Customer Reviews


349 Reviews
5 star:
 (246)
4 star:
 (71)
3 star:
 (17)
2 star:
 (10)
1 star:
 (5)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


93 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absorbing read...
Dear Amazon.com Readers,
With a passenger list in the back, detailing those who survived and those who didn't, "A Night to Remember," is a harrowing account of the Titanic's ill-fated journey from Europe to the United States.
The book really tells of the people who spent fortunes to get aboard the Titanic, the most luxurious cruiseliner of the time...
Published on July 29, 2000 by Daniel Sutton

versus
63 of 73 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic Book - Though Now Dated
This is a classic book on the sinking of the Titanic and the first book I ever read on the subject. It should be understood before reading this book that our collective understanding of the Titanic disaster has moved on since the time A Night to Remember was first published in 1956. For example upon discovering the wreck of the Titanic at the bottom of the Atlantic in...
Published on November 21, 2005 by father2


‹ Previous | 1 235 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

93 of 96 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars An absorbing read..., July 29, 2000
By 
Daniel Sutton (New York, NY, United States of America) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Dear Amazon.com Readers,
With a passenger list in the back, detailing those who survived and those who didn't, "A Night to Remember," is a harrowing account of the Titanic's ill-fated journey from Europe to the United States.
The book really tells of the people who spent fortunes to get aboard the Titanic, the most luxurious cruiseliner of the time. I really don't think that this book can be compared to the movie "Titanic." They are both such different stories, that saying one is like the other is missing the point.
"A Night to Remember is much more than Hollywook hype. It is really more of a personal account of what happened aboard the ship, and the horrors of the sinking and of the rescues (most people died, only a few survived). I highly recommend this book to anyone who has an interest in the saga of the Titanic. This book is based solidly on fact, which is one reason I like it so much. I remember reading this several years ago, and being kept up at night as a result.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


42 of 42 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars way better than the movie, June 14, 2000
I must be the only person who read this book years before the movie came out. As a child, this was one of my very favorite books that I have since reread many times. Lord captures everything: the social mores, the lavish banquets, the characters (the captain!), the conditions on the rest of the ship, and the tragedy of it all. The movie leaves nothing to the imagination, but this account is truly superb. If you never got a chance to read it, don't delay. You'll learn almost everything about the tragedy from a master story teller. The scenes right before they strike the iceburg are incredible, as are every scene of the evacuation. Finally, it's clear why no one wanted to leave the security of the ship. The worst tragedy of all was that many of the lifeboats were lowered with hardly anyone on them because they were afraid to leave the ship. Many more lives could have been saved.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


52 of 54 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Riveting Classic, March 18, 1998
I first read Walter Lord's "A Night to Remember" in the summer of 1968 as part of my required reading list for freshman year of high school. I was so fascinated by the account that I read it at least three times that summer and early fall. It brought to chilling life one of the greatest maritime disasters in history. As I read the dog-eared, yellowing, crinkled-paper copy of the paperback (its purchase price was sixty-cents back then) once again last year as a "mature" 42 year old, Mr. Lord's brilliant account of the tragedy still held my attention. His vivid, detailed, yet smooth flowing narrative brought back the excitement as felt as a young teenager, in a way that few books have. I recently viewed the movie "Titanic" with my fourteen year old daughter. The movie was thoroughly enjoyable, but there were some aspects of the book (such as the spectre of a rescue ship only a few precious miles away)that could have added to the drama. The book is worth reading both as literature as well as history.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


63 of 73 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Classic Book - Though Now Dated, November 21, 2005
By 
This is a classic book on the sinking of the Titanic and the first book I ever read on the subject. It should be understood before reading this book that our collective understanding of the Titanic disaster has moved on since the time A Night to Remember was first published in 1956. For example upon discovering the wreck of the Titanic at the bottom of the Atlantic in 1985 it was clear that the Titanic had indeed broken in half and rested upon the sea bed in two halves. As anybody who has seen the 1958 film "A Night To Remember" will realise this book presents the ship as sinking whole, which was not the case. But this is not to say that this book does not have a lot of outstanding information to impart to the interested reader. The book considers the Titanic from the time in 1907 when she was conceived, the building of the Titanic, the maiden voyage and the sinking and finally the subsequent investigations and recriminations. Particularly thought provoking is the full listing of the passengers at the back of the book including those who survived along with those who perished. What I found particularly shocking was the listing of Third Class Passengers, with its very low numbers of survivors. Walter Lord's book is very easy to read, though the subject matter is somewhat more difficult to digest, due to the overwhelming nature of the Titanic tragedy.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


