A Single Man 2009 R CC

Amazon Instant Video

(201) IMDb 7.6/10
Available in HD

A SINGLE MAN is based on the novel of the same name by Christopher Isherwood. Set in Los Angeles in 1962, at the height of the Cuban missile crisis, it is the story of a British college professor (Colin Firth) who is struggling to find meaning to his life after the death of his long time partner. The story is a romantic tale of love interrupted, the isolation that is an inherent part of the hum.

Starring:
Colin Firth, Julianne Moore
Runtime:
1 hour 41 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

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A Single Man

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Product Details

Genres Drama
Director Tom Ford
Starring Colin Firth, Julianne Moore
Supporting actors Nicholas Hoult, Matthew Goode, Jon Kortajarena, Paulette Lamori, Ryan Simpkins, Ginnifer Goodwin, Teddy Sears, Paul Butler, Aaron Sanders, Aline Weber, Keri Lynn Pratt, Jenna Gavigan, Alicia Carr, Lee Pace, Adam Shapiro, Marlene Martinez, Ridge Canipe, Elisabeth Harnois
Studio Weinstein Company
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 24 hour viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Customer Reviews

It's a beautifully shot film.
M Mercury
The film is about raw human emotion, about love and loss and the grief every human being feels when he or she has lost someone important.
Rodney Bucket
As for the performance of both Colin Firth and Julianne Moore, I have but one work... BRAVO!
Daniel Hayes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

279 of 292 people found the following review helpful By Chris Pandolfi on December 23, 2009
George Falconer (Colin Firth), a British literature professor living in Los Angeles in 1962, is struggling to find meaning in his life. That's an awfully generic way to start a movie review, and I agree that many movies are about the struggle for meaning in life. But in the case of "A Single Man," an adaptation of Christopher Isherwood's novel, the idea seems neither hackneyed nor overused; we follow George over the course of one day and actually see and respond to his struggle to find meaning. Ever since a car accident took the life of Jim, his lover of sixteen years (Matthew Goode), George has been on a desperate search for some degree of contentment, some sign that he can love again and will be loved in return. He hasn't found it yet. He may never again find it. So why not make use of the gun in the desk drawer?

This film marks the directorial debut of Tom Ford, the fashion designer and former creative director of the Gucci house. It would be brilliant even if it had been his twentieth film. It's a story of astonishing observation and poignancy, where beauty is found not only in the form of a face or the arc of an eyebrow, but also in the cold bleakness of a winter road, where pain and death give way to encounters of surprising tenderness. It's a masterpiece of character development and performance; every one of George's onscreen appearances, for example, is an opportunity for Ford to reveal him to us, which is to say we never see him in an empty or extraneous moment. The dialogue is a perfect blend of insight, contemplation, and wit - one of those rare instances where every word is carefully placed yet strung together as naturally as regular conversation.
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76 of 81 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 3, 2010
Now and then a film comes along that is so perfect as examined from every angle that restores faith in the art of motion pictures. Such is the case with A SINGLE MAN. Starting with the beautiful novel of a gay British professor's planned last day of life in Southern California by Christopher Isherwood, adapted for the screen by Tom Ford with dignity and the power to open up the subtleties of Isherwood's book without treading on the solemnity of the books message, directed by that same newcomer Tom Ford with conviction and identification with Isherwood's characters, and then acted with consummate skill by Colin Firth as single man George who is surrounded with an excellent supporting cast - this film is in a class by itself and hopefully those who decide on the awards for best film/best acting will honor it.

George (Colin Firth) begins what appears to be a rather ordinary day for a teacher of English in a close by college, the voice over by Firth relates the routine of rising and facing another day of loneliness he has been experiencing since the accidental death of his young lover Jim (Matthew Goode), yet there is something unique about this day: George is preparing for his last day on earth as he sets out his funeral attire and his gun and other accoutrements that suggest he is seriously going to end his life. He busies himself with getting to class, leaving money for his housekeeper Alva (Paulette Lamori), facing students who seem to be uninvolved with life in general and his course on Aldous Huxley in particular, then clearing his office and progressing with his exit plan.
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55 of 58 people found the following review helpful By wolfgang731 on February 19, 2010
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This film took me by surprise. Being that this was Tom Ford's directorial debut, I didn't know what sort of expectations, if any, I should have had. That speculation was a profound waste of time. I like a great many movies but I love only a handful and this one falls squarely in the center of the latter category. I found it a profoundly lyrical and human exploration of the weight of loss, of the way we try to continue with a life that is now seemingly foreign because it is so jarringly incomplete; a study in reflective motion - the stranger in the mirror that shadows us. We witness how from the moment he wakes, George struggles to just exist in the most normal sense rather than live in the more extraordinary one. As he states early in the film "You see, my heart has been broken." However, we not only see it, we come to feel it. We are wholly sympathetic to him because, in many ways, he's all of us. Just like his loss, George's pain is universal and through that hole in his soul, we enter and come to know him. Colin Firth's performance is superb; a walking testament to weary resignation and automatic reflex. He operates by rote and instinct, struggling to reach the end of every minute of his day. The clocks in his world move ever so slowly and the monotone tick of the seconds hand reminds him just how much more of the day still looms darkly before him. Firth walks that very tricky tightrope with a character that can very easily become the embodiment of all that is maudlin while simultaneously failing to elicit even an ounce of compassion from the viewer. Caricature is one misstep away but he doesn't come anywhere near that pitfall. George is a sad creature, no doubt, but he's not pathetic; a dignified streak runs prominently through him.Read more ›
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