Buy New
$23.99
Qty:1
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
In Stock.
Sold by megahitrecords and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
A Patch of Blue has been added to your Cart
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $3.08
Learn More
Trade in now
Other Sellers on Amazon
Add to Cart
$23.99
& FREE Shipping on orders over $35.00. Details
Sold by: SOUTHWEST MEDIA
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • A Patch of Blue
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

A Patch of Blue

141 customer reviews


"Minions" Now Available for Pre-order
Customers who have shown an interest in Kids and Family titles might like to know that "Minions" is now available for pre-order.
$23.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details In Stock. Sold by megahitrecords and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

A Patch of Blue + Guess Who's Coming to Dinner (40th Anniversary Edition) + To Sir, With Love
Price for all three: $41.32

Buy the selected items together


Editorial Reviews

A black man's burgeoning love affair with a blind white girl is complicated by her racist, controlling mother.

Special Features

  • "Sidney Poitier: The Legacy" essay
  • Stills gallery
  • Awards notes

Product Details

  • Actors: Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters, Elizabeth Hartman, Wallace Ford, Ivan Dixon
  • Directors: Guy Green
  • Writers: Guy Green, Elizabeth Kata
  • Producers: Guy Green, Kathryn Hereford, Pandro S. Berman
  • Format: Anamorphic, Black & White, Closed-captioned, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono), French (Dolby Digital 2.0 Mono)
  • Subtitles: English, Spanish, French
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 2.35:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: February 4, 2003
  • Run Time: 105 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (141 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00007G1ZL
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #56,836 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "A Patch of Blue" on IMDb

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

126 of 136 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 4, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
This is a wonderful low-budget, black and white film starring a great cast of actors: Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters, Wallace Ford, and then newcomer, Elizabeth Hartman. It was filmed in 1965, at the height of the civil rights movement, and was then notable for its budding inter-racial romance. While this aspect may seem rather tame today, at the time the movie was filmed, this was still a somewhat controversial theme in many parts of America.
Elizabeth Hartman, in an exquisitely poignant performance for which she was nominated for an Academy Award, plays the part of Selina D'Arcy, an eighteen year old blind girl who lives an isolated and impoverished, almost Dickensian, existence. She lives with her abusive mother, Rose-Ann (Shelley Winters), who moonlights as a prostitute, and her drunken, though somewhat well-meaning, grandfather, whom she calls Ole Pa (Wallace Ford). Uneducated, having never gone to school, Selina spends her time stringing beads to earn some money for the family, cleaning up after her mother and grandfather, and being at the receiving end of constant physical abuse and verbal invectives heaped upon her by her mother. Hers is, indeed, a draconian existence.
One day, she prevails upon her grandfather to drop her off in the park, where she proceeds to sit under a tree, stringing her beads. There, she meets a kindly, well-educated business man, Gordon Ralphe (Sidney Poitier), who takes an interest in her and her quick appreciation for any kindness done to her. She responds to Gordon's kindness as if she were a flower turning its face to the sun for continued warmth. He, in turn, is touched by her eager interest in even the most mundane of matters. They continue to meet under that tree as often as possible, and a relationship develops.
Read more ›
6 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Marie Johnson on March 26, 2006
Format: DVD
I remember seeing this movie as a child, and I was very impressed then, and I still am. I purchased the DVD because I remembered how much I enjoyed the movie as a child. When I watched it again, I appreciated it more because it was so important for its time. Racism and prejudice was rampant at the time this movie was made, in 1965. It speaks to the need for tolerance and justice back then, just as much as it does today. This was my first exposure to the talents of Sidney Poitier, and Shelly Winters won an Academy Award for her portrayal of the main character's abusive mother. I can't stress how touching and worthwhile this movie is. Watch it...I know you'll enjoy it as much as I did.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 23, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
The key to the success of this film is its simplicity, including that it's in black and white. There is nothing to distract you from being enfolded in its beauty, and so your emotional involvement in characters, setting and plot is complete. It is a perfect period piece belonging to 1965, but its appeal is timeless. It's personal appealto me was as strong as if I were dreaming, and had the role of the blind girl! I dangled in emotional suspense until the very last scene, which shouldn't be revealed to those who haven't seen it! As an allegory of the civil rights movement, it spins the tale of gross injustice that could've continued were it not for one individual intervening for right (as in a small number of courageous people's protests bringing an end to the darkness of Jim Crow injustice). This is also a wonderful modern-day Cinderella story, complete with a prince (Poitier) who breaks the spell of the wicked mother (Winters). However the film is viewed the quality shines! The most important point in this film is the juxtaposition of characters, in which Poitier's character represents the voice of reason and responsibility, a ground-breaking role for a black man in 1965.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Only-A-Child VINE VOICE on March 21, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
They did an outstanding job of transferring this film to DVD and the 2.35x1 aspect ratio is how you want to see this; especially for the scenes in the apartment. They must have found an almost perfect print (or the original MGM negative) because the DVD is as crisp and clean as any I have ever seen. Because B&W relies so much on contrast and shadows there is often a problem with the old prints, but this well shot feature looks as good as it did in 1965.
It took me almost 40 years to finally see "A Patch of Blue". It was promoted as the kind of trendy, raise your social consciousness movie that I avoid like the plague. The mid-sixties was full of this kind of moralizing political stuff, as the country finally began to wake up to the embarrassing social inequities and the hypocrisy that hung over everything like a cloud of poison gas. The older half of the baby boomer generation was beginning to question the fear and hate of their parents, and Hollywood was beginning to discover that this had exploitation potential. Most of these things were moronic at the time and have not improved with age.

Ironically, what led to my finally viewing this film was watching Catherine Deneuve in another film from 1965; Polanski's "Repulsion". Writing a review of that film I lamented the failure of the Academy to nominate Deneuve for Best Actress and Polanski for Best Director. Whatever was thought then about the films and performances actually nominated, in retrospect they pale in comparison to "Repulsion". No one even gives a thought anymore to "Darling" or "Ship of Fools", "Doctor Zhivago" is more big that it is good, and Julie Andrews was great in a very weak movie (but decent musical).
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?