A Patch of Blue 1965 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(130) IMDb 8.1/10
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A black man's burgeoning love affair with a blind white girl is complicated by her racist, controlling mother.

Starring:
Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters
Runtime:
1 hour, 46 minutes

Available to watch on supported devices.

A Patch of Blue

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Product Details

Genres Drama, Romance
Director Guy Green
Starring Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters
Supporting actors Elizabeth Hartman, Wallace Ford, Ivan Dixon, Elisabeth Fraser, John Qualen, Kelly Flynn, Debi Storm, Renata Vanni, Saverio LoMedico, Vincent Chase, Tom Curtis, Fred Holliday, Dorothy Lovett, Gregg Martell, David Richards, Robert Williams
Studio Warner Bros.
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

One of the best movies I have ever seen.
eunice casasola
Selena is a blind girl, raised by her trashy mother and alcoholic grandfather, who lives a sequestered life in their tiny apartment.
H. Jennings
Watch it...I know you'll enjoy it as much as I did.
Marie Johnson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

125 of 134 people found the following review helpful By Lawyeraau HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 4, 2004
Format: VHS Tape
This is a wonderful low-budget, black and white film starring a great cast of actors: Sidney Poitier, Shelley Winters, Wallace Ford, and then newcomer, Elizabeth Hartman. It was filmed in 1965, at the height of the civil rights movement, and was then notable for its budding inter-racial romance. While this aspect may seem rather tame today, at the time the movie was filmed, this was still a somewhat controversial theme in many parts of America.
Elizabeth Hartman, in an exquisitely poignant performance for which she was nominated for an Academy Award, plays the part of Selina D'Arcy, an eighteen year old blind girl who lives an isolated and impoverished, almost Dickensian, existence. She lives with her abusive mother, Rose-Ann (Shelley Winters), who moonlights as a prostitute, and her drunken, though somewhat well-meaning, grandfather, whom she calls Ole Pa (Wallace Ford). Uneducated, having never gone to school, Selina spends her time stringing beads to earn some money for the family, cleaning up after her mother and grandfather, and being at the receiving end of constant physical abuse and verbal invectives heaped upon her by her mother. Hers is, indeed, a draconian existence.
One day, she prevails upon her grandfather to drop her off in the park, where she proceeds to sit under a tree, stringing her beads. There, she meets a kindly, well-educated business man, Gordon Ralphe (Sidney Poitier), who takes an interest in her and her quick appreciation for any kindness done to her. She responds to Gordon's kindness as if she were a flower turning its face to the sun for continued warmth. He, in turn, is touched by her eager interest in even the most mundane of matters. They continue to meet under that tree as often as possible, and a relationship develops.
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31 of 32 people found the following review helpful By Marie Johnson on March 26, 2006
Format: DVD
I remember seeing this movie as a child, and I was very impressed then, and I still am. I purchased the DVD because I remembered how much I enjoyed the movie as a child. When I watched it again, I appreciated it more because it was so important for its time. Racism and prejudice was rampant at the time this movie was made, in 1965. It speaks to the need for tolerance and justice back then, just as much as it does today. This was my first exposure to the talents of Sidney Poitier, and Shelly Winters won an Academy Award for her portrayal of the main character's abusive mother. I can't stress how touching and worthwhile this movie is. Watch it...I know you'll enjoy it as much as I did.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 23, 2000
Format: VHS Tape
The key to the success of this film is its simplicity, including that it's in black and white. There is nothing to distract you from being enfolded in its beauty, and so your emotional involvement in characters, setting and plot is complete. It is a perfect period piece belonging to 1965, but its appeal is timeless. It's personal appealto me was as strong as if I were dreaming, and had the role of the blind girl! I dangled in emotional suspense until the very last scene, which shouldn't be revealed to those who haven't seen it! As an allegory of the civil rights movement, it spins the tale of gross injustice that could've continued were it not for one individual intervening for right (as in a small number of courageous people's protests bringing an end to the darkness of Jim Crow injustice). This is also a wonderful modern-day Cinderella story, complete with a prince (Poitier) who breaks the spell of the wicked mother (Winters). However the film is viewed the quality shines! The most important point in this film is the juxtaposition of characters, in which Poitier's character represents the voice of reason and responsibility, a ground-breaking role for a black man in 1965.
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27 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Only-A-Child VINE VOICE on March 21, 2005
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
They did an outstanding job of transferring this film to DVD and the 2.35x1 aspect ratio is how you want to see this; especially for the scenes in the apartment. They must have found an almost perfect print (or the original MGM negative) because the DVD is as crisp and clean as any I have ever seen. Because B&W relies so much on contrast and shadows there is often a problem with the old prints, but this well shot feature looks as good as it did in 1965.
It took me almost 40 years to finally see "A Patch of Blue". It was promoted as the kind of trendy, raise your social consciousness movie that I avoid like the plague. The mid-sixties was full of this kind of moralizing political stuff, as the country finally began to wake up to the embarrassing social inequities and the hypocrisy that hung over everything like a cloud of poison gas. The older half of the baby boomer generation was beginning to question the fear and hate of their parents, and Hollywood was beginning to discover that this had exploitation potential. Most of these things were moronic at the time and have not improved with age.

Ironically, what led to my finally viewing this film was watching Catherine Deneuve in another film from 1965; Polanski's "Repulsion". Writing a review of that film I lamented the failure of the Academy to nominate Deneuve for Best Actress and Polanski for Best Director. Whatever was thought then about the films and performances actually nominated, in retrospect they pale in comparison to "Repulsion". No one even gives a thought anymore to "Darling" or "Ship of Fools", "Doctor Zhivago" is more big that it is good, and Julie Andrews was great in a very weak movie (but decent musical).
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