Start reading A Short History of Nearly Everything on the free Kindle Reading App or on your Kindle in under a minute. Don't have a Kindle? Get your Kindle here.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Add Audible Narration

A Short History of Nearly Everything
Narrated by Richard Matthews
$43.93 $12.99
Enter a promotion code
or gift card
 
 
 

Try it free

Sample the beginning of this book for free

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Sorry, this item is not available in
Image not available for
Color:
Image not available

To view this video download Flash Player

 

A Short History of Nearly Everything [Kindle Edition]

Bill Bryson
4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1,691 customer reviews)

Print List Price: $16.99
Kindle Price: $9.49
You Save: $7.50 (44%)
Sold by: Random House LLC

Free Kindle Reading App Anybody can read Kindle books—even without a Kindle device—with the FREE Kindle app for smartphones, tablets and computers.

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Audible Narration

Switch back and forth between reading the Kindle book and listening to the Audible narration with Whispersync for Voice. Add narration for a reduced price of $12.99 when you buy the Kindle book.

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Book Description

One of the world’s most beloved writers and bestselling author of One Summer takes his ultimate journey—into the most intriguing and intractable questions that science seeks to answer.

In A Walk in the Woods, Bill Bryson trekked the Appalachian Trailwell, most of it. In A Sunburned Country, he confronted some of the most lethal wildlife Australia has to offer. Now, in his biggest book, he confronts his greatest challenge: to understandand, if possible, answerthe oldest, biggest questions we have posed about the universe and ourselves. Taking as territory everything from the Big Bang to the rise of civilization, Bryson seeks to understand how we got from there being nothing at all to there being us. To that end, he has attached himself to a host of the world’s most advanced (and often obsessed) archaeologists, anthropologists, and mathematicians, travelling to their offices, laboratories, and field camps. He has read (or tried to read) their books, pestered them with questions, apprenticed himself to their powerful minds. A Short History of Nearly Everything is the record of this quest, and it is a sometimes profound, sometimes funny, and always supremely clear and entertaining adventure in the realms of human knowledge, as only Bill Bryson can render it. Science has never been more involving or entertaining.



Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

From primordial nothingness to this very moment, A Short History of Nearly Everything reports what happened and how humans figured it out. To accomplish this daunting literary task, Bill Bryson uses hundreds of sources, from popular science books to interviews with luminaries in various fields. His aim is to help people like him, who rejected stale school textbooks and dry explanations, to appreciate how we have used science to understand the smallest particles and the unimaginably vast expanses of space. With his distinctive prose style and wit, Bryson succeeds admirably. Though A Short History clocks in at a daunting 500-plus pages and covers the same material as every science book before it, it reads something like a particularly detailed novel (albeit without a plot). Each longish chapter is devoted to a topic like the age of our planet or how cells work, and these chapters are grouped into larger sections such as "The Size of the Earth" and "Life Itself." Bryson chats with experts like Richard Fortey (author of Life and Trilobite) and these interviews are charming. But it's when Bryson dives into some of science's best and most embarrassing fights--Cope vs. Marsh, Conway Morris vs. Gould--that he finds literary gold. --Therese Littleton

From Publishers Weekly

As the title suggests, bestselling author Bryson (In a Sunburned Country) sets out to put his irrepressible stamp on all things under the sun. As he states at the outset, this is a book about life, the universe and everything, from the Big Bang to the ascendancy of Homo sapiens. "This is a book about how it happened," the author writes. "In particular how we went from there being nothing at all to there being something, and then how a little of that something turned into us, and also what happened in between and since." What follows is a brick of a volume summarizing moments both great and curious in the history of science, covering already well-trod territory in the fields of cosmology, astronomy, paleontology, geology, chemistry, physics and so on. Bryson relies on some of the best material in the history of science to have come out in recent years. This is great for Bryson fans, who can encounter this material in its barest essence with the bonus of having it served up in Bryson's distinctive voice. But readers in the field will already have studied this information more in-depth in the originals and may find themselves questioning the point of a breakneck tour of the sciences that contributes nothing novel. Nevertheless, to read Bryson is to travel with a memoirist gifted with wry observation and keen insight that shed new light on things we mistake for commonplace. To accompany the author as he travels with the likes of Charles Darwin on the Beagle, Albert Einstein or Isaac Newton is a trip worth taking for most readers.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Product Details

