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A Nice Tuesday Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 342 pages
  • Publisher: Bison Books (September 1, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0803276257
  • ISBN-13: 978-0803276253
  • Product Dimensions: 8.1 x 5.4 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,506,534 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

One the best writers on baseball in any lineup, Jordan arrived at his typewriter with first-hand experience: his Major League dreams were snuffed out in the low minors by an arm and an attitude that were less than dazzling. A False Spring, his classic account of his youthful experiences--and indiscretions--on the mound, remains a cornerstone of any good baseball library. A Nice Tuesday picks up the Jordan saga some three decades later. It is more than a complement to the earlier memoir, it's a perfect fit.

Well past the prime he never had, Jordan, at 56, realizes he still can't shake the game or the way the failure of not making it continues to haunt him. Setting out to confront his past, he tries stepping back into it, detailing moment by moment the excruciating process of struggling into shape for his shot to pitch a minor league game with the Waterbury Saints. At the same time, he also describes with painful precision what it takes to repair old wounds within the family. That both processes lead to a sense of peace with who he is and the journey his life has taken is the kind of stat that stands up favorably to any win-loss record.

Jordan is a powerful writer, his prose riding carefully controlled waves of muscularity, tenderness, understanding, and insight. Sports may be his arena here, but metaphysics is his game. "In our late fifties," he writes of himself and his wife, "we lived our lives in a Twilight Zone. We were both young and old. With one hand we held on to our fading youth, bikini thongs and pitching baseballs.... We both knew that the days of our youth were closing fast." What Jordan makes clear throughout A Nice Tuesday is that hearing the footsteps of time approaching isn't tantamount to being overtaken by them. --Jeff Silverman --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

In his much-admired 1975 memoir A False Spring (Hungry Mind, 1998. reprint), Jordan told of his failure as a young aspiring pitcher and his successful rebirth as a journalist. Now, at 56, an age far past the end of even the best baseball careers, he labors to pitch once more, revisiting his youthful disappointment by joining a minor league team, the Waterbury (Connecticut) Spirit. He recalls his boyhood pitching promise, his domineering brother, and his alienated first wife and children. Though happily remarried with six beloved dogs and writing success, he struggles to pitch alongside teammates half his age. This second installment of Jordan's saga, often raunchy but still touching, is heartily recommended for both adult and young adult collections.AMorey Berger, St. Joseph's Hosp. Lib., Tucson, AZ
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.3 out of 5 stars
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I found myself laughing out loud in many parts of the book.
Timothy J. Bazzett
A Nice Tuesday is an excellent choice for any adult reader, male or female, young, middle aged or old.
Brian Sullivan
Unusual events happenn to him and he writes about them unusually well.
logistician

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Brian Sullivan on November 7, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is not about baseball, and it is not a sequel to "A False Spring," which was a classic in its own right. It is also not about dogs, cigars, fast cars or South Florida, although all of those things figure prominently in the book. Instead, "A Nice Tuesday" is a deeper, fuller portrait of an unusually talented guy living out his life as best he can despite a nagging feeling that he has failed.
That may not sound particularly interesting, but Pat Jordan himself is a far better subject than 99% of the atheletes he usually writes about. He is an intelligent guy, with a wide range of interests. His writing captures that struggle we all go through of being able to perceive our shortcomings and only have limited success trying to change them. But, at least he does try. In this book, he's completely unafraid to reveal himself through his writing.
Beyond this, Jordan is a very skilled writer. He has a great sense of judgment as to what will capture and keep the reader's attention. He doesn't abuse this gift by lingering on his stories too long. There are dozens of memorable scenes and vignettes in this book, but it does not come off as being choppy or disorganized. The connections make sense to Jordan, and he convinces the reader that they should make sense.
Although this is non-fiction, the book "A Nice Tuesday" resembles most closely is "The World According to Garp" by John Irving. I mean that as a compliment; Garp is one of my favorite books of all time. For me, the similarities are in how Jordan and Garp are both fascinating individuals who have improbable life experiences -- much more interesting than the rest of us -- develop a unique way of looking at life, surround themselves with unusual, even quirky companions and still manage to come off as average guys.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 22, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This is a wonderfully intimate look into the life of a failed baseball pitcher who comes to embrace life's reversals and use them to his advantage. Without fully realizing the success he had become, author Jordan sought, after thirty years, to find his lost baseball career. Instead we read how he comes to find peace in his family, friends, and pets. The author's sensativity is not eclipsed by his gruff personality - it is enhanced. He is nothing if not a contradiction. Child pitching star and professional baseball failure. Father to five children who do not speak to him, and patriarch to a group of loving "usual suspects". A husband of questionable value to his first wife, but of ultimate worth to his second. A dog-owner who through a lack of sensativity allowed his childhood pet to die of lonliness, but who in his middle age devotes himself to a pack of noble hounds who teach him more about life than his parents were able to do. Author Pat Jordan takes us into places most people would not invite us to visit. We learn more of life than of baseball in A NICE TUESDAY. A pitcher's tunnel vision, his ability to focus only on the throw, was something lacking in Jordan's sports career - he saw too much. What was a flaw for him as a pitcher is what makes him a great author. This story has as its backdrop the game of baseball. But at its core it is a story of a man's journey through life and all the pains and pleasures that life brings. This book will appeal to baseball fans, but its reach is far broader.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 7, 1999
Format: Hardcover
This book sneaks up on you. Jordan writes not just of baseball, but of life, death, failure, dog-packs and teenagers, cigars and smugglers, estrangement and reconciliation. One paraphrase stays with me about his life...when signed for a $50,000 bonus in 1959, Jordan cried because he did not break a record for bonus signings. Nevermind that the amount was more than either his father or brother had seen in a lifetime! He says in retrospect, "I never appreciated the gifts I was given, because I was so busy paying attention to the gifts I wanted!" At 56, and considerably more humble, Jordan writes of a life that is about redemption, and has a message for all of us. His writing is raw, but resonant. Read this if you are a fan of baseball, love it because he is a true storyteller.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R. Cryan on January 6, 2011
Format: Paperback
This was a well-written memoir, up to a point, by a well-known jerk. The author cruelly betrays the confidences of the teenager he hires to catch him. He thinks about noone but himself.

Nevertheless, the book is very readable until his emotional breakdown in the closing chapters: after exhibiting a near-complete disregard for most of the human beings he encounters, he completely falls apart at the death of his dogs, dissolving into near hysteria.

What a mess. What a jerk.

Stick with A False Spring, which also shows Jordan up as jerk, but remains a classic nonetheless.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Bent on March 18, 2004
Format: Hardcover
I don't think I can add much to the praise bestowed upon this book by the previous reviewers, other than to mention two things I found special about this memoir (come on Amazon proofreaders, get it right!).
1. I found the book an incredibly interesting portrait of a man that is eerily DISsimilar to myself, yet I could relate and empathise with his life and dreams.
2. Chapter Three, which is a self-deprecating look at a typical day in the life of a man "...rooted in his routine." is one of the best individual chapters of any book I have read recently. He describes an unremarkable S. Florida day with such clarity and humor that I found myself thinking as I read, "yeah, and then what did you do?"
I am moving on to A False Spring with anticipation...
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