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A Recipe for Religion [Kindle Edition]

Christopher Dillingham , The Flying Spaghetti Monster
4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)

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Book Description

A Recipe for Religion examines whether Inmate X, an imprisoned follower of The Church of the Flying Spaghetti Monster (FSM), can practice her religion and if she is entitled to the same First Amendment protections as a "traditional" theist -- including a Friday supper of pasta (as befits any sincere follower of "Pastafarianism") while a prisoner.

Inmate X prevails under two legal principles:

1. The Seeger Sincere Belief test, which states while the government can inquire about a religions adherent's sincerity in her beliefs, it cannot make any judgment about what is "believable."
2. Atheism, which the First Amendment protects since it occupies the same sphere as would a traditional religion in an Atheist's mind.

A Recipe for Religion is a short read, but it is also humorous in several areas. There are many comparisons, for example, between the FSM religion and Scientology -- both of which had nontraditional and extremely controversial origins.

There are very few books on the market that make valid legal arguments for supporting Atheism, and you will be surprised at amount of legal research and facts in this book, all of which you can use to argue your points against any theist who erroneously claims his religion has special validity under the US Constitution.

No, this is not a joke. This is a serious legal analysis that explores just how much freedom Americans possess under the Free Exercise, Free Speech and Freedom of Association Clauses of the United States' Constitutions First Amendment.

Do you want to found the next Scientology? Buy this book, follow its recipe, and start your own cult today.

Christopher Dillingham, a First Amendment advocate and Florida attorney, wrote A Recipe for Religion for his Doctor of Jurisprudence degree in 2011.


Product Details

  • File Size: 148 KB
  • Print Length: 34 pages
  • Publisher: Christopher Dillingham (February 16, 2012)
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B007AG2CF8
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #977,585 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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3.0 out of 5 stars Not what I expected. January 23, 2014
By Janae
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This book was not a fictional account of a Pastafarian seeking the right to practice her faith in prison. It was not an actual account of a Pastafarian seeking the right to practice her faith in prison. The reference to the Flying Spaghetti Monster and the Pastafarian faith could have very easily been interchanged with any other outrageous religious claims. The book is targeted at fans of the Flying Spaghetti Monster and it had very little to do with Pastafarianism. It was however an interesting read about the history of case law regarding outrageous political claims throughout U.S. history. This did feel like reading a text book or a complex legal document. This book was more educational than it was entertaining. This book would be more fairly targeted at law students rather than Pastafarians. It was not an overall disappointment but if you are looking for Pastafarian literature, it is safe to skip this book. Manager: A Female Flying Spaghetti Monster by Vasudera Torrent, Spaghetti Issues by Eric Whitfield or the Loose Canon are a few suggestions if you are looking for pure Pastafarian literature.
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4.0 out of 5 stars What qualifies as a religion and why? November 24, 2013
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
This was an interesting little book. It posed some interesting questions about what qualifies as a "religion" and should be granted the same First Amendment rights and benefits that Christianity, Islam, or Judaism enjoys. Since the religion in question involved the unorthodox belief in "the flying spaghetti monster" as a deity, the legal battle which ensued was amusing in places, but thought-provoking in that a test for reasonableness was not really applicable. If the belief system had an independent following and met certain other tests, the courts could not dismiss it because the deity (in the mind of most people) was outlandish or silly.

Score one for the entrée on an Italian menu! Actually, it is no more nonsensical than fervent belief in any established religion. They all have their unreasonable stories and superstitions which should place doubt in any thinking person's mind. When primitive man had no better way to explain phenomena in his environment, he created gods to give some reason for the things he saw and did not understand. In the 21st century, our scientific knowledge related to scary things in the sky, volcanic eruptions, and so forth are now better understood. Strangely, in the US as well as much of the Third World, religions still maintain a firm grip on the minds of many; people still prefer to believe superstition rather than logic, for reasons that completely escape me.

Because of the nature of the subject matter of the book, a lot of the entries related to numerous prior court cases which made the reading somewhat dry in many ways, but the book overall was amusing and thought-provoking. I would recommend this short read to the more scholarly among us. If nothing else, you should find the book funny!
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5.0 out of 5 stars RAmen! February 23, 2012
Format:Kindle Edition|Verified Purchase
A fast, fun read that is both intellectually stimulating and hilarious! As a former law student, some of the citations were familiar from my constitutional law classes, but the application to a hypothetical inmate and an NRM (new Religious Movement)was new to me and very eye-opening. I am familiar with the legal battles regarding Scientology as well, but I now understand better the legal reasoning for some of the decisions, even though I may disagree with them. This book is very timely, with the current crop of Republican candidates spouting radical theological nonsense in the name of "freedom". If you want to know the rationale for separation of Church and State, this book will give you a good basic understanding, and make you laugh, too!
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More About the Author

Greetings!

I hope you have enjoyed my books. I am a Florida attorney who has a profound interest in constitutional, criminal, and personal injury law.

If you have any questions or suggestions about my books, please feel free to contact me.


Kindest regards,

Christopher Dillingham, Esq.

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