  • File Size: 1796 KB
  • Print Length: 560 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 0767908171
  • Publisher: Broadway Books; 1 edition (October 26, 2006)
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B000FBFNII
  • Text-to-Speech: Not enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #27,863 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews
691 of 707 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
I picked this one up expecting "good". Instead, I got one of the most delightful reading experiences in science that I have ever had. What a wonderful surprise.
Bryson tries to do what most school textbooks never manage to do, explain the context of science in a way that is relevant to the average person. At the beginning of the book, he recalls an event from his childhood when he looked at a school text and saw a cross-section of our planet. He was transfixed by it, but noticed that the book just dryly presented the facts ("This is the core." "This part is molten rock." "This is the crust.", etc.), but never really explained HOW science came to know this particular set of facts. That, he quite correctly points out, is the most interesting part. And that is story he sets out to tell in this book.
Bryson obviously spent a great deal of time and effort developing and checking his facts and presentation. He obviously enjoyed every minute of it too, and it shows. Never have I read a book where the author conveyed such joyful awe of what we have learned as a species (with the possible exception of some of Richard Feynman's books).
My benchmark for this kind of book is usually; How well does it explain modern physics? There are few books out there that manage to explain relativity, quantum mechanics and string theory in a way that doesn't make your eyes glaze over. The Dancing Wu Li Masters by Gary Zukav is the best of the lot in my opinion. While this book did not change my opinion, Bryson's explanations of these mind-bending theories are not only lucid and sensible, they are also full of his telltale tongue-in-cheek side comments and therefore are just plain fun to read.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
209 of 216 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Man Said to the Universe November 13, 2005
Format:Hardcover
Bryson's "A Short History of Nearly Everything" is beautifully written, very entertaining and highly informative--and now, it is lavishly illustrated as well.

Bryson is not a scientist, but rather a curious and observant writer who, several years ago, realized that he couldn't tell a quark from a quasar, or a proton from a protein. Bryson set out to cure his ignorance of things scientific, and the result was "A Short History of Nearly Everything," which was originally published in 2003.

For readers who are new to science and its history, "A Short History of Nearly Everything" contains one remarkable revelation after another. It is amazing how enormous, tiny, complex and just plain weird the universe is. Learning about "everything" is a humbling experience, and I kept thinking of Stephen Crane's blank verse: "A man said to the Universe: 'Sir, I exist!' 'However,' replied the Universe, 'the fact has not created in me a sense of obligation.'"

Just as engaging as Bryson's story of what we know is the parallel story of how we know it--from the first clever experiments to figure out how much the earth weighs to today's ongoing efforts to describe the origins of the universe itself, it becomes obvious that science is not an answer but a process, a way of learning about a world that always seems to have one more trick up its sleeve.

