Engineering & Transportation
Qty:1
  • List Price: $19.00
  • Save: $1.98 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Eligible for Amazon's FREE Super Saver/Prime Shipping, 24/7 Customer Service, and package tracking. 100% Satisfaction Guarantee.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell?
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Scientist in the City Paperback – December 1, 1994


See all 7 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$17.02
$7.30 $0.01

Frequently Bought Together

A Scientist in the City + A Scientist at the Seashore (Dover Science Books)
Price for both: $21.80

Buy the selected items together

Customers Who Bought This Item Also Bought

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Shop the new tech.book(store)
New! Introducing the tech.book(store), a hub for Software Developers and Architects, Networking Administrators, TPMs, and other technology professionals to find highly-rated and highly-relevant career resources. Shop books on programming and big data, or read this week's blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the tech industry. > Shop now

Product Details

  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Anchor; Anchor Books ed edition (December 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385261098
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385261098
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 5.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,234,091 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

After last year's brave foray into the biology of the abortion controversy in The Facts of Life (written with Harold Morowitz), Trefil returns to the general science territory he staked out in A Scientist at the Seashore. This city-mouse version of that title is an equally felicitous adventure for the science lover isolated from nature's countryside lab. The physical sciences predominate here as Trefil offers deft analogies to explain invisible forces like gravity in building architecture, e.g., comparing masonry structures and skyscrapers to crustaceans (with exoskeletons) and humans, whose weight-bearing skeleton is internal. He explains the atomic structure of materials that underlie every corner of a city block and includes other systems like power grids on the tour. The addition of a futurist urban vision adds little to the text but does not mitigate Trefil's particular talent for lively explanation. Illustrated.
Copyright 1993 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From School Library Journal

YA-Trefil states that a city is an environment built by one of nature's creatures, man. Therefore, it is a "natural system, and we can study it the same way we study other natural systems." Whether or not readers accept this premise, the resultant study is fascinating. Trefil leads readers through the history of cities as a result of the development of various technologies and humanity's needs. Each chapter is filled with scientific facts. On virtually every page, however, is a little nugget of information that adds spice to the mixture of physical laws or engineering truths. For example, insects fly higher in urban areas as a result of the higher levels of the hotter air. The opening chapters describe the development of various technologies such as steel, glass-making, structural engineering, or subways and the resulting changes in cities because of them, while the last sections describe future possibilities. The book can be read, and very enjoyably too, straight through. It can, as well, be used for research papers. It contains wonderful descriptions of scientific processes. The author stresses the need for understanding the laws of nature as technologies develop, as opposed to the use of "clever techniques," and he makes the learning of many of these laws almost painless.
Susan H. Woodcock, King's Park Library, Burke, VA
Copyright 1994 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 29, 1997
Format: Hardcover
Book Report: A Scientist in the City, by James Trefil

I picked up this book because the title intrigued me. I found it a well written and layperson-friendly explanation of the technology that makes cities possible and what that technology is likely to enable in the future. Trefil is an author that one feels a connection with quickly-he is a very beguiling storyteller.

This book is not about social issues. It is about the materials and building blocks of cities. Trefil discusses materials, such as wood, brick, concrete, steel and glass. He investigates what holds buildings up and what conspires to tear them down. (The real challenge for a modern skyscraper, for example, is not collapse, but wind.) Moving people, energy and information around are city factors he visits at length.

Sound boring? Its not. For example, he discusses how most of the glass manufactured in the U.S. today is made by a process called floating. "Glass is melted, then poured onto a pool of molten tin. The glass floats on the metal, hence the name of the process. Near the furnace, the glass is heated from above to keep it fluid, and as a result it flows into a uniform thin sheet. . . This process has the advantage of never having the glass come into contact with rollers, so that it doesn't have to be ground or polished after it comes out of the furnace." I have no earthly idea what I will ever need that information for, but I find it absolutely fascinating.

Cool as that part is, Trefil goes on to discuss the future he believes most likely. He foresees that the Edge City pollution problems can be solved by electric cars and better recycling, but the congestion issues will need the information economy to remove the need to commute at all.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 29, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book was very interlectial and extreamly facinating. I throughly enjoyed readin this book about a scientist that gets lost in the city. My mum,dad,brothers,uncles,aunts also liked this book because I lent it to them all.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 28, 2006
Format: Paperback
This was required reading back when I was a college freshman for all english 101 classes.

It was sooo horrible, I couldn't get past page 3. Without fail, I would fall deeply asleep for hours. Fortunately, for me, my ENG 101 professor couldn't get through the book either.

Don't get me wrong, it wasn't because it was a dry subject matter. I did read plenty of that (and do to this day) quite easily and with interest.

It was the meandering, stream of consciousness style that just is torturous to read.

I did keep it. It has proven over the past 11 years to be better than any sleeping pill on the market.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?