A Small Act 2011 NR CC

Amazon Instant Video

(20) IMDb 7.4/10

A testament to the rippling effect of a single act of kindness, A SMALL ACT follows a rural Kenyan student-turned-Harvard-grad as he tracks down the woman whose sponsorship changed his life.

Starring:
Chris Mburu
Runtime:
1 hour 28 minutes

A Small Act

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Jennifer Arnold
Starring Chris Mburu
Studio Docurama
MPAA rating NR (Not Rated)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

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See all 20 customer reviews
Very moving story.
Amazon Customer
Eventually he became a lawyer, went to Harvard, and even became a chief advocate for human rights as an important employee of the United Nations.
Gerard D. Launay
Makes me hopeful to hear and see stories like this one.
j.stevie

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 29 people found the following review helpful By Gerard D. Launay on September 19, 2010
Format: DVD
Yes...there are many horrors in the world today - TV news floods us with stories of environmental degradation, terrible crimes, foreclosures out of control, wall street greed. So, from time to time, it is worthwhile to remember that there are random acts of kindness that can create waves of "the good". This is such a story

A child who was rescued from the Nazi holocaust - Hilda Back - later became a schoolteacher. Because she was rescued by a small act of charity, she wanted to give something back to another person. So...she supported an African child - Chris Mburu - from Kenya as a charitable act through those Jewish or Christian charity organizations. Food and school made it possible for this young man to pull himself up from dark poverty. Eventually he became a lawyer, went to Harvard, and even became a chief advocate for human rights as an important employee of the United Nations. And he has gone back to his country to provide education in the midst of bitter civil war and abject poverty. His goal - only education will "enlighten" the young to move towards tolerance and economic sustainability.

The recipient of Hilde Back's charity has returned the gift. He has set up a small educational fund to give - every year - 10 high school scholarships to African children It is likely these boys and girls will become leaders; and so, the wave of goodness continues.

The film compellingly details the strength of will of young people desperate for education in their 3rd world environment of terrible poverty, sickness, and war - a determination of spirit that is usually lacking in America where our educational gifts are taken for granted and squandered.

Overall, the film has the "feeling" of an episode of "CNN's HEROES". The bottom line is that, yes, it is a story of heroes. I truly hope the film will generate an avalanche of charity.
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Format: DVD
The absolutely irresistible premise behind Jennifer Arnold's well meaning documentary "A Small Act" is so simple, yet so revelatory. Even the smallest act of kindness can have long range repercussions. The hook of the story revolves around Chris Mburu, a student in Kenya, whose secondary education was funded by a woman in Sweden for a few dollars a month. Chris went on to study internationally at Harvard and became a Human Rights Lawyer for the United Nations in Geneva. It's a miraculous success story, as most Kenyan students can not afford to go beyond primary school, dependant on a stranger's altruism. There is an added irony that Chris works in Human Rights while his benefactor was a Jewish Holocaust refugee. The film shows what happened as Chris tracked down his savior, the close bond they formed, and how Chris attempts to pay it forward within his home community.

At ninety minutes, the film almost covers too much territory. This central premise is so intriguing and involving, the entire film might have been built around it. It's not, however, and sometimes we lose the primary characters for long stretches of time. I'd say the central narrative drive of the documentary showcases a contemporary school in Kenya and its three most promising students. Chris has established a charity fund to help provide continuing education in the form of scholarships to underprivileged performers. But there are strict guidelines in scoring adequately on a national testing initiative and there are a limed number of slots available. The film plays as high drama as the kids prepare for the test, await its results, and vie for participation in the scholarship program. This, too, would have made a powerful and dynamic film on its own right.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By V. Lee on April 24, 2011
Format: DVD
Our local university sponsored a screening of A Small Act. As I watched I recalled my own experience in a Maasai village where I first became aware of the hunger for education shared by young people in villages with barely the means for daily living. They had some early schooling that accounted for their use and understanding of the English language but in order to continue their education, financial sponsorship was needed. A Small Act puts this story on the wide screen for a wider audience to share my sense of "what if?" for our highly motivated and appreciative third world neighbors. The producer of A Small Act attended the screening and shared her experiences of trying to get this story to the screen with very limited resources. The story was brought to her attention while she was attending the University of Nairobi. She managed to engage a friend who served the dual role as videographer/producer and those two women made a way out of no way to get this story on video. The story behind the story that she shared was almost as entertaining and informative as the story of Hilde's gift and Chris' determination.
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Format: Amazon Instant Video
The absolutely irresistible premise behind Jennifer Arnold's well meaning documentary "A Small Act" is so simple, yet so revelatory. Even the smallest act of kindness can have long range repercussions. The hook of the story revolves around Chris Mburu, a student in Kenya, whose secondary education was funded by a woman in Sweden for a few dollars a month. Chris went on to study internationally at Harvard and became a Human Rights Lawyer for the United Nations in Geneva. It's a miraculous success story, as most Kenyan students can not afford to go beyond primary school, dependant on a stranger's altruism. There is an added irony that Chris works in Human Rights while his benefactor was a Jewish Holocaust refugee. The film shows what happened as Chris tracked down his savior, the close bond they formed, and how Chris attempts to pay it forward within his home community.

At ninety minutes, the film almost covers too much territory. This central premise is so intriguing and involving, the entire film might have been built around it. It's not, however, and sometimes we lose the primary characters for long stretches of time. I'd say the central narrative drive of the documentary showcases a contemporary school in Kenya and its three most promising students. Chris has established a charity fund to help provide continuing education in the form of scholarships to underprivileged performers. But there are strict guidelines in scoring adequately on a national testing initiative and there are a limed number of slots available. The film plays as high drama as the kids prepare for the test, await its results, and vie for participation in the scholarship program. This, too, would have made a powerful and dynamic film on its own right.
Read more ›
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