20 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Book to Remember, September 19, 2004
By 
Konrei "Everything I need is right here" (Boca Raton, Florida and Brooklyn, New York) - See all my reviews
(TOP 1000 REVIEWER)   
No matter how many times you revisit it, A NIGHT TO REMEMBER, the granddaddy of all Titanic books, remains as fresh a read today as it did fifty years ago. Walter Lord is still universally regarded as "the man who knows everything about the Titanic" and this fast-paced, detail-laden, and dramatically visualized book is the reason why and the product of that reason.

A NIGHT TO REMEMBER transports you to the decks of the Titanic that cold April night so convincingly that you are left with an eerie chill-between-your-shoulder blades feeling as the great ship goes down.

You share the early complacency of the passengers on the 'unsinkable' ship. Your sense of impending doom grows as the bows disappear below the glassy Atlantic. You grit your teeth at the obtuseness of the crew of the Californian---why, oh why, didn't they question those white rockets?---and you share in the breathless trauma of those on shore as the story unfolds.

Sure, since the discovery of the wreck many questions have been answered (and a few more posed). Some of Lord's information is dated (the ship did in fact break in half, for example). There have been other 'Titanic' books, and they explore almost every aspect of the disaster in meticulous detail; even Lord's follow-up The Night Lives On: The Untold Stories & Secrets Behind the Sinking of the Unsinkable Ship-Titanic falls into this category. But no one has ever told the story of the RMS Titanic any better, and it's likely they never will.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 16 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Bare Bones Account, August 15, 2000
Walter Lord is one of the best historical authors of the 20th Century. His storytelling talent shows through in his classic account of the sinking of the Titanic. The book's only flaw is its brevity. The narrative portion is only 135 pages in small paperback form and starts just as the ship is about to hit the iceberg. There is no background story to give the reader perspective of the ship's construction or of the passengers whose stories it follows. Also lacking is much detail about the aftermath of the sinking. The actual sinking is retold in riveting first person accounts that detail those fatal final moments and all of their tragedies and ironies. In fact, Lord's account was good enough to make me want to seek out a more complete history of the disaster.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars You ARE there..., January 17, 2000
If James Cameron's film Titanic made you feel you were there by watching it, (and I'm sure plenty of people feel that way but don't want to admit it since it's unfashionable right now), Walter Lord's book makes you feel the same way by reading about it. Minute by minute, detail by detail, with survivior accounts making it all the more real, we hear the story, the familiar details and plenty of ones we never heard before. Gripping with every turn of the page, your pulse races as you ache to find out what will happen next, though in the back of your head you already know. Walter Lord is a great historian and a great storyteller, and these skills are what make this book invaluable to any Titanic buff or anyone who likes a good story, or just anyone in general.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Still The Best You Are On Board The Titanic Read, March 28, 2012
By 
microfiche (Scarborough, ON Canada) - See all my reviews
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: A Night to Remember (Kindle Edition)
James Cameron and I are the same age, and I first read ANTR when I was nine. It blew me down, especially the part where Major Peuchen rappelled down the side. (The Rank Movie should have used an actor that was not an English idea of a Yankee. He was as Canadian as James Cameron and me. I saw him, spot on, in Boat Six with Mrs. Brown. Jim. Why did you not show his descent? Better than Jack and Rose endless running.)
But read this book. It was written in the 1950's, before the discovery of the ship's remains; but Mr. Lord corresponded with almost all survivors living at the time, and had all the survivor accounts published in books to that time. He wrote what was known, or said was known. It comes from them, and it is a masterly job of putting it all into a chronological account.

It is the BEST "You Are There" narrative about the tragic night.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Minute-by-Minute Account of the Sinking of the Titanic, January 25, 2007
By 
Jeremy (Winfield, IL, United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: A Night to Remember (Paperback)
At 11:40 p.m. on the night of April 14, 1912, the White Star liner Titanic, on its maiden voyage to New York, struck an iceberg in the north Atlantic. Less than three hours later, the ship known to the world as "unsinkable" was on her way to the bottom of the sea.