Whatever else may be said about the universe, Bryson explains that learning about its mysteries is a very human endeavor.
Read more ›
Was this review helpful to you?
168 of 178 people found the following review helpful
Format:Hardcover
I am a big fan of Bill Bryson's travelogues. I was therefore surprised when I cam across this, somewhat more weighty, tome. But I am pleased that I picked it up.
The author says he didn't do very well in science when he was in school because the teachers and texts seemed to be hiding all the good stuff. Now, as an adult, he's gone after the good stuff. And he's the guy to write it so the rest of us can understand. Not only does he write clearly, but he's very good at explaining as much as a normal person can understand (of relativity, for example), while pointing to the stuff that's weird, and setting aside the stuff that you have to be a specialist to understand.
He also is very good at giving credit to people who thought of things but were ignored until someone else came along and took credit. This has happened all too frequently, and it's good for the record to be set straight.
If you too were afraid of science, this is a wonderful book. If you already know a lot of this but just like to read enjoyable writing--it's also a wonderful book.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
127 of 136 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Not Dumbed down. Gets you very excited about science. October 31, 2003
By Trip
Format:Hardcover
This book is the type of book that would inspire you to become a biologist or a geologist or an astronomer. From this book you are able to see bits and pieces of famous scientists lives and get a feeling by the end that its not all fun and games but at the same time it soooo very worth it to dedicate your life to the pursuit of furthering the knowledge of your fellow human beings and in some small way pushing our species in a positive direction. From reading this book you find out how all the knowledge from hundreds of years ago has become the basis of where we are today. This is conveyed extremely well to the audience. The other thing which is conveyed so very well is the power and destructive force of mother nature here on earth and in space. Parts of this book read better than seeing an end of the world movie because the author is so good at getting a vivid picture drawn in the reader's minds eye.
This book is so good and so comprehensive I can see myself reading this over again.
Thank you Bill Bryson for your hard, extensive research! Quite remarkable.
Comment | 
Was this review helpful to you?
Most Recent Customer Reviews
5.0 out of 5 stars Brilliant book, offers fascinating insights into so many things
Brilliant book, offers fascinating insights into so many things. Everything really. Great to go along with David Christian's Big History
Published 4 days ago by Mark Anderson
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent fascinating book
One of my favorite books
Published 6 days ago by JDR
5.0 out of 5 stars Ten stars
This is an extraordinary tour of how so much of what we knew came out of where? Out of somebody's head, wild idea, intuition, or who knows what? Read more
Published 6 days ago by Mark Baldwin
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
A must read
Published 6 days ago by Alan van Lingen
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
This book single-handedly changed how I see the Universe.
Published 7 days ago by Blake Guthrie
5.0 out of 5 stars it is a good read.
I'm going to order more for gifts, it is a good read.
Published 7 days ago by edith thue
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Great book informative yet easy to read
Published 7 days ago by David Longden
5.0 out of 5 stars Great stories by one of the best English writers. Book is well...
Great book by one of the best English writers. Great how he can turn something like science and history into a great read. Read more
Published 7 days ago by James Dylan
5.0 out of 5 stars Bill Bryson writes about more than traveling and this book proves it.
Bill Bryson at his best. I got for my sister who has purple spaghetti monster blinders on.
Published 8 days ago by subwo
5.0 out of 5 stars Five Stars
Nice book.
Published 9 days ago by Katrina Ward
Search Customer Reviews
Search these reviews only

More About the Author

Bill Bryson was born in Des Moines, Iowa. For twenty years he lived in England, where he worked for the Times and the Independent, and wrote for most major British and American publications. His books include travel memoirs (Neither Here Nor There; The Lost Continent; Notes from a Small Island) and books on language (The Mother Tongue; Made in America). His account of his attempts to walk the Appalachian Trail, A Walk in the Woods, was a huge New York Times bestseller. He lives in Hanover, New Hampshire, with his wife and his four children.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

(What's this?)


Forums

Search Customer Discussions
Search all Amazon discussions

Topic From this Discussion
Anthropological Alternative.
I would recommend the Third Chimpanzee by Jared Diamond as a good place to start.
Jan 2, 2012 by M. Vanegas |  See all 4 posts
Illustrated Kindle version?
I think there should be some kind of figure of merit in the Kindle book description that gives a feel for the Kindle edition Vs. the paper edition with respect to the illustrations. For example, if the book has no illustrations, the figure would be 10. If the book has illustrations and they do... Read More
Dec 21, 2010 by S. Schmidt |  See all 3 posts
Up to Date
I'm reading this book right now. While there will be a few small things here and there that are out of date (like Pluto's status) the majority of the book covers the history of how we know these things. So all the information about Percevil Lowell, Pluto's moon, Clyde Tombaugh, and all other... Read More
Jun 5, 2011 by J. Cahill |  See all 4 posts
What errors have you found in the book and how serious are they?
Regarding emailing for a 5 page list: it would be helpful if you could post at least some of your examples here so that everyone could get an idea of what you're talking about.
Oct 2, 2007 by Doc Dave |  See all 26 posts
how is the used hardcover options? Be the first to reply
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 



Look for Similar Items by Category