A Pocket for Corduroy and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $3.40 (20%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
A Pocket for Corduroy has been added to your Cart
Used: Acceptable | Details
Sold by Prime1
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Hard cover clean, pages have normal wear. The pages show normal wear and tear. All shipping handled by Amazon. Prime eligible when you buy from us!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

A Pocket for Corduroy Hardcover – March 6, 1978


See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.59
$8.07 $0.01
Audio CD
"Please retry"

"Playtown: Airport" by Roger Priddy
Roger Priddy's passion for educating children through fun, informative books has led him to create some of the most enduring early learning books. See more
$13.59 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

A Pocket for Corduroy + Corduroy Lost and Found + Corduroy Bear 13" Soft Toy
Price for all three: $48.45

These items are shipped from and sold by different sellers.

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

"The Big Book of Paw Patrol" by Golden Books
Everything you need to know about the awesome and adorable rescue pups of Nickelodeon’s "PAW Patrol" and is sure to thrill readers. See more

Product Details

  • Age Range: 3 - 5 years
  • Series: Corduroy
  • Hardcover: 32 pages
  • Publisher: Viking; 1st ed edition (March 6, 1978)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 067056172X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0670561728
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 0.3 x 8.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (71 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #40,159 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Don Freeman was born in San Diego, California, in 1908. At an early age, he received a trumpet as a gift from his father. He practiced obsessively and eventually joined a California dance band. After graduating from high school, he ventured to New York City to study art under the tutelage of Joan Sloan and Harry Wickey at the Art Students' League. He managed to support himself throughout his schooling by playing his trumpet evenings, in nightclubs and at weddings.

Gradually, he eased into making a living sketching impressions of Broadway shows for The New York Times and The Herald Tribune. This shift was helped along, in no small part, by a rather heartbreaking incident: he lost his trumpet. One evening, he was so engrossed in sketching people on the subway, he simply forgot it was sitting on the seat beside him. This new career turned out to be a near-perfect fit for Don, though, as he had always loved the theater.

He was introduced to the world of children’s literature when William Saroyan asked him to illustrate several books. Soon after, he began to write and illustrate his own books, a career he settled into comfortably and happily. Through his writing, he was able to create his own theater: "I love the flow of turning the pages, the suspense of what's next. Ideas just come at me and after me. It's all so natural. I work all the time, long into the night, and it's such a pleasure. I don't know when the time ends. I've never been happier in my life!"

Don died in 1978, after a long and successful career. He created many beloved characters in his lifetime, perhaps the most beloved among them a stuffed, overall-wearing bear named Corduroy.

Don Freeman was the author and illustrator of many popular books for children, including Corduroy, A Pocket for Corduroy, and the Caldecott Honor Book Fly High, Fly Low.

Customer Reviews

My 4 year old daughter loves it!
Jennifer Belmore
This book was the hit of the baby shower this book was given at.
Online Shopping Nurse
I remember reading this book as a child.
Jessica G.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

53 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Donald Mitchell HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 30, 2000
Format: Paperback
Researchers constantly find that reading to children is valuable in a variety of ways, not least of which are instilling a love of reading and improved reading skills. With better parent-child bonding from reading, you child will also be more emotionally secure and able to relate better to others. Intellectual performance will expand as well. Spending time together watching television fails as a substitute.
To help other parents apply this advice, as a parent of four I consulted an expert, our youngest child, and asked her to share with me her favorite books that were read to her as a young child. A Pocket for Corduroy was one of her picks. Since the story is well summarized here at Amazon.com, I would like to focus on why the story is an important one to share.
First, Lisa is shown as being not such a young child. Yet she carries her teddy bear, Corduroy, with her openly. No one comments on that, shames her about it, or acts as though she is doing anything strange. Children draw great comfort from familiar objects, teddy bears, blankets, and other stuffed toys. This book endorses that connection, overcoming the stalled thinking that children must quickly become little adults.
Second, Lisa helps her Mother do the laundry as her primary focus. That shows a connectedness to her Mother and the family that is very encouraging for a child. She can make a contribution although she is a child.
Third, Lisa makes every attempt to be responsible about Corduroy. She tells Corduroy to wait in a chair and not to move. She tries to find Corduroy before leaving the laundromat, and gets her Mother to agree to come back again the next day to find him. Although she is sad, she overcomes her reluctance to be separated and leaves.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
13 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 15, 1998
Format: Paperback
In this sequel to the original "Corduroy" tale, the little furry one accompanies Lisa and her mom to do the family wash. As he overhears Lisa's mom telling her to clean out the pockets in the clothes, Corduroy realizes his overalls don't have pockets and he thinks he'd better go remedy that situation right now. The rest of the book is a "bear's eye" view of the sights, smells, and sounds of an inner-city laundromat. What I love most about the Corduroy books and characters are that they show everyday life as I wish it could be--where strangers take a moment to do kindnesses for one another, and even a little innocent fellow who needs help can find it without having to ask. The original Corduroy book was a gift to my daughter. I bought this sequel for myself as much as I did for her. Parents and kids, curl up and enjoy this together!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Melissa P. Cooper on January 24, 2001
Format: Paperback
In this installment of Corduroy's adventures with Lisa, we see that some time has passed since she first brought him home from the department store. She's taller, wearing her hair a little straighter, and her mom looks like she had a makeover, too. Corduroy, however, is wearing the same green overalls he did in the first book and has managed to keep both buttons on this time. Early on in the book, however, Corduroy decides he needs a pocket, and in the search for one gets separated from Lisa and her mom while they are in the laundromat. They leave without him, setting him up for a meeting with a friendly stranger who washes his overalls for him, as well as encounters with such laundromat staples as powder detergent and pushcarts.
As in the first book, Lisa comes back for him the next day, and once again her needle and thread come to the rescue.
This book and "Corduroy" are the only two Corduroy books my daughter and I have read. I wonder if there are others, and what kind of sartorial splendor Corduroy will be arrayed in next if the trend continued!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Arlolikesstickers on January 28, 2008
Format: Hardcover
My 2 1/2 year old adores this book. In fact, I have had to make a rule of no more than twice a day. He calls it the "laundry book". I must disagree about the caged bear scene being frightening. My son specifically requests the caged bear scene and is obviously not scared in the least. It is a sweet tale of a little girl and her little bear. I love how the author uses some big words in a children's book. My son's vocabulary has grown exponentially!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By goonius on January 17, 2010
Format: Hardcover
I really wanted to like this book. We rather enjoyed the original Corduroy. This one has fine pictures, as do all of Freeman's stories, but the story just seems... lacking.

Corduroy accompanies Lisa and her mother to the laundromat, and having overheard a conversation between Lisa and her mother decides a pocket is something he needs. He wanders off, ends up in a bag of wet laundry, goes for a spin in the dryer, tips a box of soap, and ends up trapped in a rolling laundry basket. Lisa finds him first thing the next day, and lovingly scolds him, saying she would be happy to make him a pocket.

The story has a bit of the obligatory alliteration that is often Don Freeman's trademark, but it feels a bit empty. It just doesn't have quite the sweetness and cleverness that so many of Don Freeman's stories have that make for an enduring book (ie. one you or your child will want to pull of the shelf time and time again).

I'm not disappointed we added this to our collection. It's alright for a once-in-a-while read. And it's probably a must-have for fans of Corduroy. But compared to the many, many wonderful books by Don Freeman, I just couldn't see awarding this one with more than three stars.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
A Pocket for Corduroy
This item: A Pocket for Corduroy
Price: $16.99 $13.59
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com