The album is dedicated to God, whom Coltrane says in the inserts, is the "Love Supreme." If you don't have this album then you are missing one of the greatest Jazz album's ever recorded. Get it and see why all the reviews below rave on about this masterpiece.
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68 of 77 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 17, 1999
Format: Audio CD
John Coltrane, one of the true masters of jazz, affected every corner of the jazz world when he released this album. The sheer power and beauty of the music breathed new life into jazz and streched the imaginations of many. To this day, A Love Supreme is an album that can be an inspiration to all people around the globe. His music is so extraordinarily powerful - it can make one laugh, cry, get angry, beam in utter rapture, and love and fear God.
To me, on this album John Coltrane not only grabs at every human emotion, but manages to become that emotion. That's what the album really is - it is raw human emotion, pulsating out of every drum beat, every bass hit, every chord, and every saxophone note. When John Coltrane created this album with his quartet, it almost sounds as if he were possessed by God and became everything the human soul embodies.
While some may claim that the album isn't good for relaxing after work or on a Sunday afternoon, I would say that exacly the opposite is true. Every time I listen to that album, I am put in a trance, a state so indescribably euphoric that I could exist like that forever.
But alas, the album is only 45 minutes long...
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