The unexpectedness of the event, along with the shocking number of lives lost (more than 1500 by most estimates) and the many stories of carelessness and incompetence contributing to the disaster, cemented the Titanic into the collective consciousness of Western culture. Countless articles, exhibits, books, and movies (the most famous, released in 1997, grossed over $1.8 billion in worldwide revenue) have documented and fictionalized various aspects of the tragedy. Even nearly a hundred years later, it would be difficult to find someone who had never heard of the Titanic.

In 1955, while many of the survivors of the Titanic's first and only voyage were still alive--and before the journalistic novel became fashionable as a genre--Walter Lord researched and wrote a minute-by-minute account of what happened during the ship's final night. Called A Night to Remember, Lord's account provides an interesting blend of minute details and broad sweeping overviews in its description of what happened onboard the ship.

The book is easy to read and goes very quickly. Lord gives his prose a very journalistic feel, with short sentences and easy language. Entertaining is hardly the right word to use for a description of an event that claimed so many lives, but compelling describes the account pretty well. Lord puts readers right on the deck of the doomed ship, and then right into the lifeboats and, later, into the courtrooms and newspaper editors' offices during the aftermath of the sinking.

Chapters are entitled with snippets of the dialog that occurs within each. Examples include "There's Talk of an Iceberg, Ma'am," "God Himself Could Not Sink This Ship," "There Is Your Beautiful Nightdress Gone," and, perhaps most poignant, "Go Away--We Have Just Seen Our Husbands Drown."

The book's primary weakness is that in trying to include glimpses of so many people's experiences, Lord was mostly unable to go into much depth with any of the individual characters. Unlike later books in this genre--such as Blackhawk Down or The Perfect Storm, both of which describe in detail the experiences of a relatively small number of people during catastrophic events--A Night to Remember has to catalogue the experiences of over 2,000 individuals. Lord manages to include a lot of names, but without any background or detail, they quickly become meaningless.

Though the scope of the book (probably necessarily) minimizes the amount of emotion connected with the tragedy, there are a few emotive moments when the reader realizes along with a child or a wife that a beloved husband or father will not be coming on a lifeboat. Depictions of the wireless operator sleeping onboard the nearby Californian, panicky passengers in lifeboats violently refusing to assist drowning swimmers, and determined high-society men donning formal evening dress to "go down like gentlemen" evoke flashes of emotion as well.

Overall, the book is worth reading for its historically accurate picture of what actually happened on that cold April night. Though it's no literary masterpiece, it is informative and interesting, particularly for anyone who has seen James Cameron's movie or read Clive Cussler's book and would like to know the real story. The book contains nothing objectionable (except for the event itself), and is suitable for any reader. I recommend it without reservation.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Night to Remember, January 7, 2001
By A Customer
Publishing for the first time in 1955, Walter Lord's novel remains unsurpassed in accuracy and excitement. To fulfill his purpose, Lord interviewed the few Titanic survivors in effort to create the most precise and vivid picture of what happened out in the Atlantic on that moonlit night in 1912. This book allows readers to step on board the luxury liner with an explosion of the emotions the passengers felt that night they knew there was no where to go but into the freezing icy water of the ocean. Devoid of Hollywood glamour, Lord tells exactly what happened when it happened as told by those who were actually there. With chapters brilliantly titled with heart-wrenching words of the passengers, Lord is able to describe in complete detail the events as they occurred minute-by-minute from the point of view of different passengers. Some passengers stayed in bed despite the jolt of the iceberg, some continued to drink and smoke in the lounges, and some went up on deck to investigate while others played a game of soccer with chunks of ice. By his exceptional use of lead-ins and transitions, Lord's novel flows in a remarkable manner. Descriptions are depicted in such intense detail that any reader can taste the gourmet meals of the first class, see the excessively adorned quarters, hear the chilling silence, and feel the pain of the frigid water.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 235 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

A Night to Remember
A Night to Remember by Walter Lord
$8.54
Add to wishlist See buying options
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.